City Detail

Background Information

City of White Bear Lake
County: Washington,Ramsey
Population: 24087
GreenStep City category: A
Full-time equivalent city staff (approx.): 164
Participating township, county, school:

GreenStep Coordinator

Connie Taillon
City Staff
651-429-8564
City web page relating to sustainability/GreenStep activities:
GreenStep City resolution: Click here to view the file.
GreenStep City status and date: STEP 4 ( )

City Assessment Files and City Performance Metrics

City councils pass a resolution to join the GreenStep program and are recognized at Step 1. Step 2 and Step 3 recognition levels reflect completed city actions, reported and rated below with stars (1 star = good, 2 stars = better, 3 stars = best). The Assessment File below summarizes completed city actions in a short Word file. Step 4 recognition is awarded to cities who report a minimum number of core metrics for the previous calendar year. These metrics aim to show the aggregate, quantitative results of taking multiple GreenStep actions. Step 5 cities show improvement in the Step 4 metrics. See yearly data for Steps 4&5. Additional city data can be found by reviewing information on B3 Benchmarking and Regional Indicators Initiative.

Assessment File

Best Practice Actions Underway and Completed

Completed actions are denoted by stars.

Total completed actions: 58
1 star actions: 23
2 star actions: 21
3 star actions: 8

Buildings and Lighting Buildings and Lighting

Efficient Existing Public Buildings {BP no.1}

2 star - Action 1:

Enter building information into the Minnesota B3 Benchmarking database and routinely enter monthly energy, water use data for all city-owned buildings.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Complete information for all city-owned buildings has been entered into B3 Building Editor. Monthly energy use data is entered by White Bear Lake staff. All buildings have 24 consecutive months of historical data. The City has been reviewing energy use data on a quarterly basis with all building leads, and uses information to determine if building specific changes need to be made.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
2 star - Action 2:

Make no/low cost indoor lighting and operational changes in city-owned/school buildings to reduce energy costs.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
City Hall was re-lamped in 2010. Switched from 58w T8 lighting to 43w T8 lighting. Installed motion sensors in restrooms, breakroom. Replaced exit signs with LED 4w signs.
Estimated savings were 13,831kWh, 25,513 CO2 (lbs), and $1,122.66 annually.

Re-lamped Public Safety building in 2010.
Re-lamped the Police Dispatch area with lower wattage T8s and some CFL dimmable lights. Replaced remaining T12s lights with T8s.
Estimated savings were 27,672 kWh, 64,042 CO2(lbs) and $2,679.87 annually.


Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
Center for Energy and the Environment; Class 5 Energy
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
1 star - Action 3:

Invest in larger energy efficiency projects through performance contracting or other funding or through smaller retro-commissioning/retrofit projects in city-owned/school buildings.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City replaced the condenser fans at the Sports Center to more energy efficient model in June 2012, see document attached.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
2 star - Action 4:

Implement information technology efforts and city employee engagement to reduce plug loads, building energy use and workflow efficiency.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City is piloting a behavioral-based energy reduction program with Class 5 Energy. The pilot began in the summer of 2012. The pilot provides signs and communication templates for the City to use to communicate with employees about saving energy. The City has utilized these. The City has begun sending out email communication monthly to all employees with information about how they can save energy in the work place. The City also creates an Energy Newsletter for employees, attached. The City sends out email reminders sporadically to all city employees reminding them to shut down their computers and monitors at the end of the day. The City is in the process of implementing an internal Energy Policy that will significantly reduce plug loads and building energy use. The policy should be adopted by 2014. The City has hosted two seminars for employees about how they can save energy at work, and at home.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
1 star - Action 5:

Document that the new construction or major remodeling of a public building has met the SB 2030 energy standard or has met or qualified under a green building or energy framework.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City's new public works building was constructed to the equivalent of LEED silver. The City did not apply for actual certification because of the cost to be certified. This building opened in 2010.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564

Efficient Existing Private Buildings {BP no.2}

2 star - Action 1:

Create or participate in a marketing/outreach/incentive program to promote/achieve residential energy/water use reduction and energy efficiency.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City promotes the Neighborhood Energy Connection programs provided through Xcel Energy, including energy audits at a reduced price for Xcel customer, and the Home Energy Squad. Pamphlets and information sheets about these programs are available and on display at City Hall.

In Spring, 2013, the City hosted two residential energy use reduction and efficiency seminars for City employees. The first seminar presented information on energy reduction and efficiency programs available through Xcel Energy. The second seminar focused on how to read your residential utility bill.

City website provides links to residential energy use reduction and efficiency resources.

