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   City of Rogers  


Background Information

County:   Hennepin
Population:   11,197
GreenStep City category:   B

Full-time equivalent city staff (approx.):   50

Participating township(s) / school district(s):


GreenStep City resolution:   Click here to view the file.
GreenStep City status and date:   STEP 2 (06/10/2012)

GreenStep Coordinator

Mike Bauer
City staff
mbauer@ci.rogers.mn.us
763-428-0947

City web page relating to sustainability/GreenStep activities:
http://www.cityofrogers.org/sustainability-in


Best Practice Actions Underway and Completed

Completed actions are denoted by stars. Mouse over a star for its definition.





Buildings and Lighting   Buildings and Lighting

Efficient Existing Public Buildings
{ BP no. 1 }

Enter complete information into the B3 Building Editor for each city-owned building. Begin routinely entering current, consecutive monthly energy use data. Identify a person responsible for this ongoing data entry. For each building, also enter 12 consecutive months of historical energy use data immediately prior to the start of current data. Annually, post a an updated print screen of the B3 Organization Summary Tab (see Implementation Tools for instructions) to the GreenStep Cities website by May 1st.
Complete 1 Star criterion, except enter 24 consecutive months of historical data and then validate the data entries by looking at patterns/trends and checking inconsistent data to determine accuracy, correct inaccurate entries, and identify potential opportunities for energy savings.
Complete 1 and 2 Star criteria. In addition, conduct ongoing, periodic review of B3 data to validate the data entries, look for indications of energy-related operations and maintenance issues, and identify poorer performing buildings. Annually by May 1st, post a summary of next steps based on this review and analysis and identify a person responsible for conducting it. Assess applicability of energy saving opportunities for the state's Guaranteed Energy Savings Program (GESP).
Action 1: Enter baseline information into the Minnesota B3 Benchmarking database, routinely enter monthly energy use data from all city-owned buildings, and consult with best practice advisor about the Guaranteed Energy Savings Program (GESP).     [Click here for self-reported city details ]

 


Complete no/low-cost changes to operational practices in one poorer-performing building, then summarize the actions taken, such as updating schedules and setbacks, cleaning dust off sensors, enabling computer power management settings, [temperature setbacks, HVAC and lighting schedules, janitorial schedules and responsibilities (including daytime schedules and cleaning sensors/lamps/vents), computer and office equipment power management, plug load policies (refrigerators, space heaters, power strips, task lights, etc.), water conservation, preventive maintenance, etc. Update the B3 Building Editor, as needed, and change the Baseline Time Period in the Baseline tab for that building so it shows the 12-month period immediately prior to implementing the changes. (See Implementation Tools for ideas, definitions, and database/reporting instructions.)
Complete 1 Star criterion for two buildings. Post the Print Screen of the Baseline tab for one of the buildings with the Energy gauge showing at least a 5% decrease in energy use compared to the baseline period [12 months immediately prior to implementing changes]. Continue fine-tuning O&M procedures and monitoring energy usage to identify opportunities for additional savings.
Complete 1 and 2 Star criteria for two buildings. Annually by May 1st, post the Print Screen of the Baseline tab for each building with the Energy gauge showing at least a 10% decrease in energy use compared to the baseline period [12 months immediately prior to implementing changes].
Action 2: Make no/low cost indoor lighting and operational changes in city-owned/school buildings to reduce energy costs.     [Click here for self-reported city details ]

 


Complete retrocommissioning and/or retrofitting work (if GESP is not feasible) on one building. Summarize the actions taken. Update the B3 Building Editor as needed and change the Baseline Time Period to report energy/cost savings (see details under Implementation Tools).
Complete GESP Opportunity Assessment, Investigation & Implementation phases (or other retrocommissioning and/or retrofitting work if GESP is not feasible) on two or more buildings. Post a print screen of B3 data to report energy/cost reductions
Complete 1 and 2 Star criteria. In addition, implement an internal program or use an external program/vendor that institutionalizes, and provides funding/incentives for, ongoing reductions in energy use by city-owned buildings (e.g. internal loan fund, shared savings with employees, capital budgeting based on energy savings, performance incentives and accountability, etc.) Describe the program, results and identify the person responsible for administering it.
Action 3: Invest in energy efficiency opportunities through GESP or, if not feasible, smaller retro-commissioning/retrofit projects in city-owned/school buildings.     [Click here for self-reported city details ]

 


