City Detail

Background Information

City of Golden Valley
County: Hennepin
Population: 20866
GreenStep City category: A
Full-time equivalent city staff (approx.): 100
Participating township, county, school:

GreenStep Coordinator

Eric Eckman
City Staff
763-593-8084
City web page relating to sustainability/GreenStep activities:
GreenStep City resolution: Click here to view the file.
GreenStep City status and date: STEP 4 ( )

City Assessment Files and City Performance Metrics

City councils pass a resolution to join the GreenStep program and are recognized at Step 1. Step 2 and Step 3 recognition levels reflect completed city actions, reported and rated below with stars (1 star = good, 2 stars = better, 3 stars = best). The Assessment File below summarizes completed city actions in a short Word file. Step 4 recognition is awarded to cities who report a minimum number of core metrics for the previous calendar year. These metrics aim to show the aggregate, quantitative results of taking multiple GreenStep actions. Step 5 cities show improvement in the Step 4 metrics. See yearly data for Steps 4&5. Additional city data can be found by reviewing information on B3 Benchmarking and Regional Indicators Initiative.

Assessment File

Best Practice Actions Underway and Completed

Completed actions are denoted by stars.

Total completed actions: 73
1 star actions: 11
2 star actions: 29
3 star actions: 31

Buildings and Lighting Buildings and Lighting

Efficient Existing Public Buildings {BP no.1}

3 star - Action 1: Enter building information into the Minnesota B3 Benchmarking database and routinely enter monthly energy, water use data for all city-owned buildings.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
As of 2016, 10 years of energy use data has been entered for 20 City-owned buildings. Consecutive monthly energy use data for all 20 buildings is entered on a monthly basis by the public works administrative assistant. In 2006 the City conducted a facility analysis identifying features in public buildings that need to be updated or replaced, many of which would lead to increased energy efficiency if implemented. Trends and opportunities for energy savings are reviewed by staff and presented to the Environmental Commission on an annual basis.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Claire Huisman (City staff) | chuisman@goldenvalleymn.gov | 763-593-8030
2 star - Action 2: Make no/low cost indoor lighting and operational changes in city-owned/school buildings to reduce energy costs.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City is in the process of changing out T12 fluorescent light ballasts and bulbs for more efficient T8 ballasts and bulbs in all of its buildings. Motion activated lighting was added when the street level of City Hall was remodeled in the spring of 2016. Motion sensors have also been installed in approximately 10 locations for locker rooms and offices in City owned buildings.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Al Lundstrom (City staff) | alundstrom@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8046
2 star - Action 5: Document that the new construction or major remodeling of a public building has met the SB 2030 energy standard or has met or qualified under a green building or energy framework.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Brookview was designed to meet the LEED silver certification requirements. Major sustainable design elements on the Brookview project include:

• bicycle racks at north and east entrance
• three new storm water management basins
• solar reflective roofs and roof pavers to reduce heat island effect, and solar-panel-friendly roof design for future solar panel installations
• high-efficiency, low-water-use plumbing fixtures throughout
• high efficiency electrical and mechanical systems
• overall building designed to achieve approximately 15 percent reduction in energy use compared to non-green construction
• recycled/re-constituted veneer used for interior wood doors
• conference tables made from salvaged wood from trees damaged in storms
• reclaimed white oak paneling in lobby and restaurant
• low-VOC adhesives, paints, coatings, and flooring
• high-tech lighting control system with ad-justment for daylight and occupancy
• abundant natural daylight in public spaces and offices
• LED light fixtures throughout
• native and/or drought-resistant and resilient plants selected for landscaping
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Rick Birno (City staff) | rbirno@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-512-2342
1 star - Action 6: Improve the operations & maintenance of city-owned/school buildings and leased buildings by using a customized online energy efficiency tool, asset management tool, green building framework or green lease.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
During November and December of 2016, the City of Golden Valley worked with a Minnesota GreenCorps Member at the Great Plains Institute to implement the B3 2030 Energy Efficient Operations Manual (EEOM) for City Hall. The EEOM is a web tool developed by the Center for Sustainable Building Research out of the University of Minnesota. It allows local governments who use the B3 Benchmarking system to assess their buildings’ energy use schedules, determine where energy is being wasted, and reconfigure schedules to save energy. It also allows staff to schedule the performance of inexpensive diagnostic tasks that will ensure any significant energy-wasting malfunction will be detected soon after it occurs.
The GreenCorps Member worked with the Parks Maintenance Supervisor and the Water Resources Technician to evaluate City Hall’s current schedule. After finding times that the building was running unnecessarily, the schedule was adjusted to better fit the occupant needs of the building.
Outcome measures/metrics:
The pilot project occurred in winter 2016-2017. If this effort is extended over the entire year, the work will result in an approximate energy savings of 27,000 kWh (equal to approximately $6,000 in savings).
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Al Lundstrom (City staff) | alundstrom@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8046

Efficient Existing Private Buildings {BP no.2}

3 star - Action 1:

Create or participate in a marketing/outreach/incentive program to promote/achieve residential energy/water use reduction and energy efficiency.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Golden Valley contracted with the Center for Energy and the Environment (CEE) to bring free remodeling advisor visits and the Home Energy Program to residents in 2009. Information was made available in the City’s newsletter and given directly to residents who inquired about financing options for remodeling projects. Information on the value of evaluating home energy use and ways residents can save energy have been included in past issues of the City newsletter. The City has also co-sponsored the West Metro Home Remodeling Fair for the past 24 years. The fair includes demonstrations on several topics, such as; how to lower energy costs through various home improvement projects.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Emily Goellner (City staff) | egoellner@goldenvalleymn.gov | 763-593-3979
1 star - Action 4: Describe energy/water efficiency outcomes and other green building practices at businesses located within/nearby the city.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City installed three water bottle filling stations with filters at City Hall and Brookview Community Center. These stations help reduce waste associated with one time use plastic water bottles.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Over 6,000 water bottles have been saved since the installation of these water filters.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Drew Chirpich (City staff) | dchirpich@goldenvalleymn.gov | 763-593-8044

New Green Buildings {BP no.3}

2 star - Action 3: Adopt a sustainable building policy for private buildings; include the SB 2030 energy standard; adopt language governing new development projects that:
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
As of December 1, 2015, the City Council may only allow a new land use project through the planned unit development process if the proposal includes enough pre-rated public amenities to total at least 5 points. Some of the public amenity options include: a green roof (5 points), utilization of a renewable energy source (4 points), a LEED gold (3 points) or platinum (4 points) certification, a community garden (3 points), enhanced stormwater management (2 points) and an electric car charging station (1 point).
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jason Zimmerman (City staff) | jzimmerman@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8099

Efficient Outdoor Lighting and Signals {BP no.4}

3 star - Action 3: Replace the city's existing street lighting with Dark Sky-compliant LEDs, modifying any city franchise/utility agreement and adding smart grid attributes.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City has worked with Excel energy to change out all 558 standard cobrahead street lights with new energy efficient 3000k LEDs.
Outcome measures/metrics:
This action has saved up to 221,000 pounds of CO2 from entering the atmosphere per year, and saved the City 23% on its energy bill.
Descriptive File:
Excel Energy
For more information contact:
Drew Chirpich (City staff) | dchirpich@goldenvalleymn.gov | 763-593-8044
3 star - Action 4: Coordinate traffic signals and/or optimize signal timing so as minimize car idling at intersections yet maintain safe and publicly acceptable vehicle speeds.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
All 43 traffic signals in Golden Valley have sensors in the pavement to help the signals work more efficiently which minimizes idling. All of the traffic signals along Highway 55 from Wirth Parkway west to Medina are interconnected to minimize car idling and promote the efficient flow of traffic. Some signals in Golden Valley that are close to Highway 55, such as the Golden Valley Road and Boone Avenue North intersection, are also coordinated. All new County signals are being upgraded to include video detection as well.
There are flashing yellow arrow left turn signals at the intersection of Golden Valley Road and Winnetka Avenue N and at the intersection of Xenia Avenue and Golden Hills Drive. There is a yield on green light left turn signal on Winnetka Avenue and 10th Avenue.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Oliver (City staff) | joliver@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8034
2 star - Action 5: Use LED/solar-powered lighting for a flashing sign or in a street, parking lot or park project.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The entire City Hall campus exterior lighting system has been converted to LED (signs, parking lot lights, bollards, security lights). In 2017, LED lighting was installed at Ballfield #2 at Isaacson Park thanks to a Hennepin County Youth Sports grant. LED lights will be installed at the park's two other ballfields by the end of 2018. In addition, building maintenance staff retrofits LED lighting within park buildings and other public spaces as resources allow. LED building security lights are added as park shelter roofs are replaced. The City is working on creating an up to date inventory of these conversions.
Outcome measures/metrics:
The City Hall parking lot was retrofitted with LEDs in 2013 resulting in an 18,967 kWh decrease in annual power consumption between 2013 and 2014. In 2013 the cost of electric consumption from that parking lot was $3,172.86 per year; in 2014 it was $1,436.00 (reduction of $1,736.86).
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Al Lundstrom (City staff) | alundstrom@goldenvalleymn.org | (763)-593-8046
2 star - Action 8: Replace the city's existing traffic signals with LEDs.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
About 57% of traffic bulbs in Golden Valley are LEDs (982 bulbs out of 1,708 bulbs). 41% of the state owned bulbs are LEDs (281 bulbs out of 685 bulbs) and about 52% of the county owned bulbs are LEDs (347 out of 669 bulbs). 100% of traffic bulbs that the City owns (354 bulbs) have been replaced with LEDs.
Outcome measures/metrics:
In 2009, before traffic signals were replaced with LEDs, the City’s annual power consumption for traffic signals was 277,028 kWh. Since replacing traffic signal bulbs with LEDs in 2010, annual power consumption has dropped to 116,827 kWh in 2015 (a reduction of 160,201 kWh from 2009 levels).
Annual costs related to traffic signals have decreased as well. In 2009 operation of traffic signals cost the City $31,923.73. After replacing bulbs with LEDs in 2010-2011 traffic signals cost the City $17,542.50 (a reduction of $14,381.23 per year). In 2015 traffic signals cost the City $16,566.33.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Tim Kieffer (City staff) | tkieffer@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-3960

