City Detail

Background Information

City of Rochester
County: Olmsted
Population: 106769
GreenStep City category: A
Full-time equivalent city staff (approx.): 647
Participating township, county, school:

GreenStep Coordinator

Kevin Bright
City Staff
507-216-4457
City web page relating to sustainability/GreenStep activities:
GreenStep City resolution: Click here to view the file.
GreenStep City status and date: STEP 5 ( )

City Assessment Files and City Performance Metrics

City councils pass a resolution to join the GreenStep program and are recognized at Step 1. Step 2 and Step 3 recognition levels reflect completed city actions, reported and rated below with stars (1 star = good, 2 stars = better, 3 stars = best). The Assessment File below summarizes completed city actions in a short Word file. Step 4 recognition is awarded to cities who report a minimum number of core metrics for the previous calendar year. These metrics aim to show the aggregate, quantitative results of taking multiple GreenStep actions. Step 5 cities show improvement in the Step 4 metrics. See yearly data for Steps 4&5. Additional city data can be found by reviewing information on B3 Benchmarking and Regional Indicators Initiative.

Best Practice Actions Underway and Completed

Completed actions are denoted by stars.

Total completed actions: 90
1 star actions: 50
2 star actions: 23
3 star actions: 12

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
RPU offers two types of financing for commercial customers: Energy Efficiency Financing and Green Financing. Energy Efficiency Financing is available for improvement projects that show a reduction in energy usage. Green Financing is available for costs to obtain a customers building certification in EnergyStar®, LEED® or Green Globes. All financing is based on available funds. Monthly payments for the financed amount are based on the total project amount: balances under $5,000 are limited to 12 months and balances over $5,001 are not to exceed 24 months. Maximum amount financed per project is $25,000. No interest fee is required on the payment. Payments are collected as part of the customers monthly utility bill. Ad administration fee in the form of a check payable to RPU will be collected when the paperwork is submitted.

Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Tony Benson (City staff) | tbenson@rpu.org | 507-280-1534

Buildings and Lighting Buildings and Lighting

Efficient Existing Public Buildings {BP no.1}

1 star - Action 1:

Enter building information into the Minnesota B3 Benchmarking database and routinely enter monthly energy, water use data for all city-owned buildings.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochester now has roughly two years or more of data entered into the B3 system for all the City owned buildings utilities including steam, electrical, and gas. The planning Intern entered in all the data up to current. The City Finance department will then take on the role of entering in the monthly data for the future.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dale Martinson (City staff) | dmartinson@ROCHESTERMN.GOV | 507-328-2861
2 star - Action 2:

Make no/low cost indoor lighting and operational changes in city-owned/school buildings to reduce energy costs.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
From 2005-2009 Rochester worked with Johnson Controls, they went through and evaluated the efficiency of each government building in Rochester. This project had begun before the B3 Energy performance ranking, but Rochester updated and made the recreation center and the Civic Center more efficient with big remodels done to each building. These buildings were on the very bottom of efficient government buildings.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dale Martinson (City staff) | dmartinson@ROCHESTERMN.GOV | 507-328-2861
1 star - Action 5:

Document that the new construction or major remodeling of a public building has met the SB 2030 energy standard or has met or qualified under a green building or energy framework.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochester completed construction of the new Minnesota BioBusiness Building. The 8 story, 124,000 BioBusiness Center was completed in early spring 2009. The building is connected to downtown, Mayo, and UMR by a climate controlled pedestrian skyway system. Ample parking is available in a newly expanded municipal garage.

Specifically related to the Transit Operations Center including the storage garage the following technologies have been incorporated into the design. (Note- due to the cost the City is not pursuing LEEDS certification.)
1) Geothermal heating and cooling
2) Natural day lighting
3) Photocell daylight controlled indoor light fixtures
4) Quality indoor lighting
5) Photocell and timer controlled exterior light fixtures
6) Exterior light pollution control
7) Exterior sun shading devices
8) Internal sun shading devices
9) Low maintenance site landscaping
10) Automatic (sensor controlled) plumbing fixtures
11) Increased roof system warranty from 15 years to 25 years
12) Use of waste oil on-site to partially heat maintenance areas
13) Majority of exterior building cladding materials are produced within 500 miles of the site
14) Low life cycle costs for exterior building cladding materials
15) On-site bio and storm water retention basins to control and infiltrate most storm water
16) Pervious asphalt, concrete and unit site pavements
17) Facility is located on a bus route and on bike path
18) On-site bike rack parking equipment and showers
19) Energy recovery ventilators for fleet garage and maintenance areas
20) Automated system controls
21) Fundamental building energy systems commissioning
22) Site is entirely a smoke free zone
Contact Tony Knauer
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Steven Kvenold (City staff) | skvenold@rochestermn.gov | 507-328-2000
2 star - Action 7:

Install for one or more city-owned/school buildings one of the following efficiency measures:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Olmsted County's Waste to Energy facility uses solid waste to heat and cool, as well as provide electricity to most of the Government buildings on the campus as well as some other city owned buildings. This is a very efficient system for the campus and is estimated to have saved 90% of waste that would have gone to a landfill from the County.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Phil Wheeler (City staff) | wheeler.phil@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7101

Efficient Existing Private Buildings {BP no.2}

2 star - Action 1:

Create or participate in a marketing/outreach/incentive program to promote/achieve residential energy/water use reduction and energy efficiency.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochester Public Utilities (RPU) is required to meet a 1.5% reduction in energy sales each year. Residential customers account for approximately 15-20% of this requirement. RPUs annual outreach program to the residential customers includes the following:

" Bill inserts promoting, Conserve & Save®, RPUs conservation program and rebates.
" The Home Energy Report: The Home Energy Reports are a targeted direct mailing that is sent to residents of Rochester that provides specific recommendations and incentives that are proven to drive a reduction in energy consumption. The individualized Home Energy Reports show recipients:
" Energy use compared to carefully selected peers
" Individualized efficiency recommendations based on past usage data, demographics and housing characteristics of each household.
" Any other programs or city initiatives that that the city would like to promote
" Conserve & Save® Residential rebates include:
o Clothes Washers
o Refrigerators / Freezers
o Dishwashers
o Dehumidifiers
o Central and Room Air Conditioners
o CFL / LED fixtures and bulbs
o Geothermal
o Air Source Heat Pumps
o Furnace Fan Motors
o Customer Efficiency
o Solar Installations
" RPU works closely with trade allies (e.g. Sears) by providing training and information on their conservation programs that they then can use as selling points for higher efficient equipment.
" Participate and promote conservation at public events such as the Rochester Area Builders Home Show and RPUs Arbor Day celebration.

For more information on RPUs Conserve & Save® programs visit www.rpu.org .
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Tony Benson (City staff) | tbenson@rpu.org | 507-280-1534
3 star - Action 5:

Conserve/protect drinking/groundwater resources by creating a water-wise landscaping ordinance/guidance, WaterSense purchasing program, or guidance on rainwater harvesting and home water softener use.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
On February 23rd the RPU Board approved the following water conservation rates which became effective on April 1, 2010.
1. Residential conservation block rates (3 tier block rates)
" Base block: 0 to 7 units of water -- $0.692/unit
" Second block: 7.01 to 12 units of water -- $0.761/unit
" Third block: e 12.01 units of water -- $0.875/unit

2. Irrigation rate for commercial / industrial customers
" Single block rate: $0.875/unit for all commercial and industrial irrigation meters. This is the highest rate charged and the same as tier three for residential customers.

Note: One unit is 100 cubic feet (1 CCF) = 748 gallons

With the implementation of the water conservation rate, it was important that RPUfollow up with a public information and education program and incentives that would help their customers conserve. In conjunction with the implementation of the water conservation rate in April, RPU launched its Conserve & Save® Water Rebate program.
RPU offers rebates to customers who purchase energy and water efficient appliances and equipment that meet established standards of water and energy efficiency.
Residential water rebates include:

Water Efficient Appliances & Equip. Amount
High-Efficiency Toilet (HET)* $50
Clothes Washers** $25
Rain Barrels $10
Rotating Sprinkler Nozzle $4 per nozzle
*WaterSense
**ENERGY STAR

Educational and Promotional Activities
RPUs water educational programs consist of:
" Annual Water Quality Report (Consumer Confidence Report) -- bill insert
" Storm water management / Ground water protection collaborative effort with Rochester Public Works -- bill insert.
" Water Conservation Brochure which includes tips, water household audit checklist, a kids page and program information.
" Special events such as water tasting demonstrations at the Apache Mall
" School presentations and activities e.g. middle school presentations regarding water system operation, class tours of water towers, and high school science class presentations
" Water conservation tips and water rebate program brochures are available via the RPU Service Center, website, as a bill insert, and handed out at all RPU participated events.
" Water conservation kits are used as give-aways for special events.
" Water leak detection tablets are available for checking toilets via RPUs Service Center and at RPU events.