In 2011, the City completed its Rambler Revolution Demonstration Project. One aspect of the City’s Rambler Revolution Project, was to demonstrate to the public simple energy enhancements in a post-WWII rambler. The City held four open houses, where the public toured the home before, during, and after the improvements were made. Information about the project, and a section dedicated to Green Building Strategies is available online, on a website specifically for the project. http://www.ramblerrevolution.com/index.html. The City’s website provides a link to this website.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
1 star - Action 2:

Integrate green building best practices information and assistance into the building permit process.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City discusses green building practices if an applicant inquires.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
2 star - Action 4:

Describe energy/water efficiency outcomes and other green building practices at businesses located within/nearby the city.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The city, in collaboration with the Food Service Energy Leadership Program (housed at Eureka Recycling), applied and received a competitively selected Energy Efficiency Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) through the Department of Energy and administered by the Minnesota Division of Energy Resources. This grant, funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), allowed the city to provide technical assistance for energy efficiency among its restaurant community.
The program worked with 20 restaurants in the White Bear Lake area over a two year period. An initial energy assessment was completed by the technical team and a report produced with identified opportunities (focusing mostly on low-cost options). Throughout the course of two years of collaboration with these businesses, energy use was tracked and reported back to the businesses on a six month basis, and assistance was offered with larger retrofit projects, such as an HVACunit replacement, a new ice machine purchase, or a retrofit on the exhaust hood.
Overall, most businesses had 10-15 percent potential energy savings identified based on the initial walkthrough. The implementation of energy saving measures was left to the business, but on the whole recommendations were implemented. Over the two year period, the average energy savings in participating restaurants was 5.8 percent. These savings varied greatly depending on length of time in the program and ability to commit time, attention and money to making improvements.
By way of communicating the variety of actions participants took, and the variety of successes businesses had, this case study will briefly highlight the efforts of three White Bear Lake restaurants. More ideas, tips, case studies, and resources can be found at food.mncerts.org.
The Hanger Room
Getting started with energy efficiency needn’t be costly. Every business has opportunities for improved maintenance, repair, and changes in behaviors which cost nothing or almost nothing and save energy. The Hanger Room provides a great example of how simply paying attention to equipment and energy use can make great strides toward becoming more efficient.
Co-owners, Nick Miller and Peter Martinson chose a former bowling alley as the site for a new high-end restaurant. When considering the location, they looked into the energy use of the bowling alley. However, once they had added a larger commercial kitchen, complete with lots of equipment and a full wall of exhaust hoods, plus some additional refrigeration space, their energy use was different. According to Martinson, “Energy use in this building was a big surprise. We looked at the bowling alley’s energy use before buying the building, but our use is much higher.”
The owners needed to find a way to reduce energy costs without spending more money on new equipment or controls (a common situation for owners of new restaurants). Luckily, there were excellent opportunities to reduce their energy use that didn’t cost a penny.
Miller and Martinson set their programmable thermostats setbacks more aggressively, not only for occupied and unoccupied, but also for busy and slow times in the restaurant, zoning off areas that didn’t need to be heated or cooled until the dinner rush.
The other big saving action they took was to reduce exhaust hood runtime in the kitchen. Together with the head chef they implemented a plan where only one hood runs on slow days, and even then only when there is equipment beneath it running. Staff leadership has been important to the success of this strategy. Martinson says, “The chef has been the leader in the kitchen, working to keep equipment off until it’s needed. If we’re really slow, we don’t need extra equipment on. Sometimes two cooks will just share a stove.”
For a new restaurant establishing a baseline to compare energy savings is difficult. But Martinson and Miller are certain the small changes they have made are saving them money each month.
Dellwood Hills
Dellwood Hills, an area golf course and restaurant, was enthusiastic to reduce monthly expenses by saving energy. Like most country clubs, the economic recession of 2008 left the club extra conscious of the need to run efficiently.
Ken Galloway, the General Manager of Dellwood Hills, was pleased to get some new ideas and support from the city energy efficiency program. “We’ve always tried to work efficiently and take advantage of programs and technology; but it’s so much more helpful and easier to embrace when you can get assistance from qualified people.”
Dellwood Hills will be retrofitting all of their inefficient T12 lighting to more efficient fluorescent lamps. Their timing coincides with Xcel Energy offering additional rebates because of the federal legislation phasing out T12 lighting. The lighting retrofit at Dellwood Hills will save the business over $7,700 per year, resulting in a project payback of less than one year. This project qualified for a rebate from Xcel Energy of almost $6,000, nearly 50% of the project cost.
In addition to lighting retrofits, Galloway has been talking to his staff about how they can help reduce energy use in various aspects of their job. Galloway suggests, “The key is to make energy savings real for them.” For instance, helping employees identify that leaving a door open wastes energy is more useful than telling them to “save energy.”
Sam Thai Cuisine
Little restaurants can save energy too. Sam Thai Cuisine, a tiny restaurant in a strip mall in White Bear Lake, doesn’t use a lot of energy to begin with, but after participating in the program they are more aware of energy use and have taken action to be even more efficient.
Sombat “Sam” Supunniam owns Sam Thai Cuisine, where he serves as head cook, dishwasher, repairman, cashier and friendly greeter. Despite using much less energy overall than the average restaurant, Supunniam still found ways to further reduce his energy usage.
Replacing gaskets, shutting off equipment and adjusting the thermostats were easy changes. Installing motion detectors on the bathroom lights made sense, since the bathrooms were infrequently used during the day. Supunniam appreciated the technical support, he said, “based on the auditor’s recommendation we realized the right direction to be working. We wanted to save energy because it’s the right thing to do, but for my small restaurant saving money is the most important.”
In fact, running such a small place allows Supunniam to arrange some creative agreements with contractors. “One of my customers said he could fix my lights, and I said that if he did, I would pay him in free lunches,” said Supunniam describing his arrangement that allowed him to retrofit old T12 lighting.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
Food Service Energy Leadership Program (housed at Eureka Recycling)
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
2 star - Action 5:

Conserve/protect drinking/groundwater resources by creating a water-wise landscaping ordinance/guidance, WaterSense purchasing program, or guidance on rainwater harvesting and home water softener use.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City adopted a watering ordinance in 2007. The City is also a WaterSense promotional member. The City participated in the National Mayor’s Challenge to Save Water by Wyland Foundation and received 4th place nationally.

The watering ordinance can be found on the City website, in the Municipal Code 401.120.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564

Efficient Outdoor Lighting and Signals {BP no.4}

3 star - Action 4:

Coordinate traffic signals and/or optimize signal timing so as minimize car idling at intersections yet maintain safe and publicly acceptable vehicle speeds.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
All City traffic signals are synchronized by MNDot. Flashing yellow signals will be installed in 2014 project by MNDot along Trunk Highway U.S. 61. Loop detectors are installed in majority of signals.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
2 star - Action 5:

Use LED/solar-powered lighting for a flashing sign or in a street, parking lot or park project.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Pedestrian crossing sign on Highway 96 N is flashing, LED and solar-powered.

City Hall and Public Works parking lot lights are LED. City Hall flag pole is LED.

LED street lights will be installed on Lake Avenue South from Whitaker Street to Highway U.S. 61 in 2014.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
2 star - Action 8:

Replace the city's existing traffic signals with LEDs.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
All traffic signals on Highway 61 are LED.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564

Building Redevelopment {BP no.5}

1 star - Action 2:

Implement the Minnesota Main Street model for commercial revitalization.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
White Bear Lake has a traditional downtown area. The City established a Special Service District in downtown White Bear Lake in 1992. A portion of the Special Service District funds are allocated to a program for property owners within the district, called Downtown White Bear Lake. Downtown White Bear Lake is a non-profit organization formed to serve the promotion and development needs of this special service district, aimed at revitalizing the community’s commercial core. Membership is voluntary and its members are committed to promotional efforts and special event coordination. The organization also strives to improve the quality and diversity of business by encouraging a wide variety of economic, cultural and recreational opportunities. Downtown White Bear Lake seeks to generate excitement and activity while building a strong business image through a combined effort from businesses, services and community residents now and in the future.

The City promotes Downtown White Bear Lake by providing a link on the official city website, and also participates in a 50/50 cost share to fund a promotional banner program in the downtown area.

The City also established a Revolving Loan Grant Program (RLGP) aimed at improving the utility and appearance of downtown businesses while encouraging the leveraging of private investment which would otherwise not occur. The program provides front-end financing for small loans at below market interest rates for up to a 10-year term.

The White Bear Lake RLGP established a public/private partnership where an initial $150,000 public loan/grant pool was made available by the White Bear Lake Housing and Redevelopment Authority (the “HRA”) to assist downtown businesses to make eligible physical improvements. The program is designed to address redevelopment needs in the City’s redevelopment project area. Although the White Bear Lake RLGP is targeted toward downtown businesses, all existing businesses within the City’s project area (see attached boundary map) are eligible to participate in the loan program.
Outcome measures/metrics:
A link to Downtown White Bear Lake can be found on the city's official website, under the Community Links section.

A link to the official City ordinance that established the Special Service district can be found on the City's official website, in the Municipal Code, within Article V.

RLGP information is attached as an action file.
Descriptive File: view file
Downtown White Bear Lake; White Bear Lake Area Economic Development Corporation
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
3 star - Action 4:

Create/modify a green residential remodeling assistance/financing program to assist homeowners in adding space to their existing homes.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City sponsored the wildly successful Rambler Revolution Demonstration Project, located at 3790 McKnight Road in White Bear Lake, was to show the public creative and affordable possibilities for renovating a post-WWII rambler. The City's hope has been that the project educated homeowners about the design, permitting and construction process. The goal has been to provide examples of how to remodel a rambler-style, three bedroom house of 1,000 sq. ft. or less by opening up the floorplan to create a spacious and inviting great room feel, with a more functional kitchen, generous master bedroom, and energy enhancements. The City held four open houses, where the public toured the home before, during, and after the improvements were made.
A website was created for the public to learn about the Rambler Revolution Demonstration Project, and one of the main sections of the website is dedicated to green building strategies. These green building strategies are also promoted on the City's official website.