Install a building management system for city buildings for control via office computer or home laptop; implement power management of computers and other information technology energy saving strategies. Report actions taken and results achieved.
Engage employees of the city in efforts to reduce energy use by: turning off, unplugging, enabling power management, or setting timers on equipment, lights and chargers; minimizing personal appliances in the office; using efficient models of (and substitutes for) necessary personal appliances; using task lights instead of ceiling fixtures; and optimizing active use of windows, doors and interior shading devices to conserve energy. Report actions taken and results achieved.
Complete 1 and 2 Star criteria.
Action 4: Implement information technology efforts and city employee engagement to reduce plug loads and building energy use.     [Click here for self-reported city details ]

 


Efficient Existing Private Buildings
{ BP no. 2 }

Identify examples including building lighting upgrades (including exit lights, lighting equipment and controls), and other building/operational improvements in energy and water use and wastewater reduction. Report renewable energy installations under action 26.6
Identify businesses using a green building framework such as LEED to build, operate and maintain their buildings and operations, or businesses currently using Energy Star's Portfolio Manager or similar energy-tracking software.
Identify examples of extensive daylighting or electrochromic window glass and consequent energy/cost savings, installation of a greywater system, or similar innovative improvements.
Action 4: Describe energy/water efficiency actions and other green building practices at businesses located within/nearby the city.     [Click here for self-reported city details ]

 


Summarize watering ordinance; provide education/information around lawn watering and home water conservation and rain barrels. Report conservation rate structures and dynamic user feedback under action 20.7, rain gutter disconnects from sewers under action 20.3
Report residential water use under 75 gal/capita/day; modify and adopt a model landscaping ordinance that encourages low water-use landscaping; assist owners of automatic or underground irrigation systems to install the state-required rain/moisture sensors; report water use changes (which should be in range of 10%); become a WaterSense Partner.
Create and report on a rebate or feebate program to promote purchases of WaterSense- and/or Energy Star-rated appliances; review building water conservation strategies during development reviews; as code allows facilitate household water harvesting / reuse; prohibit city water from supplying lawn irrigation systems.
Action 5: Conserve drinking/groundwater resources by adopting a watering ordinance, water-wise landscaping ordinance/guidance, or a WaterSense purchasing program.     [Click here for self-reported city details ]

 


Efficient Outdoor Lighting and Signals
{ BP no. 4 }

Report synchronized traffic signals, flashing yellow left turn arrow signals, installation of detectors in at least 10% of city signals (operated under traffic actuated/responsive mode). Report roundabouts under best practice action 11.6
Work with the county/MnDOT to interconnect traffic signals and coordinate them in one corridor.
Work with the county/MnDOT to interconnect/coordinate among traffic signals and synchronize them along several corridors.
Action 4: Coordinate traffic signals and/or optimize signal timing so as minimize car idling at intersections yet maintain safe and publicly acceptable vehicle speeds.     [Click here for self-reported city details ]

 


Replace 1/3 of city's existing traffic signals.
Replace 2/3 of city's existing traffic signals.
Replace 100% of city's existing traffic signals.
Action 8: Replace the city's existing traffic signals with LEDs.     [Click here for self-reported city details ]

 


Land Use   Land Use

Comprehensive Plan and Implementation
{ BP no. 6 }

Adopt a comprehensive plan that is less than ten years old (required for Category A cities) OR, Category B and C cities may simply adopt a land use plan that was adopted by a regional entity or the county less than 15 years ago OR they may adopt a city vision that looks at least 20 years into the future.
Include in your plan a sustainability section/chapter, or integrate sustainability goals and strategies into all chapters of your comprehensive plan, or articulate land development principles for creating a complete, compact and connected community. Report climate protection or energy independence goals and objectives under action 6.5
Adopt a development goal that new/infill projects generate enough tax revenue to pay for the related public infrastructure maintenance/replacement over multiple life cycles; reference a capital improvement plan that catalogues public system maintenance obligations by date and cost.
Action 1: Adopt/have an adopted comprehensive plan OR, Category B and C cities may simply adopt a land use plan that was adopted by a regional entity or the county.     [Click here for self-reported city details ]

 


Document where in the zoning code or development regulation the comprehensive plan is referenced as a foundational document or that the purpose of the code is to implement the comprehensive plan.
Comprehensive plan referenced in all land use and development ordinances and regulations in addition to zoning code ordinances.
Individual ordinances or ordinance sections should be introduced with a "Purposes" section that includes language such as the following: "The XXX regulations specifically implement the following goals from the Comprehensive Plan: "
Action 2: Demonstrate that regulatory ordinances comply with the comprehensive plan including but not limited to having the zoning ordinance explicitly reference the comprehensive plan as the foundational document for decision making.     [Click here for self-reported city details ]

 