RPU has partnered with Cascade Meadow Wetlands and Science Center, a new environmental learning center scheduled to open in the fall of 2010. As a major partner and contributor, RPU will be phasing-in exhibits over the next three years to educate youth and adults with respect to: water source, water protection, and water conservation.

Other means of customer information include site specific water efficiency and conservation advice through 1) RPUs energy audit program and 2) water distribution workers visiting homes and businesses to investigate specific and implausible usage.
RPU and Minnesota Energy Resources (MER) have teamed up with the Center for Energy and Environment to offer Rochester homeowners Neighborhood Energy Challenge, which is part of the new full-service residential energy audit program. While the primary focus is gas and electric energy savings, our third party auditor also identifies ways in which to save on water usage and will install low flow showerheads.

On the commercial side, RPU offers a program called Partnering in Energy Solutions. RPU will partner with a business to help them implement energy and water saving solutions. The program encourages an evaluation and inspection of their equipment and processes to reduce maintenance costs, improve comfort, provide precise control, extend equipment life, and most importantly save resources.

Routinely, RPUs customer service department will get calls regarding high water use. RPUs water distribution workers will visit the home to investigate potential leaks. Customers are provided information and encouraged to follow water conservation practices such as:
" Investigate and repair leaky faucets / toilets.
" Install low-flow shower heads and faucet aerators
" Limit showers to five minutes.
" Use air-dry setting for dishwasher
Leak Detection
On a routine basis RPUs water distribution employees audit the water system for possible water main leaks. Leak detection is accomplished on one third of the water distribution system each year (approximately 2,500 audits). RPUs water accountability is currently at 94%.

Each month RPUs SAP customer care system monitors customers water usage by flagging unusually high meter readings. When high meter readings are detected, an assessment is made and if appropriate, RPU personnel are dispatched to verify the usage and identify appropriate actions reduce waste and conserve water.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Tony Benson (City staff) | tbenson@rpu.org | 507-280-1534
2 star - Action 6:

Provide a financial or other incentive to private parties who add energy/sustainability improvements, meet the SB 2030 energy standard, or renovate using a green building or energy framework.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
RPU designed their Partnering in Energy Solutions program to connect commercial customers with expert resources, Energy Solutions Partners (ESPs), to help ensure businesses are operating efficiently and/or building efficiently. RPUs ESPs will:
" Analyze current energy usage and future needs.
" Propose cost-cutting changes in energy usage, as well as energy efficient upgrades and equipment.
" Provide payback analyses of suggested improvements.
" Assist with the purchase and/or implementation of suggested improvements.
" List and apply for all available RPU Conserve & Save® rebates.

RPU promotes green building practices through its Conserve & Save® program, provides rebates, and also offers Green Financing to commercial customers. Green Financing is available for costs to obtain a customers building certification in EnergyStar®, LEED® or Green Globes.

For more information on RPUs Conserve & Save® programs visit www.rpu.org.

Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Tony Benson (City staff) | tbenson@rpu.org | 507-280-1534

New Green Buildings {BP no.3}

Pending - Action 1:

Require by city policy that new city-owned buildings be built using the SB 2030 energy standard and/or a green building framework.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Subd. 7. The City of Rochester is a signatory to the 2005 US Mayors Climate Protection Agreement (MCPA), which has been endorsed by the US Conference of Mayors, and signed by more than 900 US Mayors and 40 Minnesota cities as of February, 2009. Under the agreement, cities commit to the following: (1) urge the federal government and state governments to enact policies and programs to meet or beat the target of reducing greenhouse gas emission levels to 7 percent below 1990 levels by 2012; (2) promote land use and transportation policies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions; (3) increase the use of clean, renewable energy and make energy efficiency a priority; (4) adopt purchasing and building construction and operation practices that reduce greenhouse gas emissions; (5) increase recycling rates and urban forest cover; and (6) support education efforts about how to take actions to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
Public Works practices addressing 4) Support of Olmsted Countys Solid Waste Policy and location of Waste to Energy Facility within the City limits; (5) Implementation of Inflow and Infiltration Policies to reduce the capacity and operational impacts and costs on the public sewer collection and wastewater treatment system; (6) Construction of sustainable, durable, long lasting public buildings and infrastructure that increases life cycles, conserves energy, reduces long-term operating costs, and minimizes construction materials waste. (7) Incorporation of smart technologies in transportation infrastructure that increases public safety and reduces pollution due to congestion;
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
1 star - Action 2:

Work with the local school district to ensure that future new schools are built using the SB 2030 energy standard and/or a green building framework.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
While the most recently constructed school meets a green building standard, there is no firm policy in place applying to all new district buildings.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
1 star - Action 3:

Adopt a sustainable building policy for private buildings; include the SB 2030 energy standard; adopt language governing new development projects that:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochester has a City ASSISTED HOUSING SUPPORT CRITERIA CHECKLIST which helps provide residents and developers with a checklist of required items for those seeking assistance.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
3 star - Action 4:

Provide a financial or other incentive to private parties who build new buildings that utilize the SB 2030 energy standard and/or a green building framework.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Sections of the Land Development Manual applying to incentive development and restricted development, which address what in most communities are handled through planned unit developments, provide significant incentives for energy-related transportation, site layout, and construction features. Contact: Phil Wheeler
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132

Efficient Outdoor Lighting and Signals {BP no.4}

2 star - Action 2:

Purchase LEDs for all future street lighting and traffic signals.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The city of Rochester, Minnesota, is poised to initiate a significant LED streetlight installation project on city roadways. The proposed project is intended to replace up to 300 to 400 existing 175 watt mercury vapor streetlights with LED streetlight fixtures. The project is funded by an award of $180,000 from the US Department of Energys Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) program combined with a 20% funding match from the municipal utility, Rochester Public Utility (RPU). RPU has budgeted a total of approximately $225,000 in funds for the purchase and installation of the new LED streetlights.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
1 star - Action 3:

Replace the city's existing street lighting with Dark Sky-compliant LEDs, modifying any city franchise/utility agreement and adding smart grid attributes.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The city of Rochester, Minnesota, is poised to initiate a significant LED streetlight installation project on city roadways. The proposed project is intended to replace up to 300 to 400 existing 175 watt mercury vapor streetlights with LED streetlight fixtures. The project is funded by an award of $180,000 from the US Department of Energys Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) program combined with a 20% funding match from the municipal utility, Rochester Public Utility (RPU). RPU has budgeted a total of approximately $225,000 in funds for the purchase and installation of the new LED streetlights.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
1 star - Action 4:

Coordinate traffic signals and/or optimize signal timing so as minimize car idling at intersections yet maintain safe and publicly acceptable vehicle speeds.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Done on most or all high traffic streets. Contact: Rochester Traffic Engineer Gary Shannon
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
1 star - Action 5:

Use LED/solar-powered lighting for a flashing sign or in a street, parking lot or park project.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The city of Rochester, Minnesota, is poised to initiate a significant LED streetlight installation project on city roadways. The proposed project is intended to replace up to 300 to 400 existing 175 watt mercury vapor streetlights with LED streetlight fixtures. The project is funded by an award of $180,000 from the US Department of Energys Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG) program combined with a 20% funding match from the municipal utility, Rochester Public Utility (RPU). RPU has budgeted a total of approximately $225,000 in funds for the purchase and installation of the new LED streetlights.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Project has been Completed.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Tony Benson (City staff) | tbenson@rpu.org | 507-280-1534
Pending - Action 7:

Replace city-owned parking lot/ramp lighting with Dark-Sky compliant, energy efficient, automatic dimming lighting technologies.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:

Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
3 star - Action 8:

Replace the city's existing traffic signals with LEDs.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Traffic lights throughout Rochester were a mixture of old incandescent lights and newer, more
efficient LED lights. As part of a facility improvement project, a total of nearly 4,000 incandescent green,green arrow, yellow, yellow arrow and pedestrian walk/dont walk lamps were replaced with high-efficiency LED lights.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Once these were all replaced, every traffic light in Rochester is now an LED light, which saves the city a vast amount of money each year.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dale Martinson (City staff) | DMartinson@rochestermn.gov | (507)2858088

Building Redevelopment {BP no.5}

1 star - Action 1:

Adopt an historic preservation ordinance/regulations to encourage adaptive reuse.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The Rochester Urban Service Area Land Use Plan encourages and the Rochester Zoning Ordinance and Land Development Manual provides incentives for adaptive reuse of existing historic or cultural buildings.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
1 star - Action 2:

Implement the Minnesota Main Street model for commercial revitalization.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
As an outcome of its 2004 Market Based Downtown Plan, Rochester established a tax abatement district funding the Rochester Downtown Alliance. The RDA has sponsored district-wide entertainment events and marketing, a façade improvement program, and design guidelines for redevelopment projects. The Executive Director has been a participant in the Downtown Master Plan development and in its implementation. Since nearly all downtown development is incentive development, green building practices are attended to.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
Pending - Action 3:

Plan for reuse of large-format retail buildings, or work with a local school, church or commercial building to either add-on space or repurpose space into new uses.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
School buildings qualify for the adaptive reuse provisions noted above.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
1 star - Action 4:

Create/modify a green residential remodeling assistance/financing program to assist homeowners in adding space or features such as EV charging, renewables to their existing homes.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The Rochester City Council funds a home rehab program administered through the Planning Department. It applies standards which address energy efficient retrofits. The goals of the program are to preserve and restore existing homes and neighborhoods and to provide assistance for low income home owners. Preservation of historic architectural features and/or assisting higher income households to increase the size of dwellings have not been identified as priorities.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
2 star - Action 5:

Adopt development/design standards and programs that facilitate infill, redevelopment, and adaptable buildings.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Proposed development on the two key blocks on 1st Ave between 4th and 6th Street SW characterizes the type of urban design appropriate for this unique street within the Downtown. The architecture and development decisions coupled with major infrastructure improvements work in concert to create a distinct street profile for the area of 1st Avenue from Peace Plaza all the way south to the future UMR campus.
Outcome measures/metrics:
The streetscape is designed to provide abundant opportunities for seating and outdoor gathering in warmer weather, to minimize the presence of cars, and maximize pedestrian comfort. Bump-outs at the end and middle of each block provide additional space within the pedestrian zone between the building edge and curb. Abundant trees with space for tables and seating placed between them accommodate outdoor dining for the restaurants that will be focused along this street. Additional amenities are also designed within the pedestrian zone including
specialized paving and lighting fixtures that give identity to the district.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132

Land Use Land Use

Comprehensive, Climate and Energy Plans {BP no.6}

1 star - Action 1:

Adopt a comprehensive plan or (for Category B & C cities) adopt a future land use plan that was adopted by the county or a regional entity.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The Rochester Urban Service Area Land Use Plan, adopted initially in 1979, has been updated repeatedly since then. The most recent amendments include establishing a policy on affordable housing and diversity (in 2000); adopting a detailed master plan for the Second Street Corridor; adopting a detailed land use plan for the Kutzky Park Neighborhood, an urban core neighborhood; adopting a complete streets policy (march 2009); and adopting (in January, 2011) a detailed Downtown Master Plan.

With the adoption of the Olmsted County Land Use Plan in March 2011, the agreed-upon boundary of the Rochester Urban Service Area has been revised, identifying additional areas for which detailed future land use planning will be needed.
Outcome measures/metrics:
The Downtown Master Plan calls for a mode shift from current 70% single occupant vehicles for commuters to downtown to 50% by 2030. ACS data and local employer data will be used to track mode shift.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
1 star - Action 2:

Demonstrate that regulatory ordinances comply with the comprehensive plan including but not limited to having the zoning ordinance explicitly reference the comprehensive plan as the foundational document for decision making.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The Rochester Zoning Ordinance and Land Development Manual makes dozens of references the City's Long Range Transportation Plan, Land Use Plan, Housing Plan, Complete Streets Policy, and Policy on Affordable Housing and Diversity, requiring adherence to related policies and maps.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
1 star - Action 3:

Include requirements in comprehensive and/or other plans for intergovernmental coordination addressing regional land use and watershed / wellhead impacts, infrastructure, transportation, economic development and city/regional services.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
a. Transportation: The Comprehensive Plan includes the ROCOG Long Range Transportation Plan, adopted jointly by the City of Rochester, Olmsted County, and the Rochester Olmsted Council of Governments. The ROCOG Plan addresses transit and non-motorized transportation and encourages land use patterns that facilitate mode shifts away from single occupant vehicles. Contact: Phil Wheeler
http://www.co.olmsted.mn.us/planning/rocog/lrtp/Pages/default.aspx
b. Watershed impacts: Intergovernmental coordination on watershed matters is accomplished through the South Zumbro Joint Powers Board, coordinated policy on wetlands and groundwater-related matters (e.g., through adoption of closely parallel regulations protecting the filtering function of Decorah Edge wetland and related groundwater discharge/recharge areas), and joint City/County work on stormwater management and water planning.
c. Land use: The City and County coordinate in the delineation of boundaries for urban service areas and in the development of implementation techniques to protect future urban service areas for urban density development, as well as in the development and implementation of policies to protect agricultural land and direct urban development to areas with municipal services.d. Economic development: Economic development is addressed in the Comprehensive Plan. The City and County are key participants in and funders of Rochester Area Economic Development, Incorporated, a regional economic development organization. The city and County also coordinate infrastructure investment to ensure the availability of sites for future economic activities.
e. Housing and foreclosures: The City and County are served by the Olmsted County Housing and Redevelopment Authority, to which both entities make appointments. The City of Rochester has adopted the Policy on Affordable Housing and Diversity as an element of its comprehensive plan. The City devotes 40% to 50% of its CDBG funding each year to the rehabilitation of low income owner-occupied housing.
f. Police: City and County law enforcement agencies share office space, dispatch services, and IT and GIS resources.
g. Fire: Fire prevention services are coordinated with Rochester Building Safety, Public Works, and Planning development review. Fire response is integrated with ambulance, police, and dispatch services and with GIS and IT resources.
h. Health: The Rochester Urban Service Area Land Use Plan was recently amended to make explicit reference to the health benefits of active living and provision for mixed use development relying on transit and non-motorized modes.
i. Sewer and water: See land use, above.

Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
1 star - Action 4:

Include ecological provisions in the comprehensive plan that explicitly aim to minimize open space fragmentation and/or establish a growth area with expansion criteria.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
a. Minimize the fragmentation and development of agricultural, forest, wildlife, and high quality open space lands in and around the city. The Comprehensive Plan includes growth guidelines that explicitly address preservation of resource uses including agriculture, forestry, and wildlife habitat.
b. For cities adjacent to undeveloped land, establish a growth area with staging criteria that reflects projected population growth and, if applicable, is subject to an orderly annexation agreement and planned extension of municipal services. The Comprehensive Plan has (since 1978) identified and protected an urban growth area, the size of which has been tied to projected urban population and employment growth.
c. Establish policies with numerical targets to reduce vehicle miles traveled. The Comprehensive Plan addresses reducing per capita vehicle miles of travel through shifts to non-SOV modes, continued emphasis on compact development, and mixed use development. With the population and employment growth experienced by Rochester over the past decades (growing the equivalent of three cities the size of Red Wing since 1980), an absolute decline in total VMT may be unrealistic. The numerical target for per capita VMT reduction is under development.


Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
1 star - Action 5:

Adopt climate mitigation and/or energy independence goals and objectives in the comprehensive plan or in a separate policy document, and include transportation recommendations such as becoming an EV-ready city.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochester has adopted ambitious energy conservation and greenhouse gas reduction goals. The first step, a baseline inventory of energy consumption, is in progress. While that is going on, Rochester has embarked on a Neighborhood Energy Challenge program (see http://www.rpu.org/your_home/power_services/neighborhood_energy_challenge/Default.htm)
Outcome measures/metrics:
Metrics will be developed as part of the baseline inventory project.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Tony Benson (City staff) | tbenson@rpu.org | 507-280-1534

Resilient City Growth {BP no.7}

1 star - Action 1:

Limit barriers to higher density housing by including in the city zoning ordinance and zoning map:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochester's default district on annexation is the R1-x District, which has a minimum single family lot size of 6000 square feet and which allows duplexes and townhouse development as permitted uses.
Outcome measures/metrics:
average density of new housing
average lot size of new housing
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
2 star - Action 2:

Achieve higher density housing through at least two of the following strategies:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochester's zoning ordinance incorporates three of the four suggested strategies. It has flexible frontage and lot size standards, makes density bonuses available in four of six residential districts, and allows accessory apartments in the same four districts 9one of which, R1-x, is the default district on annexation).
Outcome measures/metrics:
average density of new development
average lot size for new development
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
2 star - Action 3:

Achieve higher intensity commercial/industrial land uses through at least one of the following strategies:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochesters CDC has a zero-lot-line setback as well as a FAR Maximum of 6.0
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132

Mixed Uses {BP no.8}

1 star - Action 2:

Locate or lease a school, city building or other government facility that has at least two of these attributes:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Located Downtown,a building containing a police station,fire department, and the Olmsted county license bureau, the building is easily accesible by the public transit system at multiple locations. The building also promotes walking around downtown. There are multiple connecting bridges that allow pedestrians to cross the river to the rest of downtown. The building is also adjacent to numerous other employment buildings.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Steven Kvenold (City staff) | skvenold@rochestermn.gov | 507-328-2000
1 star - Action 3:

Modify a planned unit development ordinance to emphasize mixed use development, to limit residential PUDs to areas adjacent to commercial development, and/or to add sustainability features.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochesters zoning ordinance provides incentives for mixed use development and for walkability and transit access.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
3 star - Action 5:

Have a downtown zoning district that allows residential and compatible commercial development.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
In 2009 Rochester created an Urban Village Overlay Zone district. The area is intended to have buildings around 4-5 stories tall. The idea of the village is to have a mixed use of office, retail, and residential units all located within the same building. The Village would promote walk ability and a convenience for shopping. It is located downtown so it would get a lot of use from mayo clinic and other downtown employees.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
2 star - Action 7:

Create incentives for vertical mixed-use development in appropriate locations (downtown, commercial districts near colleges or universities, historic commercial districts).