Land Use Land Use

Comprehensive, Climate and Energy Plans {BP no.6}

3 star - Action 1: Adopt a comprehensive plan or (for Category B & C cities) adopt a land use plan that was adopted by the county or a regional entity.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
In 2008 City Council adopted a comprehensive plan laying out the vision for the Golden Valley through 2030. The plan included a transportation chapter that addressed making improvements to bicycle and pedestrian facilities as well as improving trail connectivity.
The 2040 comprehensive plan, to be adopted in 2018, will include a chapter on sustainability and resilience and sustainability goals will be highlighted in all of the chapters. A specific bicycle and pedestrian section will be included in the transportation chapter including recommendations made by the Bicycle and Pedestrian Planning Task Force to expand multi-modal transportation.
The Comprehensive Plan references the City’s Capital Improvement Plan that catalogues public investments by date and cost, and the Planning Commission reviews the CIP every year for its consistency with the Comprehensive Plan.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jason Zimmerman (City staff) | jzimmerman@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8099
3 star - Action 2: Demonstrate that regulatory ordinances comply with the comprehensive plan including but not limited to having the zoning ordinance explicitly reference the comprehensive plan as the foundational document for decision making.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Chapter 11.90, Subdivision 7 (part B) of the City Code reads “The Comprehensive Plan for the City as adopted pursuant hereto, and any parts thereof or amendments thereto, shall serve as a guide to the City and its public officials as respects future development and zoning actions of and within the City.”
Reference to the Comprehensive Plan is often found in the “Purpose and Intent” subdivision of each section within the Zoning Chapter. It is also found in the Conditional Uses section. When planning applications (PUDs, CUPs, Rezonings and Land Use Re-guidings) are reviewed the “findings” section will acknowledge the application’s consistency with the Comprehensive Plan.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jason Zimmerman (City staff) | jzimmerman@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8099
3 star - Action 3: Include requirements in comprehensive and/or other plans for intergovernmental coordination addressing regional land use and watershed / wellhead impacts, infrastructure, transportation, economic development and city/regional services.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The Water Supply, Surface Water, and Transportation chapters of the City’s 2030 Comprehensive Plan all include policies that specifically outline continued cooperation and agreements with regional and state partners in order to accomplish the City’s goals. The 2040 Comprehensive Plan, when adopted in 2018, will have similar language in several chapters.
The City purchases water from Minneapolis through the Joint Water Commission (JWC) which includes Golden Valley, Crystal and New Hope. The JWC additionally owns 3 wells that can be used for back-up in an emergency. The City is also a member of the Bassett Creek Watershed Management Commission (BCWMC) along with eight other cities and has staff representatives on the BCWMC Technical Advisory Committee as well as the BCWMC Aquatic Plant Management/AIS Committee.
The City has service agreements in place with Saint Louis Park for inspections of properties located on the border of the two cities. Both Golden Valley and Saint Louis Park fire departments have mutual aid agreements in place as well. Lodging taxes from Golden Valley hotels go towards funding for Discover St. Louis Park, which promotes tourism in Saint Louis Park and Golden Valley. The City also partnered with the City of Minnetonka and the City of Plymouth to enter into its current recycling contract.
The City has agreements with several entities to ensure residents have access to parks and athletic facilities within City limits, including those owned by Minneapolis Parks and Recreation Board, Independent School Districts (ISD) #270 and #281, and the State of Minnesota. In 2015, the City entered into a joint powers agreement with Three Rivers Park District and the City of Robbinsdale for the establishment of Sochacki Park. The City additionally has an agreement with Saint Louis Park allowing residents of both cities use of Brookview Golf Course and Saint Louis Park’s outdoor aquatic park at a reduced rate.
The City also works with other municipalities and organizations to share public works equipment for milling and overlaying streets.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Since it began sharing equipment with other cities in 2014, the City has completed milling and overlaying on 3 miles of street.
In 2015, the JWC replaced a deteriorating 36-inch concrete water main delivering water from Minneapolis to Golden Valley, New Hope, and Crystal with 24 inch ductile iron pipe, which is more resistant to breaking.
In 2016, the City began jointly funding the reconstruction of Douglas Drive (County Road 102) along with Hennepin County.
IN 2017, the BCWMC completed a hydraulic and hydrologic modeling project to determine flood elevations across its member cities and evaluate the impacts of proposed projects on flood levels.
Descriptive File:
Joint Water Commission, Bassett Creek Watershed Management Commission, Hennepin County, Saint Louis Park, Plymouth, Minnetonka, Three Rivers Park District, Minneapolis Parks and Recreation Board, ISD #270, ISD #281
For more information contact:
Marc Nevinksi (City staff) | mnevinski@goldenvalleymn.gov | 763-593-8008
3 star - Action 4: Include ecological provisions in the comprehensive plan that explicitly aim to minimize open space fragmentation and/or establish a growth area with expansion criteria.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City updated its 2002 natural resource inventory in 2013 and used it to develop a Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP) which was adopted in 2015. The NRMP incorporated feedback from a survey that was distributed to residents which included questions about level of satisfaction with the quality of nature areas and open spaces and what changes could be made to improve and protect them.
The 2040 comprehensive plan, to be adopted in 2018, will incorporate the NRMP into the Parks and Open Space chapter which will identify natural resource protection areas and recommend strategies for integrating protection into the development process as well as utilizing the NRMP to evaluate land management decisions made by the City.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Eric Eckman (City staff) | eeckman@goldenvalleymn.gov | 763-593-8084

Resilient City Growth {BP no.7}

2 star - Action 1: Limit barriers to higher density housing by including in the city zoning ordinance and zoning map:
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The moderate (R-2), medium (R-3), and high (R-4) density residential zoning districts (see zoning map for reference) all allow for over 7 units per acre. R-2 allows up to 8 units per acre, R-3 allows for up to 10 units per acre (with a potential for 12 units per acre with density bonuses), and R-4 allows for over 12 units per acre. There are several places in the City where R-3 and R-4 zoning districts are adjacent to commercial zoning districts.

The Land Use Chapter in the 2040 Comprehensive Plan update will include consideration of increasing the allowed densities in both the R-3 and R-4 zoning districts.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jason Zimmerman (City staff) | jzimmerman@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8099
2 star - Action 2: Achieve higher density housing through at least two of the following strategies:
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Density bonuses are allowed in the Medium Density Residential Zoning District (R-3) for providing underground parking, locating near a transit route, or providing substantial recreation facilities onsite. Senior and physical disability housing in the R-3 Zoning District may be allowed a density in excess of 12 units per acre or up to 5 stories or 60 feet in height after review by the Planning Commission and approval by the Council. The Planned Unit Development (PUD) Ordinance allows for increased density.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jason Zimmerman (City staff) | jzimmerman@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8099

Mixed Uses {BP no.8}

2 star - Action 1:

Organize or participate in a community planning/design process for the city/a mixed use district.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
In 2008 a consultant was used to facilitate community planning meetings for the I-394 mixed use district for the comprehensive plan. Resident and business surveys were sent out and a visual preference survey was conducted. An open house was held to gather input on the re-zoning process as well as a “resident roundtable” to address specific concerns brought up in the surveys. A presentation on the progress of the project was given to the West Metro Chamber of Commerce and made available to other organizations and neighborhood associations.


The 2040 comprehensive plan will use some form of community planning process for additional mixed use planning. The City continues to expand outreach efforts in order to connect more residents to these processes.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jason Zimmerman (City staff) | jzimmerman@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8099
3 star - Action 2: Locate or lease a school, city building or other government facility that has at least two of these attributes:
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City Hall campus is connected via walking paths and sidewalks to the Hennepin County Library and McDonalds to the north, it is adjacent to small scale commercial uses to the west and south and senior housing to the east. There are bus routes that go along Winnetka Ave and Golden Valley Rd within 0.1 miles of campus
As of 2016 public schools located along public transit lines include:

Perpich Center for the Arts (reduced-fee bus passes are available for students who qualify for free or reduced lunch),

Noble Elementary,

Meadowbrook Elementary,

and School of Engineering and Arts (district magnet school).
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jason Zimmerman (City staff) | jzimmerman@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8099
2 star - Action 7: Create incentives for vertical mixed-use development in appropriate locations (downtown, commercial districts near colleges or universities, historic commercial districts).
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The 2008 comprehensive plan included a proposal for the I-394 mixed use district which encompassed requirements for a mix of uses in specific areas as well as development standards based on the design guidelines from the general report. Live/work vertical units are allowed in the I-394 mixed use district. Shared parking is allowed in some areas.
The 2040 comprehensive plan will give support to more mixed use planning and will expand the number of potential locations across the City.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jason Zimmerman (City staff) | jzimmerman@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8099

Design for Natural Resource Conservation {BP no.10}

3 star - Action 1: Conduct a Natural Resource Inventory or Assessment (NRI or NRA); incorporate protection of priority natural systems or resources such as groundwater through the subdivision or development process.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Golden Valley conducted a natural resource inventory in 2003 and updated the inventory in 2013. Using information from the inventory, the City created its first Natural Resource Management Plan in the spring of 2015 that identified high and low quality areas and strategies for conservation and restoration of natural areas.

The City has created ordinances to preserve high quality natural areas during development and the natural resource management plan is referenced when evaluating development projects. The Planned Unit Development Ordinance (section 11.55 of the City Code) preserves and protects substantial desirable portions of sites including trees, scenic views, creeks, wetlands and open waters. The City’s Subdivision Regulations (section 12.30) allows the City to require a portion of a proposed subdivision to be dedicated to the public as a park, playground, public open space or storm water holding area or ponds (up to 10%).

