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GreenStep City Best Practices Resilient Economic & Community Development

Climate Adaptation and Community Resilience
no. 29

Plan and prepare for extreme weather, adapt to changing climatic conditions, and foster stronger community connectedness and social and economic vitality.
  Best Practice Action 4      [ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 ]       [all actions]

Encourage private sector action and incentivize investment in preventive approaches that reduce risk and minimize impacts of extreme weather and the changing climate for human health and the built environment.

 
  • Cities can promote Property-Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) financing, available through the many MN counties participating in PACE programs, as a means to strengthen community resilience. PACE can be used by private property owners to finance energy efficiency and renewable energy (+ storage) upgrades for their commercial buildings. [Applicable to 1, 2 and 3 Star implementation.]
  • Green Building and Climate Resilience provides a series of "no-regrets" and "resilient" strategies divided into six categories (including siting and landscape) with priority status by geographic region. [Applicable to 1, 2 and 3 Star implementation.]
  • Developing Urban Resilience is a repository for all of the Urban Land Institute’s resilience research that highlights innovative real estate projects across the country. [Applicable to 1, 2 and 3 Star implementation.]
  • How New Homes Can Stand Up to Disaster provides state-of-the-art techniques to keep homes standing when floods, winds, and fires strike. [Applicable to 1 Star implementation.]
  • The Storm Events Database can be searched by county for incidents of flash flooding, heavy rain, excessive heat, drought, and more from 1950 to the present. Provides detailed descriptions of each specific incident and locations (cities) affected, number of resulting deaths and injuries, and property damage estimates. [Applicable to 1, 2 and 3 Star implementation.]
  • 10 Do’s and Don’ts of Discussing Climate Change provides the words and tools to open the lines of communication around climate change. [Applicable to 1, 2 and 3 Star implementation.]
  • Let's Talk Climate: Messages to Motivate Americans (2015) provides rigorously tested words, phrases, and narratives that link climate change to the values of mainstream Americans. [Applicable to 1, 2 and 3 Star implementation.]
  • The National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) provides updated flood maps, various flood scenarios including winter storms and flash floods, one-step flood risk profile with estimated insurance rates and agent contacts, an interactive tool that shows the cost of a flood to a home or business, and a flood outreach toolkit. [Applicable to 1 Star implementation.]
  • Incentives for Green Infrastructure Implementation on Private Property: Lessons Learned from the Water Resources Foundation provides information and guidance for how municipalities and utilities can create incentives to promote broader, better targeted, and more effective implementation of GI within their stormwater programs and service areas. [Applicable to 3 Star implementation.]
  • The RELi resilience standard is a national consensus standard (ANSI), focused on creating resilient buildings and communities where people look outside their individual properties to view resiliency as a community-wide goal. In November 2017, RELi was adopted by Green Business Certification, Inc. (GBCI), which administers LEED. With its partner, the U.S. Green Building Council, GBCI is working to further refine RELI and synchronize it with LEED. [Applicable to 3 Star implementation.]
  • The 2030 Palette identifies a network of interconnected actions for the planning and design of sustainable and resilient built environments. See section on Heat Island Mitigation and the Related Swatches. [Applicable to 3 Star implementation.]
Develop public education materials/a campaign that encourages private building owners to take basic actions that will prevent damage from extreme weather (such as elevating equipment, installing appropriate devices/retrofits, flood-proofing basements, and protecting well-heads).
Encourage private owners to install islanding capability with storage so their new or existing grid-connected renewable energy systems can provide back-up power during grid outages. Develop a campaign with incentives and/or financing options (such as PACE), and report successful private installation(s) attributable to this campaign.
Develop an incentive program (e.g., reducing development fees, providing low-cost financing, or offering regulatory flexibility) for private building owners to reduce urban heat and increase resilience. Report successful private installations, attributable to the program, which include any of the following: (a) cooling and reflective surfaces such as cool/green roofs, cool pavements, and plantings of meaningful numbers of resilient tree species and increased areas of vegetative cover; (b) systems to reduce/reuse waste heat; (c) distributed systems (i.e., clean energy, water capture/reuse, or natural wastewater treatment systems) intended also to provide back-up/continuity of operations during extreme weather.

Fridley

Date action report first entered:   12/13/2016
Date of last report update:   12/13/2016
Year action initially completed:   2016
Action completed after joining GreenStep?   Yes

Implementation details:
The City of Fridley held a first-time, themed, community engagement event in Commons Park, centrally located in Fridley, on April 29th for Arbor Day 2016. This Best Practice 29 Sponsored Event informed residents about the integral role that green infrastructure plays in the health and resiliency of a city, while teaching skills in the selection, siting, planting, and pruning of trees to reduce energy use, intercept stormwater, avoid extreme weather damage, and resist pests. The event featured community tree planting of resilient species in the park, and homeowner purchase of low-cost bare-root trees.