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochesters zoning ordinance provides incentives for mixed use development and for walkability and transit access. See 8.5 as well.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132

Efficient Highway- and Auto-Oriented Development {BP no.9}

1 star - Action 1:

Establish design goals for at least one highway/auto-oriented corridor/cluster.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochester recently did work on County Road 104.the Rochester-Olmsted Council of Governments (ROCOG) has identified in its Long Range Transportation Plan (LRTP) a network of future arterial corridors which will be needed to ensure the safety and mobility of the traveling public. County Road (CR) 104/60th Avenue has been identified in the LRTP as a key future corridor. It has been identified as part of the outer beltway system around the City of Rochester's urbanized area that is expected to be developed over the next 25 to 30 years. There were 5 design policies created to define the grade and layout of intersecting streets and lots adjacent to the corridor. Policy #1 Design speed- desired speed will be 55 MPH. #2 Design standards- County state aid standards will be followed for lane widths, curvatures, grades and shoulder widths. #3. Median type- Throughout the corridor the predominant median design would be a depressed median with median crossovers limited to one every 1/4 mile. On approached to major intersections a compressed intersection design with raised medians will be considered to facilitate turn lanes and pedestrian crossing and create refuge areas for pedestrians. #4Typical cross section design-The basic design for the corridor will incorporate open ditches on the outside of the travel lanes and a grassed, depressed median to separate the travel lanes. Exceptions to this would be considered at future signalized intersections where pedestrian and bicycle crossing is encouraged. #5 Site grading- Owners or developers who, through a proposed development, site expansion or change of use are initiating grading activity on a property, will be required to grade the site to match the proposed center line profile and cross section for 60th ave. based on the ultimate cross section for the corridor.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
2 star - Action 2:

Participate in regional economic development planning with representatives from surrounding townships, cities, the county and business interests to:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Done as part of the County Land Use Plan update. Meetings occur with the Olmsted County Board
Outcome measures/metrics:
Land use, environmental, natural resource, and related issues cross political
jurisdiction boundaries. In recognition of this fact, the 2009 Plan Update has been
developed cooperatively. The ongoing planning process should continue to
encourage cooperation. Examples of such cooperation include the Township
Cooperative Planning Association (TCPA), the Rochester Olmsted Council of
Governments, cooperative agreements between townships and Olmsted
County coordinating zoning enforcement, and the Rochester Olmsted Planning
Department.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
1 star - Action 3:

Adopt infrastructure design standards that protect the economic and ecologic functions of the highway corridor through clustering of development, plantings and incorporating access management standards.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
a. Improve the ecologic functions of land adjacent to highway corridors.
Subdivision 1. Purpose and Intent. The City of Rochester finds that trees and especially shade trees along streets provide numerous community benefits including:
1. Economic stability through enhanced property values, improved property marketability, and as a component of city infrastructure;
2. Energy savings by reducing the urban heat island impacts, and reduced building heating and cooling costs;
3. Health benefits through an increased sense of community, mental comfort, traffic safety, traffic calming, and support of a walkable community;
4. Aesthetic values for residential and commercial areas;
5. The amelioration of noise and glare;
6. Air pollution reduction through removal of atmospheric chemicals including greenhouse gases and particulate matter; and
7. Protection of water quality and enhancing stormwater control.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Nate Stanley (City staff) | Nstanley@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6356
1 star - Action 4:

Allow auto-oriented commercial districts at the sub-urban edge and/or in tightly defined and smaller urban development corridors/nodes that have some bike/walk/transit access.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochester and Olmsted County have implemented access management ordinances.
c. Adequate Public Facilities ordinance that stages highway commercial development concurrently with infrastructure expansion. Rochester has implemented adopted an adequate public facilities standard as part of its Zoning Ordinance and Land Development Manual. http://www.ci.rochester.mn.us/departments/planning_zoning/chapter64/64130ADEQUATEPUBLICFACILITIESSTANDARDS.asp
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132

Design for Natural Resource Conservation {BP no.10}

3 star - Action 2:

For cities outside or on the fringe of metropolitan areas, conduct a build-out analysis, fiscal impact study, or adopt an urban growth boundary and a consistent capital improvement plan that provides long-term protection of natural resources and natural systems, and agricultural practices outside the boundary.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochester, and Olmsted county were early adopters of urban growth boundaries, and protecting natural resources. The county adopted their first land use plan in 1979. This laid a strong foundation of protection for Rochester and the surrounding cities and communities of Olmsted County.
"The 1978 Plan had four major themes guiding the development of the Plan map and
the various implementation strategies, including
• concentrating development,
• protecting agriculture,
• protecting the natural environment, and
• providing for a wide range of choice in residential location"

The Plan was revised in 1995 and set more goals
"Wisely use the energy resources, urban systems, and land area of Olmsted County
by concentrating urban and suburban development and by creating an orderly
pattern of development (sustainable and efficient). 2. Encourage practices and technologies that maximize efficiency of resource use and
minimize waste (sustainable, habitable, and efficient). 3. Preserve the natural and cultural resources that provide a “sense of place” for the
county (beautiful and sustainable). 4. Ensure that growth pays for itself; incorporate long-term costs and benefits into the
community decision-making process (sustainable, competitive, equitable, and
efficient). 5. Conserve and restore natural resources, including agricultural resources, and
protect the ecological systems of the natural environment and economic uses of
those resources (sustainable, habitable, and competitive). 6. Encourage the development of affordable housing and provide for a reasonable
range of choice in housing and lifestyles (habitable and equitable). 7. Encourage the creation of economic opportunities in an equitable fashion for all
citizens (competitive and equitable).8. Seek methods for implementing community policy that are cost-effective, that link
costs to benefitting properties, and that accomplish public goals while
accommodating private interests (competitive, efficient, and accessible).9. Cooperate with local jurisdictions within and adjacent to Olmsted County in the
development and implementation of the Plan (accessible).10. Respond to land use and resource management issues in a flexible and proactive
way (accessible and efficient). 11. Sustainable communities (sustainable and efficient)"

The plan has very effectively and consciously marked areas for urban service, suburban development, and resource protection areas.




Outcome measures/metrics:
The cities comprehensive plan is looking at getting a revamp soon to better reflect the similar ideas laid out in the County Plan.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
2 star - Action 5:

Preserve environmentally sensitive, community-valued land by placing a conservation easement on city lands, and by encouraging/funding private landowners to place land in conservation easements.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Olmsted County has implemented a soil and water conservation district for quite a few years. The Mission of the Olmsted Soil and Water Conservation District is to promote
more sustainable resource utilization and protection of natural resources in the
County. The District assists farmers, communities, watershed planners and
landowners in developing and implementing conservation and resource
management systems and practices. The District also serves as a source for
conservation and resource information and provides environmental education for
county residents.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Andy Hart (City staff) | Hart@starband.net | (507) 280-2850

Transportation Transportation

Living Streets {BP no.11}

1 star - Action 1:

Adopt a complete streets policy, or a living streets policy, which addresses landscaping and stormwater.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochester has implemented a Complete street policy. The complete streets policy is adopted to encrouage the development of roadway improvement projects that are planned, designed, constructed and maintained to integrate walking, bicycling and transit use while promoting safe and efficient operations for all users. Streets that support and invite multiple uses- including safe, active, and adequate space for pedestrians, bicycles, and public transit- are more conducive to the public life of an urban community and efficient movement of people and goods than streets designed primarily to move automobiles. The preservation and addition of boulevard trees (street trees) is a major priority with this policy as well. Rochester has a very defined policy on boulevard trees.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Construction has been completed on numerous arterial streets already in Rochester. The Rochester-Olmsted Council of Governments 2040 Long Range Transportation plan has outlined and Identified numerous other streets that will become complete streets.
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
2 star - Action 3:

Modify a street in compliance with the city's complete streets policy.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochester has been an early adopter of complete streets and has numerous examples of this best practice. One very notable project that is wrapping up is on second street southwest. The project will be finished in November. The project contains a road diet of 4 lanes down to three, bike lanes on both sides, a median with stormwater capture design, both directions have bumpouts for parking, and bumpouts for cross walks at the major intersections. The Sidewalk was also redone to include landscaping, street trees, and permeable pavement in areas.
Outcome measures/metrics:
This project will drastically improve the walkability and safety of this corridor for the future.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
1 star - Action 4:

Identify, prioritize and remedy complete streets gaps and lack of connectivity/safety within your road network by, for example, adding a bike route/lane, truck route, sidewalk or mid-block alley.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochester has recently added bike lanes on West River Parkway, as well as in the process of adding lanes to 19th st. NW, and Highway 14.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
2 star - Action 5:

Identify and remedy street-trail gaps between city streets and off-road trails/bike trails to better facilitate walking and biking.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochester recently remedied two street segments. The first was the addition of a bridge crossing highway 14, to allow pedestrians to safely cross the highway. The second is underpass near Kutzky Park that allows pedestrians to cross 16th street. The Douglas Trail is also a very expansive bike trail that leads from Rochester out to Douglas, MN. This trail is very popular with residents
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Charlie Reiter (City staff) | reiter.charlie@co.olmsted.mn.us | 507-328-7136
1 star - Action 6:

Implement traffic calming policy/measures, including lane conversions (road diets), roundabouts, shared space and depaving, in at least one street redevelopment project.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochester recently implemented traffic calming measures near two schools, Folwell and GAGE. They implemented speed bumps, extended crosswalks, medians.
Outcome measures/metrics:
They have dramatically decreased the average speed of the area, and also allows pedestrians to feel more comfortable crossing the streets.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Charlie Reiter (City staff) | reiter.charlie@co.olmsted.mn.us | 507-328-7136

Mobility Options {BP no.12}

1 star - Action 1:

Increase walking, biking and transit use by one or more of the following means:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Active Living Rochester launched a new public safety campaign called "SEE. SAFE.SMART. Rochester". The campaign, which will appear on billboards, bus signs and in other high-traffic areas, was developed to promote safe walking, biking and driving on Rochester roads.