Efficient City Growth
{ BP no. 7 }

Offer tax-increment financing, land write-downs or other loan/grant tools.
Offer a building permit fee discount or expedited permit review.
Offer at least one tool for life-cycle housing.
Action 4: Provide incentives for infill projects, or for life-cycle housing at or near job or retail centers, or for achieving an average net residential density of seven units per acre.     [Click here for self-reported city details ]

 


Mixed Uses
{ BP no. 8 }

Describe to what degree the district used the Minnesota Model Ordinances for Sustainable Development.
Create a downtown overlay district.
Allow mixed use of office, retail, educational, civic, and residential units all located within the same building.
Action 5: Have a downtown zoning district that allows residential and compatible commercial development.     [Click here for self-reported city details ]

 


Transportation   Transportation

Efficient City Fleets
{ BP no. 13 }

Survey each fleet vehicle by type, MPG and use; implement at least one "right-size" or down-size improvement (for example, use of a sedan instead of a pick-up truck for inspection work, or one multi-purpose vehicle instead of two vehicles).
"Right-size" all vehicles in one portion of the city's fleet (for example, police, or fire, or public works, on inspections) and report any vehicle reductions and improvement in the fleet's average MPG.
"Right-size" all vehicles in the city's fleet and report vehicle reductions and improvement in the fleet's average MPG.
Action 2: Right-size/down-size the city fleet with the most fuel-efficient vehicles that are of an optimal size and capacity for their intended functions.     [Click here for self-reported city details ]

 


Environmental Management   Environmental Management

Purchasing
{ BP no. 15 }

Have a written policy/guidelines/practices specifying purchase of Energy Star equipment/appliances and recycled-content paper (at least 30% post-consumer). Report street lighting/traffic signals under action 4.2
Have a formal EPP policy adopted by the city council; note if this includes centralized purchasing into one office/person.
Track purchases of products/services coded with an environmental attribute through MN's Co-op Purchasing Venture ('state contract'), and summarize percent of yearly purchases that are coded; join with other cities in joint purchasing of EPP products and summarize EPP purchases.
Action 1: Adopt an environmentally preferable purchasing policy or administrative guidelines/practices directing that the city purchase at least:     [Click here for self-reported city details ]

a. EnergyStar certified equipment and appliances and

b. Paper containing at least 30% post-consumer recycled content.


Purchase 10% renewably generated electricity, recommended by the Green Power Partnership for total annual electricity use under 1 million kWh.
Purchase 20% renewably generated electricity or natural gas or liquid fuels or steam heat.
Purchase 50% of city government's energy requirements (electricity, liquid fuels, natural gas, steam heat) from renewable energy sources, or join the Green Power Partnership.
Action 2: Purchase energy used by city government/distributed by a municipal utility from renewable energy sources.     [Click here for self-reported city details ]

 


Adopt a policy or adopt practices for meetings and events hosted by city government addressing issues such as solid waste generated (e.g., paperless city council packets), transit/carpooling to meetings/events. This could include distributing educational materials about holding a no-waste event for use at city-supported events such as National Night Out / Night to Unite. Report broad educational material distributed at events under action 24.4
Achieve 1-star rating and also include a policy for meetings and events taking place on city property, including parks and libraries; include healthy/local/organic food elements.
Achieve 2-star rating and work with at least the largest private venue in the city to cut waste generation by at least 1/3 and to increase recycling by at least 1/3.
Action 7: Lower the environmental footprint of meetings and events in the city.     [Click here for self-reported city details ]

 


Urban Forests
{ BP no. 16 }

Enact requirements such as a tree preservation/replacement ordinance. Report protection of large wooded areas by means of zoning or development review under best practice action 10.3
Address tree preservaton on both public and private lands; enact requirements such as removing requirements to establish turf grass (this does not refer to removing maintenance standards for turf grass) and permitting native landscaping throughout the city.
Require approval of a tree preservation plan before development (tree inventory, tree saving zones, tree replacement for damaged/destroyed trees at a 2:1 ratio or greater).
Action 5: Adopt a tree preservation or native landscaping ordinance.     [Click here for self-reported city details ]

 


Efficient Stormwater Management
{ BP no. 17 }

Work with MPCA stormwater staff to train city staff and to introduce MIDS to the city council.
Use the MIDS calculator for new development and redevelopment site design.
Adopt and implement the MIDS community assistance package (coming early 2014).
Action 1: New action: adopt and use Minnesota's Minimal Impact Design Standards (MIDS).     [Click here for self-reported city details ]

 


Have a stormwater utility with variable fees.
Achieve 1-star rating and reward property owners with decreased fees based upon decreased runoff.
Acheive 2-star rating and use 100% of fees for stormwater program.
Action 4: Create a stormwater utility that uses variable fees to incentivize enhanced stormwater management, minimize the volume of and pollutants in runoff, and educate property owners.     [Click here for self-reported city details ]