Outcome measures/metrics:
Approximately 40-50 people, including many students, participated all morning while homeowners came and went throughout the event. Ten trees were sold to homeowners. A resident from the city’s immigrant community agreed to participate on the Tree Board. The City created “Tree Trek” to demonstrate types of trees beyond ash and maple for residents to plant. Several additional tree species were added to Commons Park.

For more information contact:
Rachel Workin (City staff)   |   rachel.workin@fridleymn.gov   |   763-572-3594

View All Fridley Actions

Hutchinson

Date action report first entered:   12/14/2016
Date of last report update:   12/14/2016
Year action initially completed:   2016
Action completed after joining GreenStep?   Yes

Implementation details:
The City of Hutchinson held a Kickoff Event, supported in part with a Best Practice 29 Event Sponsorship, on April 21, 2016 to promote resilience to the changing climate/energy landscape for multi-family and commercial buildings through free benchmarking assistance from the MN ENERGY STAR Challenge. Participants learned about Hutchinson’s resilience efforts including burying power lines, buying up and relocating/demolishing properties located within the 100-year flood areas, tracking and reducing the city’s energy consumption, offering PACE financing, providing energy efficiency rebates through the local utility, and partnering on the MN ENERGY STAR Challenge.

Outcome measures/metrics:
Approximately 20 people attended on short notice during a busy Earth Week. The event was covered by the local news station, HCVN Channel 10. Two businesses signed up at the event for the Challenge to ENERGY STAR certify their buildings, and five more signed up within the next few weeks.

For more information contact:
John Paulson (City staff)   |   jpaulson@ci.hutchinson.mn.us   |   320-234-5682

Partners:
USGBC Minnesota, Minnesota Energy Smart

View All Hutchinson Actions

La Prairie

Date action report first entered:   12/13/2016
Date of last report update:   12/13/2016
Year action initially completed:   2016
Action completed after joining GreenStep?   Yes

Implementation details:
Six trained volunteers spent four hours replacing 100 fluorescent T8 and T12 bulbs with LED bulbs, and four traditional thermostats with programmable thermostats in the City office, shop and warming house, as part of a Best Practice 29 Sponsored Event. This effort was followed by a community-wide event in Ryan Park on June 23, 2016 (in conjunction with the farmers’ market and a youth baseball game) to promote the City’s biking/walking trails, farmers’ market, energy retrofit cost savings and environmental impact, Firewise tips, extreme weather resilience and mitigation information, community solar gardens, and GreenStep call to action for next steps with GreenStep committee to make Best Practice 29 ideas for climate adaptation and community resilience a reality.

Outcome measures/metrics:
The city retrofit will save 85,000 Kwh over the life of the bulbs, which is the same as GHG emissions from 12.6 passenger vehicles driven for one year or 6,722 gallons of gasoline consumed. At least 100 people attended the event and engaged on these topics. Support was fostered leading up to the event and momentum for more action was created moving forward.

For more information contact:
Lynn O'Brien (Elected official)   |   laprcity@paulbunyan.net   |   218-326-8898

View All La Prairie Actions

Saint Louis Park

Date action report first entered:   11/01/2016
Date of last report update:   11/01/2016

Implementation details:
"Ready and Resilient: A Guide to Extreme Weather" was prepared by the City using the Macalester College brochure as a model. Print copies were distributed during a community-wide workshop in August 2015 and mailed to city residents. City staff tabulated results of an on-line/printed survey. The August public event included presentations by Dr. Mark Seeley and Patrick Hamilton on the current state of Minnesota's climate and changes that have been observed and are expected in the future.

Outcome measures/metrics:
12 questions were asked in both the paper and online surveys. Each question had a risk factor based on the answer provided. Questions ranged from a health focus to current conditions in the home as well as preparedness status. City staff plans to use information from the survey to target more specific messaging and education on resiliency and preparedness.

Descriptive links: https://www.stlouispark.org/sustainability/climate-resilience-information.html

For more information contact:
Shannon Pinc (City staff)   |   spinc@stlouispark.org   |   952-924-2191

Partners:
MPCA

View All Saint Louis Park Actions

pending means a star rating has not yet been assigned to this city


 
greenstep advisor
Laura Millberg, MBA, LEED AP BD+C, Sustainable Development and Climate Resilience Principal Planner, MN Pollution Control Agency: 651/757-2568, Laura.Millberg@state.mn.us, https://www.pca.state.mn.us/quick-links/community-resilience