The campaign's goal is to foster more active, healthy lifestyles while raising awareness that safety is still the number one priority on the city's roads, paths and sidewalks.

The genesis of the campaign is to reduce the likelihood of crashes between pedestrians, bicyclists and motorists. In the last decade, more than 500 pedestrians and bicyclists were killed and another 20,000 injured on Minnesota's roads.

In 2012 Rochester became recognized as a bicycle friendly community at the Bronze level.

Bicycle and bus maps and routes are available for download on the city website and are very easily accessible.

Rochester recently added wayfinding signs along the bike and pedestrian trails identifying key destinations and mileage. There are also frequently maps showing where one is on the map. The City also added multiple Bike repair stations throughout the city trails.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
2 star - Action 2:

Conduct an Active Living campaign such as a Safe Routes to School program.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The Safe Routes to School Program was established under the "Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act  A Legacy for Users" (SAFETEA-LU). The act will provide $612 million over the next five years for Safe Route to School Programs throughout the United States. The purpose of the program is to improve the conditions and quality of bicycling and walking to school. The goal of the program is to reverse the 30-year decline in the number of children walking to school and to reintroduce opportunities for regular physical activity.
Outcome measures/metrics:
The program is aimed at K-8 educational facilities and the grant can be used to fund Infrastructure or Non-Infrastructure projects. Representative projects in each category include:

Infrastructure
Non-Infrastructure
Crosswalk Improvements
Safe Route Plan
Filling Gaps in Bike/Pedestrian Networks Enforcement or Enforcement Training
Creating New Bike/Pedestrian Facilities Education Program
Traffic Calming/Driver Feedback Signs Promotional Events
Bike Parking
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
3 star - Action 3:

Prominently identify mobility options: transit; paratransit/Dial-A-Ride; ridesharing/cab services; rental cars; bikes; airports.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochester's city website has a very easy drop down tab "I want to ; with a link to look up bus schedules. The link also includes numbers and access to contact the ZIPS car service, information about bikes on buses, Bus route maps, schedules, and fares. There is also a link for google trip planner, which will show how to get to your destination using the bus system, and pedestrian infrastructure.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
1 star - Action 6:

Add/expand transit service, or promote car/bike sharing.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
in 2012 rochester added 2 new Park & Ride locations added to the South side of Rochester. Wehrenberg Theater will replace Target South on the 15D route. Wal-Mart South will be added on the NEW 6D route.
The City of Rochester has a great intermodal transportation system to help you get to your destination faster and with less hassle than other comparable metro areas. A system of Park & Ride lots enables you to drive your vehicle into town, park at one of several safe, convenient locations, then board a city bus to take you to your final destination. People who use this system often get to their destination less stressed than fellow commuters, and actually help to relieve the amount of congestion and improve the air quality in our city. This system is especially great for those making trips to Mayo clinic facilities and other destinations downtown where parking can be limited.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132

Efficient City Fleets {BP no.13}

2 star - Action 3:

Phase-in operational changes, equipment changes including electric vehicles, and no-idling practices for city or local transit fleets.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
d. Alternative fuel vehicles. [?]
Rochesters bus fleet have recently been retrofitted with new diesel technology, which allows them to run b5% biodiesel. Which puts out nearly zero emissions.
e. Charging stations (solar or wind powered) for plug-in hybrid and full electric vehicles.
Rochester currently has 3 Charging stations, one is located at Rochester Public Utilities, the other 2 are located in parking garages downtown.
f. Lower-carbon fuels (such as biodiesel above the State-mandated 5%, straight vegetable oil) using a life-cycle calculation. See point D.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Tony Benson (City staff) | tbenson@rpu.org | 507-280-1534
1 star - Action 4:

Phase in bike, e-bike, foot or horseback modes for police, inspectors and other city staff.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochester has police officers patrolling on bicycles in the downtown area.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
2 star - Action 5:

Document that the local school bus fleet has optimized routes, start times, boundaries, vehicle efficiency and fuels, driver actions to cut costs including idling reduction, and shifting students from the bus to walking, biking and city transit.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochester's public school transportation service recently upgraded their computer route generating software over to Transfinder software. Transfinder is a leader in school transportation management, district-wide communications, GPS integration, fleet maintenance, and outreach to parents and the community. This program enables the city to;
• Provide safe and reliable student transportation;
• Allocate and manage transportation assets to optimal performance;
• Adjust to day-to-day schedule, school, or route changes;
• Ensure a smooth transition to meet the challenges of regionalization and/or redistricting;
• Communicate and interact in real time with district-wide personnel, teachers, parents and the community; and
• Meet budgetary challenges without reducing the quality of services.
The bus drivers in the district also maintain and abide by a 5 minute wait for the idle policy to come into play. The buses are also equipped with GPS to ensure tracking and avoiding excessive driving. The transportation service is looking at finding ways to finance alternative fuel buses in years to come.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Phil Wheeler (City staff) | wheeler.phil@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7101
1 star - Action 6:

Retrofit city diesel engines or install auxiliary power units and/or electrified parking spaces, utilizing Project GreenFleet or the like.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Green Fleet a few years back and retro fitted 8 pre- filter Detroits Diesels. Since then we have updated the fleet with all new diesel technologies with filters as standard. The 2010 also have an after burn system using urea. The fleet uses B5  5% soybean.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Anthony Knauer (City staff) | tknauer@rochestermn.gov | 3282401

Demand-Side Travel Planning {BP no.14}

1 star - Action 1:

Reduce or eliminate parking minimums: add parking maximums; develop district parking.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
These guidelines are intended to help create a safe and comfortable environment for pedestrians, vehicles and multiple transit modes. They presume that Urban Village mixed use development
efforts have achieved a successful critical mass. Therefore they are designed to be applicable to
the future desired conditions of mixed use, density, and street-level activities. Until that future
condition is in place, some exceptions to these guidelines may be approved for projects developed early in the evolution of the Urban Village.
Recommendations: General
" The off-street parking requirements contained in the Citys existing zoning ordinances should be reduced in the Urban Village to reflect its proximity to the Citys major employment center, existing public parking, and mass transit. "
Zoning code requirements for parking should identify the maximum parking allowed. "
Additional reductions in off-street parking requirements will be considered when options such as sheltered bicycle parking, participation in car share programs, and other programs, reduce the need for private automobiles. "
Where uses have different peak parking demands, shared parking agreements should be facilitated. "
Consideration should be given to exempting small retail establishments from parking requirements.
8/4/2009 13
" Enclosed parking is encouraged. Parking lots are discouraged, but permitted when they adhere to design guidelines.
" Parking costs should be unbundled from residence purchase costs, rental rates, and employee benefits.
" Payments in lieu of providing required parking should be considered, as well as land banking to satisfy potential future needs.
" Central off-street parking may be needed in selected locations within the Urban Village.
On-Street Parking
" On-street parking may be considered when calculating parking requirements.
" Meter limits should be set to encourage turnover adjacent to retail establishments.
" Use angled parking wherever possible to maximize number of spaces.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
1 star - Action 3:

For cities with regular transit service, require or provide incentives for the siting of higher density housing at transit/density nodes.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
62.652
Medium Density Residential Development: The criteria listed in this paragraph will be considered in granting bonus density in the R-3 zoning districts:
1. Making provisions in the development for integration of double wide or other types of manufactured housing with site built dwellings.
2. Energy Conservation: Site design and building orientation laid out in such a manner so as to reduce or provide for the potential reduction in energy consumption. Features to be considered are:
1. The placement of higher densities on south facing slopes;
2. Taller buildings sighted towards the north portion of the site, but with sufficient setback so as not to shade properties to the north.
3. The criteria listed in Paragraph 62.657.
4. The criteria listed in Paragraph 62.658.
62.653
High Density Residential Development: The criteria listed in this will be considered in granting bonus density in the R-4 and CDC-Residential zoning districts:
1. A minimum of one parking space per unit is enclosed within a structure on the site or is located within 100 feet of the site and linked to the building by means of an enclosed walkway or other enclosed passage.
2. Architectural features designed to enhance the livability and amenity of the dwelling units, either individually or collectively, are included in the building design. Features to be considered are:
1. The use of increased setbacks, above the minimum ordinance requirement, along at least sixty (60%) percent of the walls;
2. The provision of observation decks or rooftop terraces;
3. The provision of balconies or other private outdoor spaces for the use of individual residences; or
4. The design of common open space on the lot in such a manner that direct sunlight reaches the space during the majority of the daylight hours.
3. Inclusion in the project of pedestrian oriented amenities such as designated off-street loading zones, heated or covered sidewalks, and multiple building entrances.
4. Provision of streetscape improvements by the developer, including boulevard landscaping, street lighting, or sitting areas where appropriate.
5. Security conscious design incorporating features such as elevators that are visible from adjacent public spaces, outdoor spaces that are visible from the lobby or the dwelling units, and the lighting of parking areas.
6. The criteria listed in Paragraph 62.657.
7. The criteria listed in Paragraph 62.658.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
2 star - Action 4:

Adopt a travel demand management plan for city employees or incorporate into development regulations TDM or transit-oriented development standards or LEED for Neighborhood Development certification.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
In 2008, 71% of all downtown bound work trips were made by single occupant vehicle commuters (drive alone). The RDMP sets an aggressive goal of reducing the drive alone mode share to 60% of all work trips in 2020 and 50% of work trips in 2030. It is important to realize that work travel makes up only a small portion of overall daily trips, but the concentration of these trips at peak travel hours has a significant impact on traffic operations
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132

Environmental Management Environmental Management

Sustainable Purchasing {BP no.15}

1 star - Action 1:

Adopt a sustainable purchasing policy or administrative guidelines/practices directing that the city purchase at least:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochester is currently working on developing and adopting a purchasing policy that would require city departments to, when financially feasible, available, and practicable to purchase EnergyStar certified equipment for use in its buildings. The policy would also include the requirement of city departments to purchase paper containing at least 30% post-consumer recycled and content or higher, again when it is financially feasible, available, and practicable. Rochester has been an early adopter of green initiatives and aims to enact this policy and hold it with high regard.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
2 star - Action 5:

Set minimum standards for the percentage of recycled-content material in asphalt and roadbed aggregate or other construction materials, and for compost and warm mix asphalt use.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
1. Aggregate -We changed our gravel or aggregate base from Class 2 to Class 5 which allows the gravel base to be salvaged/recycled aggregate mixtures MnDOT 3138
(this occurred about 4-5 years ago and is now on the plan for the next spec book update)

2. Asphalt -2360 calls for recycled base courses and first lift of an overlay on a roadway

3. Concrete pavements
most concrete pavements and sidewalks have fly ash for cementitious substitutions

4. most concrete pipes use Cement substitutions as addressed in 2461.3D are hereby modified as follows to allow:
(a) 30 percent Class F or Class C fly ash by weight
(b) 35 percent ground granulated blast furnace slag by weight
(c) 35 percent substitution with a combination of ground granulated blast furnace slag and Type F or Type C fly ash by weight
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:

Urban Forests and Soils {BP no.16}

1 star - Action 1:

Certify as a Tree City USA.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochester has been a Tree City USA for over 28 years.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
1 star - Action 3:

Budget for and achieve resilient urban canopy/tree planting goals.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochester has continually assessed their tree canopy. Currently Rochesters tree canopy is at 27% with a total potential of 47%. The percent of water in the city is currently 2.7% while impervious land accounts for 22%
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jacob Ryg (City staff) | jryg@rochestermn.gov | 507-328-2515
3 star - Action 4:

Maximize tree planting along your main downtown street or throughout the city.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochester's Tree ordinance which was implemented during late 2009 is making great strides to begin maximizing and improving tree planting along all streets and newly developed streets through out the city. The ordinance requires all new development and redevelopment either pay in lieu of or plant trees as recommended by the city forester with in the right of the way on the designated property if trees do not currently exist or meet the new ordinance.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
1 star - Action 5:

Adopt a tree preservation or native landscaping ordinance.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochester has an ordinance that allows and encourages native species to be used for landscaping. 48.05
Natural landscape permits are available and required from the Park Department if the proposed landscape includes planting of native grasses that exceed 10 inches in height.

Rochester also has a very extensive tree ordinance.
Outcome measures/metrics:
http://www.rochestermn.gov/departments/planning_zoning/chapter64/64160BOULEVARDTREEPLANTING.asp
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jacob Ryg (City staff) | jryg@rochestermn.gov | 507-328-2515

Stormwater Management {BP no.17}

1 star - Action 3:

Adopt by ordinance one or more of the following stormwater infiltration/management strategies:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
In Rochesters Long Range Transportation plan it is stated there are a few instances where a 24 foot wide street would be acceptable. If a street is designated residential collector with no on-street parking, then a 24 ft street would be allowed. It is also allowed for a local residential 2-way street with C&G and no on side parking, or a local residential street with swale drainage and ADT >300
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
3 star - Action 4:

Create a stormwater utility that uses variable fees to incentivize stormwater infiltration, minimize the volume of and pollutants in runoff, and educate property owners.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochester has adopted a Storm Water Utility Fee and Incentives Manual. The manual is accessible online at http://www.rochesterstormwater.com/SWUF_Credit_Manual_2009.pdf
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Barb Huberty (City staff) | bhuberty@rochestermn.gov | 5073282401
Not rated - Action 6:

Reduce de-icing and dust suppressant salt use to prevent permanent surfacewater and groundwater pollution.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Included in Rochester's Zoning Ordinance is a chapter on Stormwater management.

62.1008

STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

General Standards
When possible, existing natural drainageways, wetlands, and vegetated soil surfaces must be used to convey, store, filter, and retain stormwater runoff before discharge to public waters.
Development must be planned and conducted in a manner that will minimize the extent of disturbed areas, runoff velocities, erosion potential, and reduce and delay runoff volumes. Disturbed areas must be stabilized and protected as soon as possible.
When development density, topographic features, and soil and vegetation conditions are not sufficient to adequately handle stormwater runoff using natural features and vegetation, various types of constructed facilities such as dikes, diversion, settling basins, and ponds may be used. Preference must be given to designs using surface drainage, vegetation, and infiltration rather than buried pipes and manmade materials and facilities.
Public utility projects located within shoreland areas will be processed through the Type II review process, and stormwater management standards will be considered in the review process.
Specific Standards
Impervious surface coverage of lots must not exceed twenty-five (25) percent of the lot area.
When constructed facilities are used for stormwater management, documentation must be provided by a qualified individual that they are designed and installed consistent with the local soil and water conservation district guidelines.
New constructed stormwater outfalls to public waters must provide for filtering or settling of suspended solids and skimming of surface debris before discharge.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jacob Ryg (City staff) | jryg@rochestermn.gov | 507-328-2515

Parks and Trails {BP no.18}

1 star - Action 1:

Make improvements within your city's system of parks, offroad trails and open spaces.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochester recently remedied two street segments. The first was the addition of a bridge crossing highway 14, to allow pedestrians to safely cross the highway. The second is underpass near Kutzky Park that allows pedestrians to cross 16th street.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Charlie Reiter (City staff) | reiter.charlie@co.olmsted.mn.us | 507-328-7136
1 star - Action 2:

Plan and budget for a network of parks, green spaces, water features and trails for areas where new development is planned.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Required dedication of parkland and trails with all new developments. If area is already adjacent to existing park area, then a standard fee that would have normally taken place will be assessed.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
1 star - Action 3:

Achieve minimum levels of city green space and maximize the percent within a ten-minute walk of community members.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochester has 37 acres of parkland per 1000 residents.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
1 star - Action 6:

Certify at least one golf course in the Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary Program.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Somerby Country Club in Byron is certified as an Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary Golf Course
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
3 star - Action 7:

Document that the operation and maintenance, or construction / remodeling, of at least one park building used an asset management tool, the SB 2030 energy standard, or a green building framework.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The recently built Cascade Meadow Wetlands and Environmental Science Center is one of Rochesters only Green Park Building, it offers a large natural landscape area for people to walk through and enjoy. The Building is LEED certified.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Tony Benson (City staff) | tbenson@rpu.org | 507-280-1534
3 star - Action 8:

Develop a program to involve community members in hands-on land restoration and stewardship projects.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
At the beginning of 2007, two citizens came to Mayor Brede with the idea of building a trash mountain. They were interested in getting community members involved in a city-wide litter clean up effort.

The Mayor brought a team of organizations together to plan and coordinate what would become aptly named, Help Make Rochester A Litter Bit Better!