 


Erosion and sediment control ordinance has been adopted and implemented. This is a permit requirement for regulated MS4 permittees.
Erosion sediment control ordinance must be followed for sites smaller than one acre.
On-site inspections during all land-disturbing activities performed by the city.
Action 6: Adopt an ordinance with erosion and sediment control provisions as well as requirements for permanent stormwater treatment.     [Click here for self-reported city details ]

 


Efficient Water and Wastewater Facilities
{ BP no. 20 }

Options include shifting operation times of large pumps or activities so as to secure a cheaper electrical rate, purchasing cheaper 'interruptable rate' electricity, installing a peaking generator for load shaving/cost savings as well as backup power.
Evaluate pump efficiency, repair or upgrade to efficient ones and report on anticipated cost savings.
Implement other drinking water facility upgrades such as measurable reduction in chemical use, use of backwash water, etc.
Action 4: Assess energy and chemicals use at drinking water / wastewater facilities and report on implemented changes that had a short payback period.     [Click here for self-reported city details ]

 


Economic and Community Development   Economic and Community Development

Benchmarks & Community Engagement
{ BP no. 24 }

At the least, an annual newspaper/newsletter article or other media outreach to all community members that discusses participation in the GreenStep program (and other programs as are fitting) and refers people to entries on the GreenStep website.
A citizens commission or committee of city staff/officials exists to lead and coordinate GreenStep implementation; a report available online with details on city's GreenStep accomplishments.
A committee of city staff/officials and community members (business, education, religious) exists; annual report includes some metrics, such as dollars spent/saved, energy saved, and any sustainability indicators measured, and energy/carbon inventory data or ecological footprint data if gathered.
Action 1: Use a committee to lead, coordinate and report to community members on implementation of GreenStep best practices.     [Click here for self-reported city details ]

 


At least two informational/educational activities or creation of a group to work on such. Report under action 2.1 marketing and outreach programs that are limited to promoting/achieving residential energy use reduction and energy efficiency. Report targeted campaigns here unless they fit under other best practices, for example 23.3
Sustained activities covering a range of topics (active living, food, water, energy, etc.) that have some challenge, assistance and/or measurement elements.
Sustained activities and reported outcomes such as increased multi-modal commuting, reduced water and energy use, increased local food production, increased business vitality, etc.
Action 4: Conduct or support a broad sustainability education and action campaign involving:     [Click here for self-reported city details ]

a. The entire community

b. Homeowners

c. Block clubs/neighborhood associations

d. Congregations

e. Schools and youth


Green Business Development
{ BP no. 25 }

Promote business assistance providers on your city web site on an ongoing basis, or identify how the city has promoted business assistance to at least 5 for-profit or non-profit organizations about audit/assistance programs within the past year.
Report outcomes from these visits; for example, number of businesses assisted by whom and a sampling of results/improvements made, such as energy or waste reductions. Report assistance to businesses on water conservation and wastewater pretreatment (could be from a city utility) under actions 20.6 and 20.7
Post testimonials from successful assistance that document financial and environmental outcomes.
Action 2: Connect businesses with assistance providers, including utilities, who provide personalized energy, waste or sustainability audits and assistance.     [Click here for self-reported city details ]

 


Collaborate with local organizations, such as a local business group or a business assistance provider, to produce a multi-pronged branding effort (beyond just information on a city or chamber web site) promoting diverse businesses located in/nearby the city.
Compile a list of locally owned businesses located in/nearby the city and promote them.
Create incentives for buying and investing locally; for example, create a local currency or (discounted) local dollar gift certificates. OR report results of your buy local efforts, including specific benefits to the local economy.
Action 7: Conduct or participate in a buy local campaign.     [Click here for self-reported city details ]

 


Local Food
{ BP no. 27 }

Summarize what exists in the city: farmer's markets, garden plots in city parks, etc.
Report on supportive actions taken by the city, such as offering free use of city land, hiring a temporary community garden coordinator, supporting season extension techniques such as hoop houses or greenhouses; donations from markets/gardens to food shelves.
Report on percent of residents within a 1/4 mile of a healthy food source (farmer's market, community garden, CSA drop point, and stores with an NAICS code of 445110 or 455230); convert top level of a parking ramp for a local food growing business.
Action 3: Inventory and promote local food production/distribution within the city:     [Click here for self-reported city details ]

a. A farmer's market or co-op buying club.

b. An urban agriculture business or a community-supported agriculture (CSA) arrangement between farmers and community members/employees.

c. A community or school garden, orchard or forest.