The Floodplain Management Zoning Overlay District (section 11.60) protects the critically important floodplains of Bassett Creek and its tributaries from any development that would threaten the quality of the City’s water bodies or ground water infiltration, cause rapid runoff or increase periodic flooding resulting in loss of life and property.

The Shoreland Management Ordinance (section 11.65) prohibits the clear cutting of natural vegetation, and requires sufficient vegetative cover be left intact or restored to prevent runoff and soil erosion within critical shoreland areas.

In 2015, upon the recommendation of the Environmental Commission, an option and incentive was included in the Tree and Landscape Code to plant a larger massing of native grasses and wildflowers in developments as an alternative to traditional landscaping, where appropriate.
The Green Corridors concept in the Natural Resource Management Plan will be used to inform the 2018 comprehensive plan process and the review of land use and development proposals.
Outcome measures/metrics:
A total of 57.3 acres of native buffer have been mapped inside Golden Valley (25.2 of those acres are owned by the City and 32.1 acres are privately owned).
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Eric Eckman (City staff) | eeckman@goldenvalleymn.gov | 763-593-8084
3 star - Action 5: Preserve environmentally sensitive, community-valued land by placing a conservation easement on city lands, and by encouraging/funding private landowners to place land in conservation easements.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
As of 2016 the City has established 12 conservation easements that cover 25 properties.
In addition to the 12 conservation easements, in 2007 the City granted a conservation easement for 3.07 acres of wetland bank in the General Mills Nature Preserve to the Minnesota Land Trust to ensure it would be preserved in perpetuity.
Outcome measures/metrics:
As of 2016 the City has established 13 conservation easements, totaling 25.7 acres.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Eric Eckman (City staff) | eeckman@goldenvalleymn.gov | 763-593-8084

Transportation Transportation

Living Streets {BP no.11}

2 star - Action 1: Adopt a complete streets policy, or a living streets policy, which addresses landscaping and stormwater.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
On March 15, 2011 City Council passed a resolution to support complete streets and direct staff to continue to use established plans and policies supporting transportation systems for all users.
The Transportation Chapter of the 2030 Comprehensive Plan addresses implementing bicycle and pedestrian facility improvements including conditions and connectivity as well as the integration of future pedestrian and bicycle facilities with roadway improvements.
In 2016, a bicycle and pedestrian task force was assembled to assess routes and connectivity in Golden Valley and a bicycle and pedestrian section will be incorporated to the 2040 comprehensive plan expressing the City’s intent to facilitate multi-modal transportation.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jason Zimmerman (City staff) | jzimmerman@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8099
3 star - Action 3: Modify a street in compliance with the city's complete streets policy.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The Douglas Drive corridor project will incorporate streetscaping, sidewalks, bike lanes and roundabouts at Sandburg Road and Golden Valley Road intersections for improved traffic flow. The project includes undergrounding overhead utilities and construction of duct banks and conduits for future expansions of several different utilities. Construction will be completed in 2017. A utility franchise fee was used to help finance the project. As part of the project, an existing stormwater pond was expanded and pumps were added so that stormwater could be used to irrigate nearby ballfields. Excess right-of-way acquired for the project is being retained as green space and two of the properties are being utilized as filtration basins.
The Glenwood Avenue repaving project will incorporate bike lanes. Construction will be completed in 2017.
In 2005, the City completed a street reconstruction project on Boone Avenue north of Highway 55, which included the construction of an underground duct bank for existing utilities and allows for future expansions.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
Hennepin County
For more information contact:
Jeff Oliver (City staff) | joliver@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8034
2 star - Action 4: Identify, prioritize and remedy complete streets gaps and lack of connectivity/safety within your road network by, for example, adding a bike route/lane, truck route, sidewalk or mid-block alley.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City has remedied certain street gaps in accordance with its complete streets policy. A Bicycle and Pedestrian Task Force was assembled to assess routes and connectivity in Golden Valley and a bicycle and pedestrian section will be incorporated to the 2040 Comprehensive Plan expressing the City’s intent to facilitate multi-modal transportation. The City’s 2017-2021 Capital Improvement Plan budgets for $400,000 in sidewalk and trail system upgrades (Project # S-030). These upgrades will be identified in the Transportation Chapter of the 2040 Comprehensive Plan in order to provide greater mobility for non-motorized transportation within the City that is fully accessible for users of all physical abilities.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Oliver (City staff) | joliver@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8034
3 star - Action 5: Identify and remedy street-trail gaps between city streets and off-road trails/bike trails to better facilitate walking and biking.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City created trails in Lions Park connecting the park to the parking lot and to Louisiana Avenue. The City also created a trail in Brookview Park running parallel to Winnetka Avenue, a major roadway. In 2002 the City facilitated MNDOT’s construction of a pedestrian bridge over Highway 100 connecting Bassett Creek Park in Crystal to Briarwood Nature Area in Golden Valley. A trail connection was also added between Regent Avenue and Briarwood Nature Area.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Oliver (City staff) | joliver@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8034
2 star - Action 6: Implement traffic calming policy/measures, including lane conversions (road diets), roundabouts, shared space and depaving, in at least one street redevelopment project.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The Douglas Drive corridor project will incorporate streetscaping, sidewalks, bike lanes and roundabouts at Sandburg Road and Golden Valley Road intersections for improved traffic flow. Construction will be completed in 2017. Reconstruction of Winnetka Avenue South and Xenia Avenue South incorporated perennial, shrub, and tree plantings in medians and boulevards. Xenia Avenue was constructed with curves to induce slower traffic speeds.
The City supported road diets implemented on three County Roads where four lanes were reduced to three. Almost every street reconstruction project the City has completed for the last 15 years has narrowed roadway widths.
When reconstructing streets, the City always looks for opportunities to remove redundant roadways and reduce impervious surfaces. In 2004, the City converted a segment of the Olson Memorial South Frontage Road to trail and greenspace. In 2010, the City converted a segment of road to a biofiltration basin (rain garden) and trail in Paisley Park. In 2017, the City converted a segment of Rhode Island Avenue to greenspace and flood storage. A redundant segment of road that was located in the floodplain at Scott Avenue North (near Minnaqua Pond) was converted to trail and native buffer.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
Hennepin County
For more information contact:
Jeff Oliver (City staff) | joliver@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8034

Mobility Options {BP no.12}

3 star - Action 1: Increase walking, biking and transit use by one or more of the following means:
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Golden Valley has bicycle and pedestrian maps available on its website as well as an interactive bike and pedestrian map where residents can input suggestions for trail changes to be used by the Bike and Pedestrian Planning Task force when working on the City’s 2040 Comprehensive Plan. Golden Valley has a park and ride lot at General Mills Boulevard and Interstate 394 and at Highway 100 and Duluth Street. Metro Transit routes and ridesharing information are available in paper form at City Hall.
Taprooms and cocktail rooms are allowed to substitute 2 bicycle spaces for every 1 required car parking space up to 15% of required parking spaces. Bicycle parking spaces are required for residents in developments with more than 12 units as well as for employees and the public in all other developments at a rate of 5% of the required vehicle parking (minimum of 4 spaces).
General Mills and Vocal Laboratories Inc., two Golden Valley based businesses, are bronze business recipients from the Bicycle Friendly ranking program. As of 2016, according to walkscore.com, Golden Valley has a Walk Score of 29 out of 100.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jason Zimmerman (City staff) | jzimmerman@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8099
3 star - Action 4: Promote carpooling or ridesharing among community members, city employees, businesses, high schools and institutions of higher education.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Golden Valley has two park and ride lots at General Mills Boulevard and Interstate 394 and at Highway 100 and Duluth Street. These lots give access to bus routes and car-pool services.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
Metro Transit
For more information contact:
Jason Zimmerman (City staff) | jzimmerman@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8099
3 star - Action 6:

Add/expand transit service, or promote car/bike sharing.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
In 2018 the City approved an agreement with Lime allowing the company to deploy a fleet of dockless bikes (in July) and scooters (in September). This agreement has been extended through 2019. Lime’s goal is to provide a sustainable solution to transportation in an affordable and convenient way, while also reducing the carbon footprint. The City has implemented the service and is actively promoting the program on the City website and in its bi-monthly newsletter.
Outcome measures/metrics:
At its peak, Golden Valley had a total of 53 Lime bikes and 61 scooters deployed. Through the months of August, September, and October 2018 a total of 769 bike rides were taken in Golden Valley by 470 individuals. And although Lime scooters were only in Golden Valley for a few short weeks, a total of 730 rides were taken by 439 riders.
Descriptive File:
Lime Bike
For more information contact:
Drew Chirpich (City staff) | dchirpich@goldenvalleymn.gov | 763-593-8044

Efficient City Fleets {BP no.13}

1 star - Action 2: Right-size/down-size the city fleet with the most fuel-efficient vehicles that are of an optimal size and capacity for their intended functions.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Public works staff routinely survey vehicles by department for usage, function, and miles per gallon.
Outcome measures/metrics:
The City has 22 vehicles that are E85 compatible.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Marshall Beugen (City staff) | mbeugen@goldenvalleymn.gov | 763-593-8085
2 star - Action 3:

Phase-in no-idling practices, operational and fuel changes, and equipment changes including electric vehicles, for city or local transit fleets.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Staff take a proactive approach and have regular preventative maintenance done at set intervals, depending on the classification of the vehicles. Staff periodically reviews vehicle fuel usage and costs and have found that regular oil changes and fuel additives help to optimize the fleet’s fuel efficiency and extend vehicle life.
In 2013, public works staff reviewed its snowplowing zones and routes for streets and sidewalks in order to optimize fuel and labor efficiencies. In addition, the City purchased GPS (global positioning system)/AVL (automatic vehicle location) technology and installed it in all snow removal equipment. These actions have resulted in improved efficiency in operations, and a reduction in fuel usage and the application of chemicals (salt).
Golden Valley City Council adopted a no-idling policy for City staff in 2008. The Golden Valley Police Department is exploring options for squad car computer systems that would allow for reduced idling.
Outcome measures/metrics:
The City has 22 vehicles that are E85 compatible.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Marshall Beugen (City staff) | mbeugen@goldenvalleymn.gov | 763-593-8085
3 star - Action 4: Phase in bike, e-bike, foot or horseback modes for police, inspectors and other city staff.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Bike patrol is used for enforcement in parks and on trails and in situations where it’s beneficial for officers to be more covert. Bike patrol is also used by the Golden Valley Police Department as an outreach tool. Every summer bike patrol and the Golden Valley Fire Department host weekly events in public parks to strengthen connections with families in the community. GVPD also offers an annual bike-along where residents can tour Golden Valley trails with two police officers and learn about bike safety.
Outcome measures/metrics:
In 2015 about 20 residents participated in the annual bike-along.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jason Sturgis (City staff) | jsturgis@goldenvalleymn.gov | 763-593-8059

Demand-Side Travel Planning {BP no.14}

2 star - Action 4:

Adopt a travel demand management plan for city employees or incorporate into development regulations TDM or transit-oriented development standards or LEED for Neighborhood Development certification.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City has a joint overlay zoning district along Interstate-394 that is shared with St. Louis Park. The Interstate-394 Traffic Zoning Ordinance (Section 113.124 of the City Code) requires that all dense developments, meaning those that contain more than 0.6 square feet of gross floor area per each square foot of land area within a lot or parcel, prepare traffic demand management plans if certain conditions occur which will help reduce traffic congestion, air and noise pollution, and other environmental problems associated with them. Plans prepared by the owners of these developments may require the use of rideshare incentive programs, public transit incentives, bicycle and pedestrian incentive measures, variable work hours or flex-time programs, measures to reduce reliance on single occupancy vehicles, shared parking, or other methods.
If City staff has concerns about the traffic impacts of large projects elsewhere in the City, they may require traffic management plans in those areas as well.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jason Zimmerman (City staff) | jzimmerman@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8099

Environmental Management Environmental Management

Sustainable Purchasing {BP no.15}

1 star - Action 1: Adopt a sustainable purchasing policy or administrative guidelines/practices directing that the city purchase at least:
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
In 2017, new sustainable purchasing guidelines were sent out to all City employees. These guidelines included specifications for the purchase of EnergyStar and WaterSense certified products, Green Seal, EcoLogo and/or US EPA Safer Choice cleaning products, and at least 30% recycled-content paper. In 2018, the City replaced floor mats in their General Service area with new mats that were made from 35% recycled material.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Marc Nevinksi (City staff) | mnevinski@goldenvalleymn.gov | 763-593-8008
1 star - Action 4: Require purchase of U.S. EPA WaterSense-certified products.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
In 2017, new sustainable purchasing guidelines were sent out to all City employees. These guidelines included specifications that all new fixtures and products that use water (including, but not limited to, sinks, toilets, urinals, showerheads, pre-rinse spray valves, and irrigation controllers) will be WaterSense certified when such products are available and financially feasible.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Marc Nevinksi (City staff) | mnevinski@goldenvalleymn.gov | 763-593-8008

Urban Forests and Soils {BP no.16}

3 star - Action 1: Certify as a Tree City USA.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Golden Valley has been a Tree City USA since 1987.
Outcome measures/metrics:
In 2015 the total community forestry expenditures came out to $273,266.80 (Golden Valley population, 20,371, approximately $13.41 per resident).
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Al Lundstrom (City staff) | alundstrom@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8046
3 star - Action 2: Adopt best practices for urban tree planting/quality; require them in private developments and/or use them in at least one development project.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The Golden Valley Forestry Department follows industry tree and shrub planting best management practices and uses MnDOT specifications for all street reconstructions and projects such as the Highway 55 Lilac Project. Golden Valley also uses aerial photos and digital inventorying to determine where more cover or more diverse cover is needed in the City. Planting projects are monitored for success and practices are re-evaluated as needed
Outcome measures/metrics:
Continued monitoring has generated the percent survival for the following projects:
A 2010-2012 planting project funded by a MN DNR Community Forest Bonding Grant (100 trees in 2011, 82 trees in 2012) showed an estimated 90% survival after two years.

A 2013 Met Council Environmental Services Reliever Project (47 trees) showed 89% survival.

A tree planting project in city parks in response to a 2011 tornado (funded by MCES grant and Trees for Tyrol group) (57 trees) had 86% survival.

A 2014 Tree Trust project in Brookview Park (35 trees) had 89% survival.

2014 and 2015 City Fall planting projects (14 and 50 trees respectively) each had 100% survival.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Al Lundstrom (City staff) | alundstrom@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8046
3 star - Action 3: Budget for and achieve resilient urban canopy/tree planting goals.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Golden Valley has an annual budget for tree planting in parks and public spaces ranging from $10,000 to $30,000 in addition to a budget for tree replacement as part of the Pavement Management Program. The City continues to monitor and inspect trees for disease and pests on public land and makes an effort to replace them with native, resilient species. Annually the City plants between 50-75 trees for both parks and as part of the Emerald Ash Borer replacement program. 5-10 trees are planted as part of other construction projects each year as well.

As of 2016, according to EarthDefine Geospatial Data and Services, which uses Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) data to determine percent tree canopy, Golden Valley has an overall city tree canopy of 40.5%.p

According to a DNR tree inventory conducted in 2010, Golden Valley has about 21.8 trees per acre in areas maintained by the City.
Outcome measures/metrics:
In 2015, 128 trees were planted in Golden Valley (74 public, 50 residential). 210 trees were removed from public property and 145 diseased trees were condemned on private property. $18,460 was spent on tree planting and initial care, $41,412 was spent on tree maintenance, and $16,500 was spent on removals. The total community forestry expenditures were $273,266.80 (Golden Valley population: 20,371).

In 2016, 60 (2”-2.5” balled and burlapped) shade and evergreen trees were planted throughout the parks and other public properties.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Al Lundstrom (City staff) | alundstrom@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8046
3 star - Action 6:

Build community capacity to protect existing trees by one or more of:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Golden Valley has two full time staff with Forestry and Horticulture degrees. One staff member is additionally a Certified Arborist and has a Tree Risk Assessment Qualification from the International Society of Arborists. Per Section 10.50, subdivision 2 of the City Code a tree inspector, certified by the Minnesota Commissioner of Agriculture, administers the Shade Tree Pest Control Program for Dutch Elm disease, oak wilt, and other pests for the City. The City is responsible for removing diseased trees from public property within 20 days of disease confirmation. Property owners are responsible for removing condemned trees from private property.

A list of recommended trees is provided for residents on the Golden Valley website. Recommendations for native and/or resilient species are made to residents who request tree replacement advice. Residents are also directed towards the MnDOT Plant Selector online tool to pick plants based on site characteristics and to the Plymouth Tree and Shrub sale where native, diverse species can be purchased online and picked up every spring.

The City began developing an Emerald Ash Borer Management Plan 2010 and updated it in 2012. The intent was to provide city staff and community with a dynamic pest management guide that could easily be updated as new pest management technology evolves. The plan calls for staff to work with residents who have boulevard ash trees and remove trees in poor condition by request. Forestry generally uses 10-20-30 rule of thumb (no more than 10% of any one species, 20% of any one genus, or 30% of any family in an urban tree population) for replacing varieties of shade trees.
Outcome measures/metrics:
In 2011 city staff removed 200 low quality ash trees. In 2014, 30 ash trees were removed from parks and boulevards and 67 shade trees were planted in city parks and rights-of-way. Each year low quality ash trees are removed as needed and replacements are made based on available funding.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Tim Teynor (City staff) | tteynor@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-3976

Stormwater Management {BP no.17}

3 star - Action 1: Adopt and use Minnesota's Minimal Impact Design Standards (MIDS).
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The vast majority of Golden Valley is located in the Bassett Creek Watershed Management Commission which adopted the MIDS community assistance package into its Watershed Management Plan in 2015. The Golden Valley City Council adopted Minnesota’s Minimal Impact Design Standards (MIDS) into its City code in 2015 as well. In accordance with the Watershed Management Plan, the City’s stormwater management ordinance requires improvements and development proposals to incorporate MIDS. Engineering staff have attended training on using the MIDS calculator.
Outcome measures/metrics:
All developments and public projects that trigger MIDS have been required to follow the new guidelines since the City code was updated. This has resulted in a reduction in the amount of stormwater volume, sediment and phosphorus entering natural receiving waters within the City.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Oliver (City staff) | joliver@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8034
3 star - Action 3: Adopt by ordinance one or more of the following stormwater infiltration/management strategies:
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Golden Valley code (chapter 107) requires stormwater runoff rates be limited to pre-project rates for the 2-year, 10-year and 100-year, 24-hour precipitation events. It additionally prohibits anyone from causing illegal discharge into the stormwater system unless they get authorization from a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) point source permit obtained from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency.
Public and private street width proposals between 24- and 26-feet are consistently approved by Golden Valley staff, and some as narrow as 18-feet have been approved.
Non-residential development and redevelopment projects between one-half acre and one acre where stormwater is being discharged to a surface water without being routed first through a stormwater management facility or best management practice (BMP) must include stormwater management BMPs to protect and improve water quality.
Developers are required to meet the erosion and sediment control requirements specified by current regulatory rules in the Stormwater Management ordinance, consistent with MPCA’s Construction Stormwater Permit.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Oliver (City staff) | joliver@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8034
3 star - Action 5: Adopt and implement guidelines or design standards/incentives for at least one of the following stormwater infiltration/reuse practices:
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Design guidelines for residents wishing to install a rain garden are available on the City website. The Stormwater Management Ordinance (Section 4.31 of City Code) requires permits for any development activities that will disturb or remove soils and/or vegetation. Projects must meet the standards set by the City and, depending on location, the standards of the Bassett Creek Watershed Management Commission (BCWMC) or the Minnehaha Creek Watershed District. Requirements are included for the construction of native buffers and stormwater management facilities. Stormwater control techniques including infiltration, evapotranspiration, reuse/harvesting, conservation design, urban forestry and green roofs are given preference as design options for those seeking a permit.
The lawn maintenance ordinance (Section 10.51) allows residents to fill out a native vegetation permit so they may plant large areas of native vegetation as an alternative to traditional landscaping. Guidelines for reduced salt use during icy months are on the City website and have been printed in winter editions of the newsletter in the past. The Planned Unit Development ordinance includes “Green Roofs” and “Enhanced Stormwater Management” as two out of 20 public amenities that may be included in applications in order to gain approval.
Rain gardens have been planted outside City Hall and buffers have been planted around ponds in Brookview golf course. In 2017, the City and the BCWMC enhanced the treatment of stormwater flowing through Honeywell Pond prior to its discharge into Bassett Creek and installed a stormwater harvesting system that will help irrigate the Sandburg Athletic Complex. Other advanced stormwater management techniques are implemented in smaller street projects as opportunities arise.
City staff uses Atlas 14 precipitation data in the design of public projects and the review of private developments.
Outcome measures/metrics:
As of 2016, there are 5 rain gardens owned by the City, 1 owned by Minneapolis Parks and Recreation Board (MPRB), 2 owned by Robbinsdale School District and 36 privately owned rain gardens in Golden Valley.
As of 2016, 4 sites in Golden Valley use pervious/permeable pavers (2 private, 2 MPRB). There is 1 green roof in Golden Valley owned by Breck School.
Descriptive File:
Bassett Creek Watershed Management Commission, Minnehaha Creek Watershed District
For more information contact:
Jeff Oliver (City staff) | joliver@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8034