During the week of April 21-28, over 1,384 volunteers city-wide scoured ditches, parks, and boulevards to pick up over 20,000 pounds of trash! Service groups, businesses, scout troops, faith groups, and 10 Neighborhood Associations registered and participated. And now it is an annual event in the City of Rochester.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
rneighbors rneighbors (Community volunteer) | Rene@RNeighbors.org | (507) 529-4150

Surface Water {BP no.19}

1 star - Action 3:

Adopt and report on measurable, publicly announced surface water improvement targets for water bodies, including the percent of lake, river, wetland and ditch shoreline with at least a 50-foot vegetation buffer.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
THE MINNESOTA POLLUTION CONTROL AGENCY (MPCA) PREPARES TOTAL MAXIMUM DAILY REPORTS (TMDLs) THAT ASSIGN WASTE LOAD ALLOCATIONS (WLAs) FOR POLLUTANTS OF CONCERN TO POINT SOURCES DISCHARGING TO THE IMPAIRED WATER BODIES. THE CITY OF ROCHESTER IS A REGULATED POINT SOURCE BY VIRTURE OF ITS MUNICIPAL SEPARATE STORM SEWER SYSTEM (MS4) PERMIT AND MUST IMPLEMENT WASTE LOAD REDUCTIONS TO MEET THE WLA. AT THIS TIME, THROUGH ITS MS4 PERMIT, THE CITY OF ROCHESTER IS SUBJECT TO LOAD REDUCTIONS FOR FECAL COLIFORM BACTERIA. WITHIN THE NEXT YEAR, IT WILL ALSO BE SUBJECT TO LOAD REDUCTIONS FOR TURBIDITY.

Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
1 star - Action 4:

Adopt a shoreland ordinance for all river and lake shoreland areas; reduce flooding and costs through The National Flood Insurance Program's Community Rating System.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
62.1000 SHORELAND DISTRICT:
The uncontrolled use of shorelands within the City of Rochester, Minnesota, affects the public health, safety, and general welfare not only by contributing to the pollution of public waters, but also by impairing the local tax base. Therefore, it is in the best interests of the public health, safety and welfare to provide for the wise subdivision, use and development of public waters. The Legislature of Minnesota has delegated this responsibility to local governments within the state. This responsibility is hereby recognized by the City of Rochester.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Barb Huberty (City staff) | bhuberty@rochestermn.gov | 5073282401

Efficient Water and Wastewater Systems {BP no.20}

3 star - Action 6:

Implement a wastewater plant efficiency project (co-generation, water reuse) or a program for local private business operations (water conservation, water reuse, business co-location).

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochester has 2 main co-generator plants that supply a majority of the city. Franklin Heating Station, primarily serves Mayo Clinic, while Rochester Public Utilities is a more comprehensive supplier for the city.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Tony Benson (City staff) | tbenson@rpu.org | 507-280-1534

Septic Systems {BP no.21}

2 star - Action 5:

Create a program to finance septic system upgrades.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochesters Water Quality Protection Program started in 1998. It provides a financial subsidy to reduce city sewer and water costs to the property owner. it has been used in 31 subdivisions to eliminate 1500 septic systems and provide city sewer service. No payment or interest charges are required until a date 3 years after a project is awarded to serve your neighborhood. Thereafter, uniform payments can be made over a period of 10 years at 7.5% annually on the unpaid balance. No connection is required until a date 5 years after a project is awarded to serve your neighborhood.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Tony Benson (City staff) | tbenson@rpu.org | 507-280-1534
1 star - Action 6:

Work with homeowners and businesses in environmentally sensitive areas and areas where standard septic systems are not the least-cost option to promote innovative waste water systems, including central sewer extensions.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochester is at this time working with residents of existing older subdivisions in Oronoco township, designing and constructing a cluster or shared septic system to serve 13 existing sites with limited or no septic system locations available because of such small lot sizes.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Phil Wheeler (City staff) | wheeler.phil@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7101

Sustainable Consumption and Waste {BP no.22}

2 star - Action 6:

Improve recycling services and expand to multi-unit housing and commercial businesses.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Subs. 3. Residential Recycling. Residential Generators must ensure the segregation and delivery of, at
a minimum, newsprint, glass containers, corrugated cardboard, aluminum cans and aluminum scrap to a
Recycling Center, either by Self-Hauling or by contract with a licensed Commercial Hauler. Where owners
and/or managers of multi-unit residential buildings provide for Collection of Mixed Municipal Solid Waste,
central Collection locations for Recyclable Materials generated on its premises must also be provided.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File: view file
1 star - Action 7:

Improve/organize residential trash, recycling and organics collection by private and/or public operations and offer significant volume-based pricing on residential garbage and/or incentives for recycling.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The County provides incentives to encourage waste reduction
through volume-based fees. By reducing the amount of waste produced, recycling,
composting and utilizing the hazardous waste facility, citizens get the most for their
money and can potentially reduce the amount they pay for disposal. The County intends
to continue to be a positive example to local municipalities, businesses and residents by
reducing waste generated from County sources and providing information and
assistance to businesses and residents. The County encourages waste reduction and
reuse through its educational outlets. Ongoing public education will continue to be
provided to motivate businesses and citizens to reduce the amount of waste they
produce and to support the Minnesota Materials Exchange and other waste
reduction/reuse programs.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
1 star - Action 8:

Adopt a construction and demolition ordinance governing demolition permits that requires a level of recycling and reuse for building materials and soil/land-clearing debris.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochester has a strict regulation for construction sites to enforce the seperation of recycled materials and waste.
"Subs. 4. Construction Sites. Generators of Solid Waste at Construction Sites must ensure the
separation of Mixed Municipal Solid Waste and Recyclable Materials either on-site or through the use of a
service provider offering such separation. Disposal of Construction Debris and Demolition Debris must be
in accordance with a facility’s approved Industrial Solid Waste Management Plan. Any Solid Waste
generated at construction sites shall be placed in acceptable containers as specified in this Ordinance. No
burning, burying or dumping of Solid Waste generated at construction sites shall occur at locations other
than permitted facilities, including brush and tree waste. "
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:

Local Air Quality {BP no.23}

1 star - Action 2:

Regulate outdoor wood burning, using ordinance language, performance standards and bans as appropriate, for at least one of the following:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Definition of recreational fire: The burning of materials, other than rubbish, contained in an outdoor fireplace, barbecue grill, or pit and with a fuel area 3 feet or less in diameter and 2 feet or less in height, for pleasure, religious, ceremonial, cooking or similar purpose. Recreational fires shall be conducted in accordance with the following:
The purpose of the fire must be recreational and not to dispose of refuse, household waste, leaves, brush, trees, or construction materials. The fuel may only be charcoal or fire wood cut for that purpose. RCO 141.12
The fire must not be greater than 3 feet in diameter and shall not be conducted within 25 feet of structures, and combustible materials or 15 feet if contained within an *approved barbecue pit or grill. Conditions, which could cause the fire to spread to within 25 feet of a structure, shall be eliminated prior to ignition. RFC 307.4.2
*An approved barbecue grill or outdoor fireplace must be designed, built and marketed specifically for outdoor cooking or burning. These appliances must be used in accordance with the manufacture's recommendations.
*An approved barbecue pit or ring is not larger than 36 inches in diameter or 9 square feet constructed of noncombustible materials and provides a 12" minimum enclosure depth above materials to be burned.
Fire extinguishing equipment such as buckets, shovels, garden hose or fire extinguisher, having a 4A rating, must be available to extinguish and control the fire. RFC 307.5 A person knowledgeable in fire safety and extinguishment shall be in attendance at all times, until the fire is completely extinguished. When extinguished, the fire must not be allowed to smolder. RFC 307.5
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
2 star - Action 5:

Install, assist with and promote publicly available EV charging stations or public fueling stations for alternative fuel vehicles. 

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochester currently has three public charging stations. One of the stations is located downtown, the second is located at RPU customer parking, and the third is located on the Rochester community and technical college campus.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Tony Benson (City staff) | tbenson@rpu.org | 507-280-1534

Resilient Economic & Community Development Resilient Economic and Community Development

Benchmarks and Community Engagement {BP no.24}

2 star - Action 1:

Use a city commission, or committee to lead, coordinate, and report to and engage community members on implementation of sustainability best practices.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochester's Energy Commission meets monthly, and is in charge of informing community members regarding the progress of the MInnesota GreenStep Cities project. The agenda and minutes from each meeting are then posted on the Rochester's Energy Commission website for all to access. The website also provides links for community members own interests.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Currently Rochester is a Step 2 GreenStep City. We are completing the work in order to become a Step 3 City.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
1 star - Action 2:

Organize goals/outcome measures from all city plans and report to community members data that show progress toward meeting these goals.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Annual goals and outcome for the city of Rochester are written and presented annually at City Council Meetings that are also televised on TV. All of Rochester's Comprehensive plans, Long Range plans,Downtown master plan,Rochester urban service future land use plan, and annual updates are available online for all of the public to access for free.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:

Green Business Development {BP no.25}

1 star - Action 2:

Create or participate in a marketing/outreach program to connect businesses with assistance providers, including utilities, who provide personalized energy, waste or sustainability audits and assistance.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Rochester Public Utilities assists businesses and citizens with energy questions as well as energy audits and waste audits. RPU acts as a resource to connect business with trade allies who have experience dealing with RPU’s energy rebate programs. Since some businesses and homeowners may not know whom to contact for energy-efficient construction and audits, RPU provides a list of qualified firms to interested parties.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Tony Benson (City staff) | tbenson@rpu.org | 507-280-1534
1 star - Action 3:

Promote sustainable tourism in your city, and green tourism resources to tourism and hospitality businesses in/around the city.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Cascade Meadows is a new wetland demonstration and environmental awareness complex with LEED Platinum certification. RPU is a sponsor and collaborated in several elements of the facility, including water management, solar and wind power generation, and energy efficiency improvements. RPU promotes and encourages visitors, businesses, and citizens to tour this facility to become educated on emerging green technologies that can be applied to new and renovated homes and other buildings. Rochester also promotes the Minnesota Bio Business center as a green education building.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Tony Benson (City staff) | tbenson@rpu.org | 507-280-1534
3 star - Action 5:

Lower the environmental and health risk footprint of a brownfield remediation/redevelopment project beyond regulatory requirements; report brightfield projects.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Site Description and History

At the time of acquisition, the Site was comprised of two separate tax parcels (the 219 1 st Avenue
Parcel and the 223 1st Avenue Parcel). At the time and for a number of years prior to the City’s
acquisition of the Site, both parcels were used as surface parking lots. Following is a description
of both parcels:

The 219 Parcel consisted of 14,300 square feet of land that historically supported two dry
cleaning facilities; historical structures were demolished prior to the construction of the parking
lot. The Site and the general Site vicinity has been developed since prior to 1884 for residential/
commercial use. The historical activities at the Site related to the dry cleaning facilities involved
the use of tetrachoroethylene (PCE). The previous Site Owner enrolled this parcel in the MPCA
VIC Program. Based on previous environmental investigations conducted by DPRA, Inc.
(DPRA) on behalf of the previous Site Owner, DPRA designed and installed and operated a dual
phase extraction (DPE) system (utilizing one extraction well) to address reported releases of PCE
at the parcel.

The 223 Parcel consisted of approximately 4,300 square feet of land that historically was used
as a stable and later as a hotel and then as the Lawler Movie Theatre; historical structures were
demolished prior to the construction of the surface parking lot. As stated, the Site and the
general Site vicinity has been developed since prior to 1884 for residential/commercial use.
These historical activities at the Site likely did not involve the use of significant quantities of
hazardous substances or petroleum products.

The City completed a Phase I Environmental Site Assessment (ESA) and a Phase II
Environmental Site Investigation (Phase II Investigation) prior to acquisition. Based on the
findings from the Phase I ESA and the results, of the Phase II Investigation, Landmark prepared
a Voluntary Response Action Plan (VRAP) on behalf of the City. The VRAP provided specific
steps to prevent the continued releases, prevent future releases and limit the exposure to any
previous releases of hazardous substances were addressed by implementing the RAs described
in the MPCA-approved VRAP and the contingency actions described in the MPCA-approved
Environmental Contingency Plan (ECP). The MPCA approved the VRAP and the ECP. The
specific steps in the VRAP involved off-site disposal of contaminated soil to a permitted landfill,
the installation of a vapor barrier and venting system and the installation and long-term operation
of a new and expanded DPE system to remediate contaminated groundwater under the Site.

The new DPE system, which was installed during 2008 in the basement of the new building,
consists of eight extraction wells capable of simultaneously extracting groundwater and soil
vapor. The DPE system was designed to dewater the fractured bedrock zone to expose pockets
of source area volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Once the fractured bedrock zone is
dewatered, the DPE system will remove source area VOCs by soil vapor extraction. In addition
to the DPE system, the VRAP also proposed to install a vapor barrier and venting system under
the entire building to address any potential vapor intrusion into the building. The vapor barrier
was installed beneath the basement slab, on the subsurface sidewalls of the proposed building

and around the proposed tunnel located on the adjacent property. The venting system includes a
rotary wind turbine on each of the stacks located on the roof of the building. The venting system
was designed with shutoff valves to prevent venting system operation while the new DPE system
is operational. This is to prevent the DPE system from extracting atmospheric air through the
passive venting system. The venting system was installed for use after the new DPE system has
removed the source area contamination at the Property and is no longer needed.
Outcome measures/metrics:
The Minnesota Bio Business Center represents the City of Rochester's commitment to the future
in many ways. As a center for innovation in biotechnology, the building will promote the linkages
between the researchers and practitioners at Mayo Clinic; instructors and students at the University
of Minnesota Rochester, and the biotechnology business community.

The building occupies a key location in our downtown community - turning what was once an
underutilized parking lot with contaminated soil into a vibrant anchor for Rochester's urban village.

The building also represents a commitment to the future in the way that it uses our natural and
human resources. Sustainable design in general and energy efficiency in particular were primary
guiding factors in the design of the building. Our team designed the building to be LEED Certified,
and we believe we are the upper range of this category and pushing LEED Silver.

Here are some of the key features of the design:

The building location reclaims a "Brownfield" site; and is located at the heart of the
downtown area to take advantage of existing infrastructure and amenities; and to be close to
mass transportation.
The roof is white to reduce the urban heat island effect.
The window systems have high-efficiency frames and the glass is "tuned" with different
proportions and coatings on each face of the building to respond to the location of sun and
natural light.
Sun shades block the summer sun on the south, and innovative louvers are placed inside the
upper pane of glass to reflect natural light in - reducing the need for electric light.
The heating ventilating and air conditioning system utilize a desiccant wheel energy recovery
system so that very little heat is lost through exhaust or ventilation air.
Pumps and motors use highly efficient variable speed drives.
Plumbing fixtures use low flow faucets and flush valves.
While not all of the numbers are in, we believe the building will utilize 30% less energy than
the standards set by the Minnesota Energy Code.
And the low-flow plumbing fixtures will save as much as 600,000 gallons of water per year.
During construction almost 75% of construction waste was recycled.

















Finally, the people who will occupy the building will gain the benefit of as much natural light and
clean air as possible. Interior finish materials were chosen with high recycled material content and
low voc emissions. The adjacent parking lot was reduced in size at the upper levels to maximize the
amount of daylight entering the occupied floors. This also allows for a vegetated rooftop garden
visible from the fourth floor.

Many of these features are invisible to most people in their day-to-day lives and we feel that's how it
should be. Sustainable design is simply good design and good design often stays out of the limelight
providing the most comfortable environment for people, and encouraging them to do their best at
what they do best.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Terry Spaeth (City staff) | tspaeth@rochestermn.Gov | 5073282008

Renewable Energy {BP no.26}

2 star - Action 1:

Adopt wind energy and/or biomass ordinances that allow, enable, or encourage appropriate renewable energy installations.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
SOLAR COLLECTION SYSTEM:
A panel, array of panels or other solar energy device, the primary purpose of which is to provide for the collection, inversion, storage, and distribution of solar energy for electricity generation, space heating, space cooling or water heating. When a solar collection system is built to serve a principal use on a property or as a part of a development site, the system shall be considered an accessory use.
SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEM:
A set of devices whose primary purpose is to collect solar energy and convert and store it for useful purposes including heating and cooling buildings or other energy-using processes, or to produce generated power by means of any combination of collecting, transferring or converting solar-generated energy, and including but not limited to photovoltaic devices. When a solar energy system is built to serve a principal use on a property or as a part of a development site, the system shall be considered an accessory use.
Outcome measures/metrics:
62.650 Categories of bonuses http://www.rochestermn.gov/departments/planning_zoning/Chapter%2062/62650C ATEGORIES_OF_BONUSES.asp?Printable=true

http://www.rochestermn.gov/departments/planning_zoning/Chapter%2062/62930A REA_ACCESSORY_DEVELOPMENT.asp?Printable=true
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132
1 star - Action 6:

Report installed private sector-owned renewable energy/energy efficient generation capacity with at least one of the following attributes:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Presented in February 2012 to Kepware Technologies, Inc. for its support of a building automation system at Cascade Meadow. In order to bring data from power production systems, building power consumption meters, and other building mechanical systems together into one database, Cascade Meadow looked to Integrated Technology Engineering, a local firm, and Kepware. Today data from three separate systems can be monitored from one central dashboard, providing instant information about the energy efficiency of the Center – information that’s shared with visitors to the site and used for educational forums.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jeff Ellerbusch (City staff) | ellerbusch.jeff@CO.OLMSTED.MN.US | 507-328-7132

Local Food {BP no.27}

1 star - Action 3:

Create, assist with and promote local food production/distribution within the city:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The Rochester Downtown Farmers Market is a project of the Rochester Downtown Farmers Market Association, seeking to support sustainable agriculture and the family farm by sponsoring a market to provide farmers with a well-organized retail marketplace, to provide local access to quality farm products, and to strengthen the ties between the family farm and the community.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
rochester Farmers Market (Community volunteer) | rochfarmmkt@hotmail.com | 507-273-8232