Additionally, the City of White Bear Lake has teamed up with Ramsey County and the Minnesota Housing Finance Agency to promote several loans available to homeowners for general repairs, energy improvements, and necessary fixes. Most loans have qualifications, such as income level, that designate who can receive the loans. These loans are promoted on the City’s website.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
Neighborhood Energy Connection; Minnesota Housing Finance Agency; Ramsey County
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
Pending - Action 5:

Adopt development/design standards and programs that facilitate infill, redevelopment, and adaptable buildings.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City has not adopted any development and design standards that facilitate infill and redevelopment, but we would be open to considering any model standards that encourage building re-use.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564

Land Use Land Use

Comprehensive, Climate and Energy Plans {BP no.6}

2 star - Action 1:

Adopt a comprehensive plan or (for Category B & C cities) adopt a future land use plan that was adopted by the county or a regional entity.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City of White Bear Lake's adopted a revised and updated Comprehensive Plan in 2008.
One of three guiding principles in the City's Comprehensive Plan is sustainability. See Comprehensive Plan, Introduction, Page 16. for sustainability section.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
2 star - Action 2:

Demonstrate that regulatory ordinances comply with the comprehensive plan including but not limited to having the zoning ordinance explicitly reference the comprehensive plan as the foundational document for decision making.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City of White Bear Lake's comprehensive plan is referenced as the foundational document in the city's zoning code. The comprehensive plan is referenced in all land use and development ordinances and regulations, with the exception of the Sign Code and Subdivision Regulations.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
3 star - Action 3:

Include requirements in comprehensive and/or other plans for intergovernmental coordination addressing regional land use and watershed / wellhead impacts, infrastructure, transportation, economic development and city/regional services.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Comprehensive Plan includes requirements on coordinated action with other jurisdictions in the following issues: land use, watershed impacts, transportation, water and sewer, housing and foreclosures, and health. (See the Comprehensive Plan for various references).

The City convenes discussions and provides services for neighboring communities in the following areas: land use, water and sewer, police, and fire.

Land use: The City of White Bear Lake's building department provides services to neighboring communities of Birchwood and Mahtomedi. Additionally, the city is frequently in conversation with adjacent municipalities and relevant agencies in regards to land use projects which concern them.

Water and Sewer: White Bear Township and Vadnais Heights provide water and sewer to part of the city, and the city provides water and sewer services to areas of Mahtomedi, and water services to Birchwood Village.

Police: We provide police service to Birchwood Village.

Fire: We provide protection services to Gem Lake, Birchwood, White Bear Township, and Dellwood. We provide commercial inspection services for Gem Lake and White Bear Township.

The City also jointly invests in infrastructure with relevant state and federal agencies, municipalities and counties to avoid duplication and improve performance of infrastructure. This occurs on various street projects, as well as other areas. See Implementation section of Comprehensive Plan, page 5, that requires intergovernmental cooperation.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564

Resilient City Growth {BP no.7}

1 star - Action 1:

Limit barriers to higher density housing by including in the city zoning ordinance and zoning map:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Several older, existing, neighborhoods in White Bear Lake were built at 6.3, 6.5 and as much as 6.8 units per acre. The highest density, single-family zoning district, in the city is R-4 at 6 units per acre. The highest density, multi-family zoning district in the city is R-7 at up to 17 units per acre.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Zoning code can be found on city website.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
1 star - Action 2:

Achieve higher density housing through at least two of the following strategies:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The city encourages higher density housing by allowing use density and floor ratio bonuses.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
1 star - Action 3:

Achieve higher intensity commercial/industrial land uses through at least one of the following strategies:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Reduced lot sizes and zero-lot-line setbacks are utilized in B-5 District and LVMU District.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
Pending - Action 4:

Provide incentives for infill projects, or for life-cycle housing at or near job or retail centers, or for achieving an average net residential density of seven units per acre.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City offers tax-increment financing and other loan/grant tools:

-The City of White Bear Lake has 28 Tax-Increment Finance Districts.

-The City is part of a Revolving Loan Grant Program. The RLGP is aimed at improving the utility and appearance of downtown businesses
while encouraging the leveraging of private investment which would otherwise not occur. The
program provides front-end financing for small loans at below market interest rates for up to a
10-year term. (See web link).

-The City promotes several home loans to increase energy efficiency. The loans are not administered through City funds. (See attachment)

Currently, the City does not provide incentive for infill projects, but doing so is a goal of the Comprehensive Plan.