Parks and Trails {BP no.18}

3 star - Action 3: Achieve minimum levels of city green space and maximize the percent within a ten-minute walk of community members.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
As of 2016, a little over 15% of Golden Valley (1,140.4 acres) is dedicated to parks and open space, approximately 54.7 acres per 1,000 residents (population 20,866).
100% of residents live within one-half mile of a park or open space.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Eric Eckman (City staff) | eeckman@goldenvalleymn.gov | 763-593-8084
2 star - Action 5:

Create park/city land management standards/practices that maximize at least one of the following:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Golden Valley has contracted with a professional consultant to assist in managing 25 native buffer areas using integrated pest management since 1999. The consultant performs monthly site visits and assesses whether an area needs to burned, mowed or treated. Herbicide is only applied as needed (through spot treatment).

Phosphorus-free fertilizer and herbicide are used on athletic fields, Brookview Park, and City Hall campus on an as-needed basis only. All staff that handle fertilizer and pesticide products are certified by the Minnesota Department of Agriculture on an annual basis and all products are applied according to their label recommendations. Herbicide treatment is used on athletic fields if weeds compose over 70% of an area. Milkweed is not removed from any public lands and is included in public planters, medians and along roadways. One staff member is level 1 certified in turf grass BMPs through the MPCA.

Golden Valley has four low-maintenance mowing areas on City parkland including Schied Park hill, Glenview Terrace Park hill, and Brookview Park Tennis hill. These areas are typically non-programmed spaces with steeper slopes. These areas allow the City to reduce inputs, save on labor, equipment and material cost, and diversify the ecology.

Golden Valley has significantly increased park and public event recycling to maximize recycling at higher use facilities (Brookview Park Shelters, the Brookview Park Tennis program, Isaacson Little League Field and the Schaper Softball Complex).
Outcome measures/metrics:
In 2015, phased mowing reductions were introduced to naturalize certain areas of parks that are not programmed for recreation including Schied Park hill, Glenview Terrace Park hill and Brookview Park Tennis hill.
There are currently about 53.5 total acres of native buffer established in Golden Valley (21.7 acres of which is managed by the City). In 2015, about 6 total acres of pollinator habitat were planted in public areas in addition to the 1.6 acres of buffer planted around ponds and along streams. 2.5 acres have been added in 2016. More pollinator habitat and stormwater management vegetation is planned for projects in the community in 2017 and beyond.

Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Al Lundstrom (City staff) | alundstrom@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8046
2 star - Action 8: Develop a program to involve community members in hands-on land restoration and stewardship projects.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Golden Valley has been running the Adopt-a-park program since 1992. The City has since added an Adopt-an-open space, Adopt-a-pond, and Adopt-a-storm drain programs. Participants remove litter and buckthorn from their designated public natural areas and Adopt-a-pond volunteers do some work, such as laying down erosion blankets, to correct soil erosion as well. Adopt-a-storm drain participants keep their storm drain free of litter and can also stencil a “dump no waste” message near storm drains that lead to a neighborhood pond, lake, or Bassett Creek.
Profiles of the adoption program and other volunteering events are reported on in the City newsletter and on the City’s web page.
Outcome measures/metrics:
In 2016, 31 (out of 36 available) parks and nature areas had been adopted by individuals or organizations in Golden Valley through the Adopt-a-park program. 1 resident and 2 organizations participated in the Adopt-a-pond program and maintained a total of 8 ponds. 1 open space was adopted in 2016. Between May of 2014 and August of 2015, 14 areas had been stenciled for storm drains.
1,185 storm drains were stenciled in 2014, 68 additional storm drains were stenciled in 2015.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Eric Eckman (City staff) | eeckman@goldenvalleymn.gov | 763-593-8084

Surface Water {BP no.19}

3 star - Action 4: Adopt a shoreland ordinance for all river and lake shoreland areas; reduce flooding and costs through The National Flood Insurance Program's Community Rating System.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City has a shoreland management ordinance (Section 11.65 of City Code) approved by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. All new shoreland development or alteration requires protection or restoration of shore impact area including a vegetative buffer. In the case of new development, the dedication of permanent conservation easements over a significant portion of the shoreland is required.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Eric Eckman (City staff) | eeckman@goldenvalleymn.gov | 763-593-8084
2 star - Action 5: Adopt goals to revegetate shoreland and create a local program or outreach effort to help property owners with revegetation.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The Bassett Creek Watershed Management Commission (BCWMC), of which Golden Valley is a member, established the goal to, “maintain or improve shoreland integrity and implement stream restoration measures to maintain or enhance ecological functions as well as human health, safety, and welfare” in its 2015 Watershed Management Plan. This plan also identified the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources shoreland habitat restoration grant program as a state funding source that cities and/or the BCWMC could obtain to fund shoreland projects (Section 5.2.2.4).
The BCWMC Channel Maintenance Fund can be utilized by private property owners in the member cities to cover part of the costs of restoring and revegetating shoreland areas along streams.
In the Surface Water chapter of its 2030 Comprehensive Plan, Golden Valley established the goals to “Protect and enhance fish and wildlife habitat and maintain shoreland integrity” and “Improve the quality of Bassett Creek and City lakes to enhance the aesthetics and recreation opportunities in Golden Valley.” The chapter also includes a water resources implementation program identifying projects that will improve water quality, potential funding sources, and proposed years of implementation. Several of these projects have been completed, are ongoing, or are planned.
Outcome measures/metrics:
The City has established over 5 miles of stream bank buffer (out of 16 miles of stream banks) since 2007. As of 2016, over 30 private properties stabilized their own shorelines, 5 with the assistance of the Channel Maintenance Fund. 20 private properties have restrictions regarding vegetation and shorelines established through conservation easements.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Eric Eckman (City staff) | eeckman@goldenvalleymn.gov | 763-593-8084
2 star - Action 6: Implement an existing TMDL implementation plan.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The Bassett Creek Watershed Management Commission (BCWMC), of which Golden Valley is a member, has a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) plan for Sweeney Lake. The Main Stem of Bassett Creek was included in the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA)’s Upper Mississippi River Bacteria TMDL and Protection Plan which was approved by the United States Environmental Protection Agency in 2014 and addresses the impairment due to fecal coliform. TMDL plans are carried out through the BCWMC’s and individual member cities’ Capital Improvement Programs and Surface Water Management Plans.
All members of the BCWMC meet on a monthly basis to make sure TMDL implementation plans are being carried out. Golden Valley residents provide funding for BCWMC projects, including TMDL plans, through taxes collected by Hennepin County.
Outcome measures/metrics:
In 2014, as a result of the coordinated efforts of the BCWMC, the City of Golden Valley, the City of Minneapolis, Minneapolis Parks and Recreation Board, and the MPCA to implement a TMDL plan, Wirth Lake was delisted from the Impaired Waters List.
Descriptive File:
Bassett Creek Watershed Management Commission, Minnesota Pollution Control Agency
For more information contact:
Jeff Oliver (City staff) | joliver@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8034

Efficient Water and Wastewater Systems {BP no.20}

2 star - Action 1:

Compare the energy use and financial performance of your facilities with other peer plants using standardized, free tools.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City is a member of the Joint Water Commission (JWC) along with the cities of Crystal and New Hope. The JWC purchases drinking water from the City of Minneapolis, which draws its water supply from the Mississippi River. The JWC owns two water storage reservoirs from which water is pumped to three above-ground water tanks and through pipelines that serve all three cities. One of the reservoirs is located in Golden Valley and one is located in Crystal. Golden Valley provides financial services for the JWC and therefore receives and pays all energy bills. Golden Valley uses the B3 benchmarking database to compare the energy usage of its water reservoir to peer plants.
Outcome measures/metrics:
The average daily flow for the three cities that make up the JWC is 4.75 MGD. Between June of 2016 and June of 2017, the average daily electric usage for the Golden Valley reservoir was 2,043 kWh per day. During that same time, the average daily electric usage for the Crystal reservoir was 2,834 kWh per day. Therefore, the JWC pumps and delivers drinking water at a rate of 1.0267 kWh per 1,000 gallons.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Joe Hansen (City staff) | jhansen@goldenvalleymn.gov | 763-593-8038
3 star - Action 3:

Establish an on-going budget and program for decreasing inflow and infiltration into sewer lines and losses in drinking water systems.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
All properties in Golden Valley must be inspected for Inflow/Infiltration (I/I) issues and are required to be in compliance with the City’s I/I program before they can be sold or transferred (Section 3.31 of the City Code). I/I issues include clear water connections to the sanitary sewer as well as cracks or leaky joints in the sanitary sewer pipes. Property owners who apply for plumbing permits (when valuation exceeds $10,000), variances, subdivisions, or other planning actions from the City are also subject to an inspection. Properties that do not pass inspection are required by the City to complete repairs within 180 days (Section 3.31 Subdivision 5.B).
The City also conducts voluntary I/I inspections as part of its Pavement Management Program the year prior to reconstructing a street.
The City’s 2017-2021 Capital Improvement Plan allocates $600,000 to address Inflow/Infiltration in the I-394 sewer shed (Project # W&SS-074) and $35,000 to purchase portable sewer flow meters for monitoring inflow and infiltration in the sanitary sewer system (Project # W&SS-076).
The City tracks its progress with the I/I program by monitoring sewer flow at nine sites and monitoring groundwater levels at seven sites.
Outcome measures/metrics:
In 2017, after ten years of implementing the I/I inspection program, 55% of properties within the City were inspected for compliance with the I/I ordinance. As a result of the City’s program, in 2017, 310 disconnects were made and 47% of properties in the City were known to be compliant with the Metropolitan Council Environmental Services (MCES) directives regarding I/I.
According to a 2016 meter review and analysis published by the Metropolitan Council, between 2004 and 2015, Golden Valley reduced its peak flow from 12.9 million gallons per day (MGD) to 9.8 MGD (3.1 MGD or 24%) and reduced its I/I flow from 10.9 MGD to 7.8 MGD (3.1 MGD or 28%). These reductions have resulted in savings at the wastewater treatment plant of up to approximately $2,772,175/year (cost to treat water approximately $2.45/1000 gallons x I/I flow reduction of 3.1 million gallons daily x 365 days/year).
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
RJ Kacach (City staff) | rkakach@goldenvalleymn.gov | 763-593-8043
2 star - Action 4:

Optimize energy and chemicals use at drinking water / wastewater facilities and decrease chloride in wastewater discharges.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
A third party electrical company inspects the City’s water and wastewater pumps on a yearly basis to ensure all pumps are working to their maximum efficiencies. The City has installed a peak shaving generator in its pump house and has replaced two out of the four water reservoir pumps with newer, more efficient models. There are plans to replace the remaining two pumps by 2020.
Outcome measures/metrics:
The average daily flow for the three cities that make up the Joint Water Commission (Golden Valley, New Hope, and Crystal) is 4.75 MGD. Between June of 2016 and June of 2017, the average daily electric usage for the Golden Valley reservoir was 2,043 kWh per day.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Joe Hansen (City staff) | jhansen@goldenvalleymn.gov | 763-593-8038

Sustainable Consumption and Waste {BP no.22}

Not rated - Action 2: Address concerns over consumer products and packaging through encouragement/implementation of one or more of:
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City recycles at our public buildings and facilities as well as at 5 parks throughout the City. In 2016 additional recycling bins were added to 3 parks to accommodate the amount of plastic bottles and aluminum cans that were being thrown away. The City has also taken steps to make recycling more convenient for visitors of the parks by adding more signage and larger recycling containers for easy dumping of material. Additional recycling carts are available for special events such as the farmers’ market, festivals, or other City events.
Woody organic material and yard waste produced by the City is trucked to the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community Recycling Facility that turns this waste into compost and compost blends for retail and wholesale purchase.
Outcome measures/metrics:
In 2016, Public Works staff collected 447.7 tons of leaves from City properties.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Tom Hoffman (City staff) | thoffman@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763) 593-8044
2 star - Action 4: Publicize, promote and use the varied businesses/services collecting and marketing used, repaired and rental consumer goods, especially electronics, in the city/county.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City annually hosts “Mighty Tidy Day” to provide residents with a monitored site to dispose of items that cannot be donated such as old mattresses and sofas, broken bicycles, unwanted tires and outdated electronics. Residents who bring furniture and household items in good condition can donate them to Bridging, a non-profit organization that provides quality goods to people transitioning out of homelessness and poverty. There are also several second-hand shops in the City, including Empty the Nest, Tech Dump, and the PRISM thrift store, where residents can bring gently used goods.
Recycling information and links to Hennepin County materials, including the A-Z disposal guide, are available on the City website and in the bimonthly newsletter.
Outcome measures/metrics:
In 2017, during the Mighty Tidy Day event, 584 residents dropped off 84 appliances, 15,008 pounds of electronics and 9,503 pounds of paper to be shredded. Republic Services filled five dumpsters of miscellaneous debris and garbage.

In 2016, residents disposed of the following items at the Mighty Tidy Day event:

6,976 pounds of paper (to shred),
520 light bulbs,
87 flat panel TVs/monitors,
94 small appliances,
37 large appliances,
73 pieces of scrap metal,
60 mattresses/couches,
61 box springs/chairs,
6 tires with rims,
21 tires without rims,
and 106.5 cubic yards of miscellaneous debris.

The total tonnage of scrap metal, mattresses, couches, box springs, chairs, and miscellaneous debris hauled away by Republic Services was 25.95 tons. Shred-N-Go, Tech Dump, and Better Futures provided recycling services for all paper, light-bulbs, and appliances respectively.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Tom Hoffman (City staff) | thoffman@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763) 593-8044
2 star - Action 6: Improve recycling services and expand to multi-unit housing and commercial businesses.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Golden Valley has provided a curbside recycling service since 1987 to all single and multiple family residences of four units or less. Garbage haulers must follow the City organized schedule. Owners of multifamily dwellings containing more than four units are required to provide a recycling collection service for a minimum of every other week collection, collection must include all materials collected in the City’s curbside recycling program (Section 6.35 Subdivision 11.C). Commercial and institutional entities are required to contract, through a licensed private hauler or the City, for recycling for a minimum of every other week collection (Section 6.35 Subdivision 11.B).
In 2017, the Environmental Commission plans to work with staff to update the City’s contract for recycling services, which expires in 2018.
Outcome measures/metrics:
In 2016, 2,174.05 tons of materials were diverted to recycling through the City’s program.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Tom Hoffman (City staff) | thoffman@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763) 593-8044

Local Air Quality {BP no.23}

3 star - Action 2:

Regulate outdoor wood burning, using ordinance language, performance standards and bans as appropriate, for at least one of the following:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Golden Valley has a City ordinance that regulates recreational fires (Section 12-24 of City Code) and provides guidance for recreational burning on the City website. Section 10-4 of the City Code prohibits the installation, use, and maintenance of outdoor wood boilers.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jason Zimmerman (City staff) | jzimmerman@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8099
2 star - Action 3: Conduct one or more policy or education/behavior change campaigns on the topics below and document:
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Golden Valley adopted a Smoke Free Environment ordinance (Section 14-21 of City Code) in 2005. The ordinance prohibits smoking in: both indoor and outdoor dining areas of liquor and food establishments, within 25 feet of any outdoor dining area at any liquor or food establishment, public places, places of work, within 25 feet of entrances, exits, open windows, and ventilation intakes of public places and places of work, and in public parks and recreation facilities.
In 2008, Golden Valley adopted a no-idling policy for the police department and other City departments with vehicles. In the first summer with the new policy, the police realized a savings of $1,600 per month due to decreased fuel use. In addition to cost savings, and benefits to the environment, the policy helps to extend the life of the vehicle fleet.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jason Zimmerman (City staff) | jzimmerman@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8099
1 star - Action 5: Install, assist with and promote one or more public fueling stations for plug-in hybrid and full electric vehicles, flex-fuel ethanol vehicles, CNG vehicles.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City has recently installed an Electric Vehicle charger on the north side of the City Hall parking lot, west of the water tower. It is a 240 Volt dual charging station, capable of charging two vehicles at once. The rates for charging will be 90 cents per hour for the first three hours, and $1.20 per hour afterwards.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Drew Chirpich (City staff) | dchirpich@goldenvalleymn.gov | 763-593-8044

Resilient Economic & Community Development Resilient Economic and Community Development

Benchmarks and Community Engagement {BP no.24}

2 star - Action 1: Use a city commission, or committee to lead, coordinate, and report to and engage community members on implementation of sustainability best practices.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The Environmental Commission coordinates and monitors the implementation of the GreenStep Cities program. All Environmental Commission meetings are open to the public. A summary of actions completed by the City and entered onto the GreenStep Cities website will be included in the Commission’s Annual Report to Council which will be made available to the public via the City’s website.
A link to the City’s GreenStep Cities web page is available on the City website.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Eric Eckman (City staff) | eeckman@goldenvalleymn.gov | 763-593-8084
1 star - Action 2: Organize goals/outcome measures from all city plans and report to community members data that show progress toward meeting these goals.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
All plans, such as the Comprehensive Plan, the Natural Resources Management Plan and the Bassett Creek Watershed Management Plan are made available for residents on the Golden Valley website. The City produces a biennial budget, updated and adopted annually.
Before commencing writing of the 2040 Comprehensive Plan update, staff reviewed how well the City succeeded at completing the objectives and policies listed in each chapter of the 2030 Comprehensive Plan. These reports were presented to the Planning Commission and made available to the public through the Commission’s agenda packets which were posted online.
The Comprehensive Plan references the City’s Capital Improvement Plan (CIP) that catalogues public investments by date and cost. Council must approve the CIP and the Planning Commission reviews the CIP every year for its consistency with the Comprehensive Plan.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jason Zimmerman (City staff) | jzimmerman@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8099
1 star - Action 3:

Measure and report progress on sustainability indicators including energy use/greenhouse gas emissions, social vitality/social inclusion outcome measures.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City has an Environmental Commission that consists of residents and advises the City Council in matters relating to and affecting the environment, including resilience and sustainability efforts. The Commission presents an annual report to Council regarding the implementation and progress of sustainability initiatives in the City, including advancement under the GreenStep Cities program.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Eric Eckman (City staff) | eeckman@goldenvalleymn.gov | 763-593-8084

Green Business Development {BP no.25}

2 star - Action 4:

Strengthen value-added businesses utilizing local "waste" material.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City annually hosts Mighty Tidy Day to provide residents with a monitored site to dispose of items that cannot be donated. To put on this event, the City contracts with several local, value-added businesses including Shred-N-Go, Tech Dump, and Better Futures.
The City regularly contracts with companies that use recycled materials in street re-construction projects. The City has permitted development projects that recycled asphalt, concrete, and other building materials for reuse on their site.
Woody organic material and yard waste collected by the Public Works Department is taken to the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community Recycling Facility that turns this waste into compost and compost blends for retail and wholesale purchase.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community
For more information contact:
Marc Nevinksi (City staff) | mnevinski@goldenvalleymn.gov | 763-593-8008
3 star - Action 5: Lower the environmental and health risk footprint of a brownfield remediation/redevelopment project; report brightfield projects.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The Liberty Crossing redevelopment site is located at the intersection of Winnetka Avenue and Medicine Lake Road. The redevelopment project is a partnership between the developer and the City to improve a blighted area, provide a mix of housing adjacent to transit, and create flood storage that benefits the community. The developer’s project involves the removal of four commercial/industrial properties, soil remediation, and constructing a mix of multi-family residential housing with a 187-unit apartment building and 55 townhome units. The City’s portion of the project involves pavement removal, soil cleanup, and excavation to create flood storage to help solve a community flooding issue.
This project includes two MPCA voluntary investigation and cleanup sites (one for the developer and one for the City) involving the remediation of soils containing petroleum, arsenic, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and debris-impacted soil. The City’s project has an approved response action plan which details the steps taken to manage fill that contains debris and contaminated soil consistent with all applicable federal, state, and local laws.
Outcome measures/metrics:
• Benefits of the City project include: creation of flood storage to benefit the community and environment; lowering of flood levels on Medicine Lake Road by about 1.5 feet and on nearby properties on ponds by about 0.3 feet; reduction of impervious surface area to help protect and improve water quality in DeCola Ponds and Bassett Creek; establishment of native vegetation buffer areas to improve water and air quality and enhance pollinator habitat; development of public open space and trails that connect to the Pennsylvania Woods Nature Area; improving aesthetics and increasing opportunities for recreation and wildlife viewing; replacing the aging Metropolitan Council Environmental Services sanitary sewer force main located within the corridor to ensure safe and efficient wastewater delivery.

• Benefits of the developer’s project include: onsite renewable energy generation with rooftop solar arrays, stormwater treatment and rate control, and a robust landscape plan. The solar arrays include: 136kw PV System for the Apartment Building; a 20kw PV System for the Community Clubhouse to run the pool pumps; and 27 individual PV systems to power each Townhome unit. The Developer estimates offsetting 5,325 metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions over 25 years.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Eric Eckman (City staff) | eeckman@goldenvalleymn.gov | 763-593-8084

Renewable Energy {BP no.26}

2 star - Action 1: Adopt wind energy and/or biomass ordinances that allow, enable, or encourage appropriate renewable energy installations.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City has a Solar Energy Systems Ordinance (11.75 in City Code) that allows solar energy systems in all zoning districts provided they meet the requirements outlined in subdivision 3 of the City code. The Wind Energy Conservation Systems Ordinance (11.74 in City Code) allows both mounted and freestanding wind energy conversion systems in the following districts provided they meet the requirements outlined in subdivisions 3-5 of the City code: Commercial, Light Industrial and Industrial, Business and Professional Offices, Institutional, Planned Unit Development and the I-394 Mixed use District. The purpose of these ordinances is to clearly define the standards for installing solar or wind energy systems, to ensure they are used in a safe and effective manner and make approval of such equipment accessible to residents.
Outcome measures/metrics:
A total of 9 single-family residences, 5 businesses, and 2 public buildings were issued building permits for solar panels since the City began keeping electronic permit records in 2001. The reported aggregate value of these installations is $363,793. There are zero wind energy conservation systems in Golden Valley.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jason Zimmerman (City staff) | jzimmerman@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8099
3 star - Action 2: Promote resident/business purchases and/or generation of clean energy by:
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City has a “Solar Energy” web page which includes information on Xcel Energy’s green power purchasing programs as well as a link to their web page for residential renewable options. The City’s web page also includes a link to the Minnesota Department of Commerce’s online solar app which can be used by residents to assess their property’s solar potential.
Outcome measures/metrics:
As of 2016, four businesses and 13 residential customers have installed onsite solar and are participating in Xcel’s “solar rewards” program with a total capacity of 193 kW, producing a total of 51,483 kWh of energy. In addition, one business that installed onsite solar is listed as participating in the “non-solar rewards” program with a capacity of 840 kW.
In 2015, two businesses and 396 residential customers participated in Xcel’s Windsource program, for a total of 1,204,172 kWh in subscribed energy.
In 2016, three businesses and 435 residential customers participated in Windsource, for a total of 1,744,623 KWh in subscribed energy.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Cheryl Weiler (City staff) | cweiler@goldenvalleymn.gov | 763-593-8004
1 star - Action 5: Install a public sector/municipally-owned renewable energy technology, such as solar electric (PV), wind, biomass, solar hot water/air, or micro-hydro.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
In 2015 Golden Valley added two photo voltaic arrays on public buildings that were funded through partnerships with the Made in Minnesota Solar program and power purchasing agreements with New Energy Equity (NEE). The Public Safety Building has a 40 kW capacity grid and the Park Maintenance Building has a 40 kW capacity grid both owned and operated by Sundial Solar. The City buys power from Sundial at a rate that is lower than what is offered by Xcel Energy ($0.085/kWh as opposed to $0.11/kWh). In the event that there is excess energy, it is pumped into the Xcel power grid and the City receives a credit on its monthly Xcel statement. The reduction in carbon emissions resulting from these arrays is helping the City meet its goals as outlined in the Mayor’s Climate Protection Agreement.
In 2016 the City committed to installing two additional solar projects: a 40 kW capacity grid on the Utility Maintenance Building and a 40 kW capacity grid on the Streets Maintenance Building. Both arrays will be maintained and operated by Sundial Solar. The systems are expected to fulfil 75% of the Utility Maintenance Building’s power and 100% of the Streets Maintenance Building’s power.
Outcome measures/metrics:
In 2016, the total energy production of the two solar arrays combined was 86,300 kWh, diverting approximately 60.6 metric tons of Carbon dioxide from being released into the atmosphere.

Energy from solar was able to account for 13.63% of the Public Safety building's energy use, and 100% of the Parks Maintenance building's energy use.

In 2016, both solar arrays saved the City a total of $3,499.95 (an average of about $291 per month).
Descriptive File:
Xcel Energy, Made in Minnesota Solar, Sundial Solar
For more information contact:
Tom Hoffman (City staff) | thoffman@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763) 593-8044

Local Food {BP no.27}

2 star - Action 2: Facilitate creation of home/community gardens, chicken & bee keeping, and incorporation of food growing areas/access in multifamily residential developments.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
In 2013, the City amended its Animal and Fowl-Keeping ordinance (Section 6-71 of the City Code) to allow for the keeping of chickens. Residents who wish to keep chickens must obtain a license annually and fulfill the provisions established by the City. Information on the regulations regarding chicken keeping is available on the City’s website.
As of December 1, 2015, the City Council may only allow a new land use project through the planned unit development process if the proposal includes enough pre-rated public amenities to total at least 5 points. One public amenity option developers may choose to include is a community garden (3 points).
Outcome measures/metrics:
Between 2013 and 2017, 12 licenses for keeping chickens were issued in the City. In 2017, there were 9 current licenses.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jason Zimmerman (City staff) | jzimmerman@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8099
3 star - Action 3: Create, assist with and promote local food production/distribution within the city:
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Market in the Valley is a farmers market that is held in the City Hall parking lot every Sunday morning June through October. Market in the Valley is operated by the Northwest Community Farmers Market Connection (NCFMC), all produce is Minnesota grown and sold by the farmers who grow it.
7,072 out of 9,610 residential units are within a mile of CSA drop-off points or the farmers market (74% of the population).
Outcome measures/metrics:
In 2017, Market in the Valley had an average attendance rate of approximately 1,000 shoppers per Sunday.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Market in the Valley Market in the Valley (Community volunteer) | marketinthevalley@gmail.com | 612-440-2648

Business Synergies and EcoDistricts {BP no.28}

Pending - Action 3: Require, build or facilitate at least four attributes in a business/industrial park project:
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
While Golden Valley does not define business or industrial parks, there are a few areas in the City that are loosely considered business parks by staff due to their attributes. The Sandburg Road/Medicine Lake Road area, the Downtown West area (between Highway 169 and Wisconsin Avenue North), and the area east of Douglas Drive between Golden Valley Road and Highway 55 are all largely composed of commercial, light industrial, and/or industrial zoning districts and are centers for office buildings and industrial uses. There is transit service through the Downtown West area as well as along Highway 55 and Interstate 394. All three areas are within 0.5 miles of single-family zoning.
One business resident, who renovated an existing building in the Downtown West area before moving into it in the summer of 2017, was granted a reduction in the minimum parking required by the City in exchange for evidence of adjacent properties that it can share parking with. The City also facilitated shared parking for the Central Park West property on the southwest corner of the Highway 100 and Interstate 394 interchange (an area which is zoned for business and professional offices).
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jason Zimmerman (City staff) | jzimmerman@goldenvalleymn.gov | (763)-593-8099

Climate Adaptation and Community Resilience {BP no.29}

2 star - Action 1: Prepare to maintain public health and safety during extreme weather and climate-change-related events, while also taking a preventive approach to reduce risk for community members.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City of Golden Valley is part of the North Suburban Emergency Management Planning Group. The group has established a regional Emergency Operations Plan which describes strategies and mechanisms through which cities will mobilize resources and conduct activities to guide and support emergency management efforts using the National Incident Management System. This includes a crisis communication plan that identifies spokespersons and how public information would be disseminated in the event of a disaster.