Outcome measures/metrics:
To read more about the Revolving Loan Program, go to White Bear Lake website > Departments Facilities & Services > Community Development/Planning Department > HRA Revolving Loan and Grant Program Guidelines and Regulations Handbook
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564

Mixed Uses {BP no.8}

1 star - Action 1:

Organize or participate in a community planning/design process for the city/a mixed use district.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City established a Special Service District in downtown White Bear Lake in 1992. A portion of the Special Service District funds are allocated to a program for property owners within the district, called Downtown White Bear Lake. Downtown White Bear Lake is a non-profit organization formed to serve the promotion and development needs of this special service district, aimed at revitalizing the community’s commercial core. Membership is voluntary and its members are committed to promotional efforts and special event coordination. The organization also strives to improve the quality and diversity of business by encouraging a wide variety of economic, cultural and recreational opportunities. Downtown White Bear Lake seeks to generate excitement and activity while building a strong business image through a combined effort from businesses, services and community residents now and in the future.
The City promotes Downtown White Bear Lake by providing a link on the official city website, and also participates in a 50/50 cost share to fund a promotional banner program in the downtown area.
Outcome measures/metrics:
A link to Downtown White Bear Lake can be found on the city's official website, under the Community Links section.

A link to the official City ordinance that established the Special Service district can be found on the City's official website, in the Municipal Code, within Article V.
Descriptive File:
Downtown White Bear Lake organization
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
2 star - Action 2:

Locate or lease a school, city building or other government facility that has at least two of these attributes:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
City Hall and the Public Safety building (houses police, dispatch center, and fire station) are located next to several stores and restaurants on U.S. 61. Additionally, across U.S. 61 is downtown. These city buildings were designed to facilitate access by walking, and biking, as well as regular transit service: there are easily accessible sidewalks on U.S. 61 for biking and walking to the City Hall and Public Safety building. Additionally, there is a bus stop that is serviced regularly directly in front of City Hall on U.S. 61.

Several city employees live close to the building they work in, and take advantage of this by walking to work. At City Hall and Public Safety Building (4701 U.S. 61, White Bear Lake), to meet the typical parking standard should have 65 parking spots, and actually only has 58, 11% less than normal.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
3 star - Action 5:

Have a downtown zoning district that allows residential and compatible commercial development.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City has a specific downtown zoning district, so there is no need to create a special overlay district. In this downtown district, mixed use of office, retail, educational, civic, and residential use is allowed within the same building.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
3 star - Action 7:

Create incentives for vertical mixed-use development in appropriate locations (downtown, commercial districts near colleges or universities, historic commercial districts).

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City provides density bonuses for including affordable housing in a project in R-6 and R-7.

Overall goals for mixed use are guided through the City comprehensive plan.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564

Design for Natural Resource Conservation {BP no.10}

Pending - Action 3:

For cities within metropolitan areas, incorporate woodland best management practices addressing protection of wooded areas into zoning or development review.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
City has a tree preservation ordinance that can be found in the city zoning code.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564

Transportation Transportation

Living Streets {BP no.11}

1 star - Action 1:

Adopt a complete streets policy, or a living streets policy, which addresses landscaping and stormwater.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Resolution 11378, Resolution Supporting the Development of a Complete Streets Policy and Implementation Plan, was passed by City Council on April 22, 2014. The resolution is supported by staff and environmental commission, and also specifically addresses street trees and storm water.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
2 star - Action 3:

Modify a street in compliance with the city's complete streets policy.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City has added sidewalks, trails and bike lanes. Sidewalk added on a non-complete street, on Hazel Avenue in between busy County Road E and Cedar Avenue. The City added a trail on McKnight Road that attaches to several other trails that wind through Lakewood Hills Park. The City added a bike lane on Bel Air Avenue and County Road D, a wide rural section overal, by changing the striping and narrowing lanes to allow for a 6 foot wide bike lane on both sides.

The City has installed 34 rain gardens since 2007, 27 are residential, and 7 are in city parks and are maintained by the cite.

As part of any street reconstruction project, any trees that are taken down are replaced usually on a 2:1 ratio.

The City installed a porous asphalt paved parking lot in Lions Park.

The City installed a stor mwater capture and reuse system in Lakewood Hills Park to irrigate the softball fields.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
2 star - Action 4:

Identify, prioritize and remedy complete streets gaps and lack of connectivity/safety within your road network by, for example, adding a bike route/lane, truck route, sidewalk or mid-block alley.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Certain complete street gaps have been rememedied. The City has mapped out all sidewalks, bicycle lanes, and trails located in the City and has evaluated where they are needed. This map/plan is included in the Comprehensive Plan.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
2 star - Action 5:

Identify and remedy street-trail gaps between city streets and off-road trails/bike trails to better facilitate walking and biking.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
A bike lane was added on Bel Air and County Road D that connects open space areas. A sidewalk was added on Hazel Avenue to connect schools. A trail has been added to McKnight Road to connect the trail to Lakewood Park.
The City plans on expanding the trail on McKnight to go over 694, and connect the city to Maplewood trails.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
1 star - Action 6:

Implement traffic calming policy/measures, including lane conversions (road diets), roundabouts, shared space and depaving, in at least one street redevelopment project.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Certain roads were built as curved roads - the City has repaved all of these roads, to make them straight, and has reclaimed a lot of paved area because of this.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564

Mobility Options {BP no.12}

1 star - Action 1:

Increase walking, biking and transit use by one or more of the following means:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City has promoted and distributed a White Bear biking routes map.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
Pending - Action 2:

Conduct an Active Living campaign such as a Safe Routes to School program.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City has applied for a Safe Routes to School grant on two separate occasions, but due to the competitive nature of this grant, has not received funding.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
3 star - Action 3:

Prominently identify mobility options: transit; paratransit/Dial-A-Ride; ridesharing/cab services; rental cars; bikes; airports.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Public mobility options are displayed on the City's website. They can be found under Community Links.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564

Efficient City Fleets {BP no.13}

1 star - Action 3:

Phase-in no-idling practices, operational and fuel changes, and equipment changes including electric vehicles, for city or local transit fleets.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
All City vehicle fuel consumption and associated costs is monitored and tracked in a spreadsheet shared with all City staff. Vehicle mileage is also tracked weekly, ensuring oil changes are kept up to date. All vehicle repairs are also tracked in this same spreadsheet. All of this information is shared with the fleet manager, and users of the vehicles.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
1 star - Action 4:

Phase in bike, e-bike, foot or horseback modes for police, inspectors and other city staff.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The city does not have bike or horseback patrol, but our officers do a considerable amount of foot patrol during the good weather. There is no dedicated “foot patrol” shift, but every day someone is out on foot in a specific area or in underground apartment garages etc, conducting foot patrol – in addition to the foot patrol at City events, Marketfest and Manitou Days.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564

Environmental Management Environmental Management

Sustainable Purchasing {BP no.15}

1 star - Action 1:

Adopt a sustainable purchasing policy or administrative guidelines/practices directing that the city purchase at least:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City adopted an EPP policy on 4/22/2013. The policy encourages an increase in purchasing that reflects the City's commitment to sustainability and includes areas that relate to 1. Recycled Paper Products and Recycled-Content Products 2. Waste Minimization 3. Energy Saving Products 4. Water Saving Products and 5. Cleaning Products.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
1 star - Action 4:

Require purchase of U.S. EPA WaterSense-certified products.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City adopted an Environment Purchasing Policy on April 22, 2014 that includes a provision that water-saving products purchased by the City will meet the WaterSense certification when such products are available and financially feasible.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564

Urban Forests and Soils {BP no.16}

3 star - Action 5:

Adopt a tree preservation or native landscaping ordinance.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City adopted a Tree Preservation Ordinance. The ordinance is attached.

In zoning code, ordinance is 1302.075.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
2 star - Action 6:

Build community capacity to protect existing trees by one or more of:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Three city staff are MN Certified Tree Inspectors.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564

Stormwater Management {BP no.17}

1 star - Action 3:

Adopt by ordinance one or more of the following stormwater infiltration/management strategies:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City has not adopted any ordinances on these storm water management provisions. The City meets watershed requirements of 1 inch rainfall on-site rainwater infiltration.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
1 star - Action 5:

Adopt and implement guidelines or design standards/incentives for at least one of the following stormwater infiltration/reuse practices:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City has a coal tar ban in place. The City will consider green alley development when it does street reconstruction projects in the downtown area within the next few years.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564

Parks and Trails {BP no.18}

2 star - Action 1:

Make improvements within your city's system of parks, offroad trails and open spaces.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City has remedied at least 3 connectivity breaks.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
Pending - Action 2:

Plan and budget for a network of parks, green spaces, water features and trails for areas where new development is planned.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Currently, there are 10 acres of green space per 1000 residents, and 90% of residents live less that 1/2 mile from a park.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
3 star - Action 3:

Achieve minimum levels of city green space and maximize the percent within a ten-minute walk of community members.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Currently, there are 10 acres of green space per 1000 residents, and 90% of residents live less that 1/2 mile from a park.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
1 star - Action 8:

Develop a program to involve community members in hands-on land restoration and stewardship projects.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Arbor Day is a very active day in White Bear Lake. Dozens and dozens of residents come out and help plant trees, and clean up the city parks.
Over the years, several groups of volunteers have been involved in maintaining the rain gardens within the City.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564

Surface Water {BP no.19}

1 star - Action 3:

Adopt and report on measurable, publicly announced surface water improvement targets for water bodies, including the percent of lake, river, wetland and ditch shoreline with at least a 50-foot vegetation buffer.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City follows TMDL requirements of its 4 watersheds, and regularly works toward improving water quality, and reducing our load. TMDL loads are reported to the public in the City's storm water pollution prevention program. Water quality communication and education is provided to residents in the storm water pollution prevention program, as well as in our bi-annual environmental newsletter.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
1 star - Action 4:

Adopt a shoreland ordinance for all river and lake shoreland areas; reduce flooding and costs through The National Flood Insurance Program's Community Rating System.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City has a shoreland overlay district.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564

Local Air Quality {BP no.23}

1 star - Action 2:

Regulate outdoor wood burning, using ordinance language, performance standards and bans as appropriate, for at least one of the following:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City regulates recreational outdoor wood burning through the attached ordinance.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564

Resilient Economic & Community Development Resilient Economic and Community Development

Benchmarks and Community Engagement {BP no.24}

2 star - Action 1:

Use a city commission, or committee to lead, coordinate, and report to and engage community members on implementation of sustainability best practices.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City of White Bear Lake Environmental Advisory Commission provides guidance for City's participation in the Minnesota Green Step Cities. The City's website provides information about involvement in GreenStep Cities.
GreenStep Cities will provide resdient's information about the city's completed best practices at the City's Environmental Resource Fair in the summer of 2013.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
2 star - Action 2:

Organize goals/outcome measures from all city plans and report to community members data that show progress toward meeting these goals.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The city reports goals/outcomes in an annual budget report that is available on the city’s website. The 2014 budget, for example, reports 2011 and 2012 performance results, 2013 performance criteria, and establishes 2014 benchmarks and goals. Goals are focused on priorities set forth in the City’s Strategic Plan which is updated every 3-5 years, as well as requests from residents and the Mayor and City Council. Performance indicators are detailed in the operating budgets of each department. The City Manager presents the budget report at December City Council meeting annually, which is open to the public, and also broadcasted on the city’s cable channel.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
2 star - Action 3:

Measure and report progress on sustainability indicators including energy use/greenhouse gas emissions, social vitality/social inclusion outcome measures.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City is participating in the Regional Indicators Initiative. The Regional Indicators Initiative measures annual performance metrics for approximately 30 Minnesota cities committed to increasing their overall efficiency and level of sustainability. The project collects the following data generated through the activities of the people who live, work, learn, travel, visit, and recreate within the city’s geographical boundaries:
• Energy (in BTUs): electricity, natural gas, and district energy consumed.
• Water (in gallons): potable water consumed.
• Waste (in pounds): municipal solid waste managed via recycling, composting, combustion, and landfilling.
• Travel (in Vehicle Miles Traveled): on-road distance traveled

The greenhouse gas emissions associated with each of these measures is also calculated, providing a common metric to compare the environmental impacts of the indicators. The indicators are expressed not only as annual totals, but are also broken down into residential and commercial/industrial uses, and are presented in terms of per capita and per job, enabling them to be compared over time. The Initiative supports planning for sustainability by defining a baseline, tracking a business-as-usual trajectory, establishing targets, and measuring outcomes of sustainable strategies at a city-wide scale.

The City's Environmental Advisory Commission supported the City's participation in this program, and made a recommendation to the City Council that the City participate.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
Urban Land Institute
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564

Green Business Development {BP no.25}

Not rated - Action 1:

Grow new/emerging green businesses and green jobs through targeted assistance and new workforce development.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Business assistance efforts:
In 2009, the City, in collaboration with the Food Service Energy Leadership Program (housed at Eureka Recycling), applied and received a competitively selected Energy Efficiency Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) through the Department of Energy and administered by the Minnesota Division of Energy Resources. This grant, funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), allowed the city to provide technical assistance for energy efficiency among its restaurant community.

The program worked with 20 restaurants in the White Bear Lake area over a two year period. An initial energy assessment was completed by the technical team and a report produced with identified opportunities (focusing mostly on low-cost options). Throughout the course of two years of collaboration with these businesses, energy use was tracked and reported back to the businesses on a six month basis, and assistance was offered with larger retrofit projects, such as an HVAC unit replacement, a new ice machine purchase, or a retrofit on the exhaust hood. Over the two year period, the average energy savings in participating restaurants was 5.8 percent. These savings varied greatly depending on length of time in the program and ability to commit time, attention and money to making improvements.

In 2013, the City partnered with the White Bear Area Chamber of Commerce to help promote and host two seminars for businesses to divert waste from landfills while saving money on their trash bills. The seminars are led by Minnesota WasteWise, and businesses are given an opportunity to schedule a private visit by Minnesota WasteWise to analyze their waste streams and receive recommendations on how they can divert waste, properly dispose of problem materials, and save money. Minnesota WasteWise holds a contract with Ramsey County and will provide free waste consulting for any business within the county.