Hennepin County has an All-Hazard Mitigation Plan which addresses hazards including climate-related hazards such as extreme heat, storms, flooding. The County Emergency Management staff keeps maps that show critical facilities and hazardous facilities which are used to target areas during response, including where vulnerable populations may be present. Hennepin County has a website that utilizes a survey as a proactive process for community involvement and feedback on its hazard mitigation plan in order to assess vulnerabilities to climate change impacts and identify strategies and activities to increase resilience and lessen the impact of future hazards.

The City of Golden Valley works hard to serve all of its residents and businesses, and understands that there may be populations that are considered vulnerable or more susceptible to the impacts of weather and climate related events and service disruptions. These populations include elderly, children, persons with mobility or health issues, renters, immigrants, and economically disadvantaged. Approximately 25% of all persons living in Golden Valley are age 65 and older and are spread throughout the community. 10% of all persons living in Golden Valley have one or more disabilities and 29% of individuals 65 and older have one or more disabilities. 9% of all Golden Valley residents are foreign born and 3.5% of all residents speak English less than very well.

Outcome measures/metrics:
The City regularly updates databases and maps that identify critical facilities, hazardous materials, high density employment centers, high density housing areas, and vulnerable populations. Areas where vulnerable populations may be concentrated include properties with health care facilities, nursing home and assisted living facilities, senior housing, group homes, schools, child care centers, high-density housing areas, floodplains and other flood prone areas. High density housing areas include rental properties that may have a higher percentage of persons who are transient, immigrant, young, elderly, mobility-challenged, or economically disadvantaged.

The City is in the process of updating its communication strategies for emergencies and weather and climate related events. This work will include strategies for educating and communicating with residents before events (disaster preparedness, weather aware) and targeting specific populations before and during events. This work will also include exploring the use of assistive technologies for those who are deaf, hard of hearing, or speech-impaired. Among the vulnerable population areas listed in the section above, focused attention will be given to neighborhood watch groups, rental property managers, schools, and senior programs.

Following are communication methods the City currently uses to reach residents, including vulnerable populations, during an event:
• GV Emergency (automated call, text, email and landline notification system)
• City Website
• City Facebook site
• Press Release or Press Conference if necessary
• Email listserve
• Public Address system on emergency vehicles

In the event of a small local incident, Golden Valley has an agreement with Metro Transit that buses will be sent to shelter residents until the American Red Cross arrives or until people can be returned to their homes. In these short windows of time the City will do what it can to accommodate basic needs such as provide bottled water. During these events, if necessary, The Salvation Army could also be brought in for limited food. The City may ask for permission to use certain buildings as short-term shelters in the event of an emergency but there are no set shelters identified currently for this purpose. The American Red Cross maintains a national list of facilities that could be used as emergency shelters. If local governments need a long-term shelter the American Red Cross would be notified for assistance and the North Suburban Emergency Management Planning Group could support the shelter with cots, pillows, blankets and toiletry items. Plans for opening, staffing and operating a shelter is a coordinated effort between the American Red Cross, Local, and County government.

In the event of extreme heat, Hennepin County Emergency Management publicly lists cooling centers. Last summer three Golden Valley locations were listed but these may be subject to change based on continued evaluation and cooperation with partners.

In the event of a vector-borne illness outbreak, depending on the expected impacts to the community, various elements of the Emergency Operations Plan may be pressed into action. The Minnesota Department of Health would be the lead agency to identify, track and provide guidance on how communities should respond to such an incidence.
In addition to maps and databases kept by the City, Hennepin County Dispatch maintains a database of properties with alert information and special needs, based on prior experiences, for use in an emergency.

Descriptive File:
Federal Emergency Management Agency; Minnesota Division of Homeland Security Emergency Management; Hennepin County Emergency Preparedness; North Suburban Emergency Management Planning Group; Minnesota Water/Wastewater Agency Response Network (MnWARN); Min
For more information contact:
John Crelly (City staff) | jcrelly@goldenvalleymn.gov | 763-593-8065
1 star - Action 2: Integrate climate resilience into city or tribal planning, policy, operations, and budgeting processes.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City retained the services of a consultant to assist with the development of its first Resilience and Sustainability Plan. Writing of the plan began in fall of 2016 and was completed in fall of 2017. To first gain an understanding of the existing conditions, the consultant conducted a vulnerability assessment covering natural and built infrastructure assets as well as economic and social vulnerabilities. Focus groups, interviews with local business representatives, and a community survey were used to gather feedback from the community which directly influenced the development of the plan. The subject of one of the focus groups was supporting vulnerable populations in Golden Valley and was composed of people working to provide social services to vulnerable populations in Golden Valley. Results from the community outreach effort as well as the vulnerability assessment led to the development of six goals:

1) Promote and Develop Clean, Renewable Energy
2) Improve Energy Efficiency in Buildings, Lighting and Infrastructure
3) Promote Waste Reduction, Recycling and Composting
4) Protect and Enhance the Natural Environment
5) Plan for Resilient and Sustainable Infrastructure
6) Increase Community Resilience and Preparedness.

These goals, along with their associated objectives, policies, and implementation strategies will be incorporated into the City’s 2040 Comprehensive Plan update as a separate chapter on Resilience and Sustainability. The Comprehensive Plan update will be adopted by City Council in 2018.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Eric Eckman (City staff) | eeckman@goldenvalleymn.gov | 763-593-8084
1 star - Action 3:

Increase social connectedness through engagement, capacity building, public investment, and opportunities for economically vulnerable residents to improve their economic prosperity.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
In February of 2017, the City hosted two focus groups to gather feedback from the community for the development of its first Resilience and Sustainability Plan. The subject of one of these focus groups was supporting vulnerable populations in Golden Valley. The attendees of this focus group were all professionals who work to provide services to vulnerable populations in Golden Valley. Feedback provided by participants was incorporated into the objectives, policies, and strategies outlined in the City’s Resilience and Sustainability Plan, which was completed in July 2017. The City intends to continue this conversation and initiate actions to address the needs of vulnerable populations.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Eric Eckman (City staff) | eeckman@goldenvalleymn.gov | 763-593-8084
2 star - Action 5: Protect public buildings and natural/constructed infrastructure to reduce physical damage and sustain their function during extreme weather events.
Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The Physical Development Department implements an on-call system with an emergency “red book” which provides staff with critical maps (including sanitary sewer system, gray/green stormwater infrastructure and water supply mains), procedural information, and contacts during emergency events and disasters. Information in the book is updated on a continuous basis.

The City conducted a comprehensive facility analysis in 2006 to identify the investments that would be necessary to sustain the structure and function of public buildings in the future. This assessment is incorporated into the Capital Improvement Plan each year for building improvements. Public buildings are continually assessed for vulnerability to flooding and other structural deficiencies. Additional assessment of public buildings will be performed as part of the City’s Resilience and Sustainability planning effort.

The City is cooperating with the Bassett Creek Watershed Management Commission to develop a hydrologic and hydraulic model of the watershed. Once completed, this model will be used to identify areas of the City that are at risk of flood damage to assist in planning and preparedness efforts. In partnership with the watershed, the City is engaged in an ongoing effort to stabilize streambanks for erosion control, water quality protection and flood mitigation.
As of 2015 the City had 120 miles of street, most of which had been reconstructed under the Pavement Management Plan (PMP) including subgrade correction, installation of curb and gutter, and in some cases, repair and replacement of sanitary sewer and water mains. The PMP emphasizes preservation to maximize the useful life of the street (maintenance measures result in an anticipated pavement lifespan of 50 to 60 years). Golden Valley maintains 113 miles of sanitary sewer (consisting of gravity mains, lift stations, and force mains), 75% of which is over 50 years old. The City also maintains 136 miles of water mains serving the community, 69% of which is over 50 years old. The City has 83 miles of storm sewer pipe, 33 miles of drain tile, 3,083 catch basins, and manages 54 ponds and wetlands, 29 constructed sedimentation basins, and 4 bioretention basins/rain gardens.

The City has no municipal power lines
Outcome measures/metrics:
Several sections of streets within the City have been identified as being at risk of becoming inundated during the 1% annual chance flood event (100-year flood). One utility accessory building has been identified as being at risk of flooding during the 1% annual chance flood event. The City has a flood preparation checklist that lists creek crossings, bridges, culverts and streets for City staff to monitor during large precipitation events. The 2016 FEMA Flood Insurance Study indicates that all bridges/culverts in Golden Valley have the capacity to contain discharge during the 1% annual chance flood event and all but 3 have the capacity to contain discharge during the 0.2% annual chance flood event (500 year flood).

As of 2016 the City has restored and stabilized 5.2 miles along shoreline of streams and drainageways.

As of 2016, the City has made investments to repair several roofs on public buildings and park shelters and install a fire suppression system in one building. The City has also made investments to ensure new buildings are built to be durable and resilient to natural hazards. Fourteen (14) of the City’s buildings are considered critical facilities. Of these, only 3 do not have back-up generated power.
Descriptive File:
Bassett Creek Watershed Management Commission, Joint Water Commission (Crystal, Golden Valley, New Hope)
For more information contact:
Eric Eckman (City staff) | eeckman@goldenvalleymn.gov | 763-593-8084