The City is currently partnering with CLASS 5 Energy on an energy reduction pilot program via a state-funded grant. Phase two of the pilot was for Class 5 to partner with businesses in the community of White Bear Lake to explore appropriate strategies for use in different types of business settings. The City sent a letter out to White Bear Area Chamber businesses inviting them to attend a meeting at City Hall to learn more about how they could reducing their energy use and costs through participating in the pilot.
To date, eight local businesses are participating in the pilot with Class 5.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
Food Service Energy Leadership Program (housed at Eureka Recycling); Minnesota Division of Energy Resources; Minnesota WasteWise; Class 5 Energy
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
2 star - Action 2:

Create or participate in a marketing/outreach program to connect businesses with assistance providers, including utilities, who provide personalized energy, waste or sustainability audits and assistance.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Business assistance efforts:
In 2009, the City, in collaboration with the Food Service Energy Leadership Program (housed at Eureka Recycling), applied and received a competitively selected Energy Efficiency Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) through the Department of Energy and administered by the Minnesota Division of Energy Resources. This grant, funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA), allowed the city to provide technical assistance for energy efficiency among its restaurant community.

The program worked with 20 restaurants in the White Bear Lake area over a two year period. An initial energy assessment was completed by the technical team and a report produced with identified opportunities (focusing mostly on low-cost options). Throughout the course of two years of collaboration with these businesses, energy use was tracked and reported back to the businesses on a six month basis, and assistance was offered with larger retrofit projects, such as an HVAC unit replacement, a new ice machine purchase, or a retrofit on the exhaust hood. Over the two year period, the average energy savings in participating restaurants was 5.8 percent. These savings varied greatly depending on length of time in the program and ability to commit time, attention and money to making improvements.

In 2013, the City partnered with the White Bear Area Chamber of Commerce to help promote and host two seminars for businesses to divert waste from landfills while saving money on their trash bills. The seminars are led by Minnesota WasteWise, and businesses are given an opportunity to schedule a private visit by Minnesota WasteWise to analyze their waste streams and receive recommendations on how they can divert waste, properly dispose of problem materials, and save money. Minnesota WasteWise holds a contract with Ramsey County and will provide free waste consulting for any business within the county.


The City is currently partnering with CLASS 5 Energy on an energy reduction pilot program via a state-funded grant. Phase two of the pilot was for Class 5 to partner with businesses in the community of White Bear Lake to explore appropriate strategies for use in different types of business settings. The City sent a letter out to White Bear Area Chamber businesses inviting them to attend a meeting at City Hall to learn more about how they could reducing their energy use and costs through participating in the pilot.
To date, eight local businesses are participating in the pilot with Class 5.

The City has co-sponsored three waste reduction seminars that Minnesota WasteWise has given at City Hall in 2013. WasteWise has performed waste audits for several of the businesses that attended these seminars.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
2 star - Action 5:

Lower the environmental and health risk footprint of a brownfield remediation/redevelopment project beyond regulatory requirements; report brightfield projects.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The Johnson Boat Works redevelopment project in White Bear Lake uncovered extensive environmental contamination which the City cleaned up before construction moved forward. Contaminants included asbestos, treated timbers, industrial slag and other solvents found in the soil. The City followed MPCA guidelines and established a Response Action Plan (RAP) and then entered into a Voluntary Investigation Cleanup (VIC). After the Clean Up was completed, the City received a No Further Action Letter from the MPCA indicating that that the contamination was excavated and disposed of in an environmentally-friendly manner.

The site is planned to be a mixed-use project, including an 85-unit market-rate apartment building, a 120 seat full-service restaurant, 1,625 square feet of retail, a 232-stall shared public/private parking garage tucked under the apartment building, a 2,000 sq. ft. community room, a 15,000 square foot public plaza, and year-round public restrooms. The apartment building will consist of 61 one-bedroom units, and 24 two-bedroom units.

The City has completed many significant improvements on the shoreline of the site, which included new riprap to armor the shoreline and the installation of hundreds of native plants.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564

Renewable Energy {BP no.26}

1 star - Action 2:

Promote resident/business purchases and/or generation of clean energy by:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City of White Bear Lake promotes green power purchasing programs on the city website. We will also begin to promote these in our annual spring environmentally focused newsletter, and through our social media sites.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564
1 star - Action 5:

Install a public sector/municipally-owned renewable energy technology, such as solar electric (PV), wind, biomass, solar hot water/air, or micro-hydro.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City of White Bear Lake Public Works building has a 5KV photovoltaic system, built in an area that is easily viewed when inside the building.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Connie Taillon (City staff) | ctaillon@whitebearlake.org | 651-429-8564