City Detail

Background Information

City of Shakopee
County: Scott
Population: 41,519
GreenStep City category: A
Full-time equivalent city staff (approx.): 158
Participating township, county, school:

GreenStep Coordinator

Andrew Boucher
City Staff
952-233-9325
City web page relating to sustainability/GreenStep activities:
GreenStep City resolution: Click here to view the file.
GreenStep City status and date: STEP 2 ( )

City Assessment Files and City Performance Metrics

City councils pass a resolution to join the GreenStep program and are recognized at Step 1. Step 2 and Step 3 recognition levels reflect completed city actions, reported and rated below with stars (1 star = good, 2 stars = better, 3 stars = best). The Assessment File below summarizes completed city actions in a short Word file. Step 4 recognition is awarded to cities who report a minimum number of core metrics for the previous calendar year. These metrics aim to show the aggregate, quantitative results of taking multiple GreenStep actions. Step 5 cities show improvement in the Step 4 metrics. See yearly data for Steps 4&5. Additional city data can be found by reviewing information on B3 Benchmarking and Regional Indicators Initiative.

Assessment File

Best Practice Actions Underway and Completed

Completed actions are denoted by stars.

Total completed actions: 41
1 star actions: 20
2 star actions: 11
3 star actions: 10

Buildings and Lighting Buildings and Lighting

Efficient Existing Public Buildings {BP no.1}

3 star - Action 1:

Enter/update building information into the MN B3 Benchmarking database, and routinely enter monthly usage data for all city-owned buildings/infrastructure that consume energy/water.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2016
Implementation details:
Shakopee began entering electricity and gas consumption into the MN B3 Benchmarking website in 2016 with historical data going back to 2006, and recently updated our benchmarking to include water consumption. We will continue to monitor trends in these buildings and will look for ways we can improve our efficiency.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Karen Macklin (City Staff) | kmacklin@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9328
3 star - Action 2:

Make no/low cost indoor lighting and operational changes in city-owned/school buildings to reduce energy costs.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2019
Implementation details:
In 2012, the Public Works building improved its lighting by converting from T12 to T8 lighting.

During the October 2016 remodel, the Community Center upgraded 50% of the interior lighting to LED and installed Variable-Frequency Drives.

In October 2016, the Ice Arena installed 90% interior LED lighting and updated the building exterior as well as the parking lot to LED lighting.

When City Hall was completed in August 2017, all of the indoor lighting installed was LED as well as powered over Ethernet - low voltage and installed a sensor to reduce boiler usage.

In 2018, the exterior lights on the Community Center were upgraded to LED lighting. In 2019, the upper parking lot lighting was upgraded to LED lighting.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Duane Toenyan (City Staff) | dtoenyan@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9352
2 star - Action 3:

Invest in larger energy efficiency projects through performance contracting or other funding or through smaller retro-commissioning/retrofit projects in city-owned/school buildings.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2012
Implementation details:
In 2010, the Police Department replaced its water heater and boiler with a high efficiency water heater and boiler.

In 2012, the City of Shakopee along with the Metropolitan Council and CenterPoint Energy performed a series of retrofits for the Blue Lake Wastewater Treatment Plant. The heat recovery system installed on the dryer scrubber system which allows the system to recover 1.85 MMBtu/hr of waste hot water from an odor control system to maintain the digester’s operating temperature of 98 F, eliminating all heating requirements of the digesters whenever the dryer is operating. The biogas will be used to fuel boilers for heating the control building. Solids removed from the wastewater are dewatered, dried and pelletized for use as an agriculture fertilizer, under a public-private partnership between MCES and the New England Fertilizer Company (NEFCO) and an additional treatment process, anaerobic digestion, produces methane gas that helps power the solids drying equipment. The existing dryer burner equipment was retrofitted to burn either natural gas or the in-house produced biogas with 55-60% of the heat content of natural gas. Other improvements made at Blue Lake include premium efficiency pump motors, motor drives, and the replacement of air diffusers and additional valves have provided better control over dissolved oxygen and improved oxygen transfer.

During the October 2016 remodel, the Community Center upgraded 50% of the interior lights to LED lighting and installed Variable-Frequency Drives.

In 2017, the Public Works building replaced 12 out of its 22 parking lot lighting fixtures and converted to LED lighting- 350 W bulbs replaced 50 W LED bulbs.

In 2017, the Fire Station parking lot lighting fixtures converted to LED lighting - 400 W bulbs replaced with 100 W LED bulbs.

In 2018, the exterior lights on the Community Center were upgraded to LED lighting. In 2019, the upper parking lot lighting was upgraded to LED lighting and computer monitors were upgraded from older CRT monitors to newer LED monitors to improve energy efficiency.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
The use of the anaerobic digestor produced energy savings equivalent to the annual gas usage of 900 residential customers per year and reduced consumption of purchased natural gas by 80%. The heat recovery system installed on the dryer scrubber system which allows the system to recover 1.85 MMBtu/hr of waste hot water from an odor control system to maintain the digester’s operating temperature of 98 F, eliminating all heating requirements of the digesters whenever the dryer is operating.

The Metropolitan Council projected and documented energy savings of 80,000 Dth/year is about 80% of the dryer’s pre-project energy consumption and reduces the mass of the solids loading to be dried by 30%.
Descriptive File: view file
Metropolitan Council, Xcel Energy, CenterPoint Energy
For more information contact:
Duane Toenyan (City Staff) | dtoenyan@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9352
1 star - Action 4:

Implement information technology efforts and city employee engagement to reduce plug loads, building energy use and workflow efficiency.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2017
Implementation details:
During the October 2016 remodel, the Community Center installed and implemented Variable-Frequency Drives.

In 2017, the City utilized software from the vendor Automated Logic to control and operate City Hall's HVAC from the Facilities Maintenance Supervisor's computer as well as vendor software the Recreation Facilities Manager controls to operate the cooling system for the ice rink.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Duane Toenyan (City Staff) | dtoenyan@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9352
2 star - Action 6:

Improve the operations & maintenance of city-owned/school buildings and leased buildings by using a customized online energy efficiency tool, asset management tool, green building framework or green lease.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2020
Implementation details:
In 2020, the City began to utilize and implement e-Maintenance to manage assets and track maintenance schedules.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Duane Toenyan (City Staff) | dtoenyan@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9352

Building Redevelopment {BP no.5}

3 star - Action 2:

Implement the Minnesota Main Street model for commercial revitalization.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2014
Implementation details:
Downtown Shakopee is an accredited Main Street Program through the Shakopee Chamber & Visitors Bureau. They are a collaborative, community-wide effort to revitalize our downtown district.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jenn Brewington (City Staff) | jbrewington@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9317

Land Use Land Use

Comprehensive, Climate and Energy Plans {BP no.6}

2 star - Action 1:

Adopt a comprehensive plan or (for Category B & C cities) adopt a future land use plan that was adopted by the county or a regional entity.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2019
Implementation details:
The City of Shakopee adopted a new 2040 Comprehensive Plan in 2019. The plan includes goals for the natural environment, non-motorized transportation, and increased density.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
3 star - Action 2:

Demonstrate that regulatory ordinances comply with the comprehensive plan including but not limited to having the zoning ordinance explicitly reference the comprehensive plan as the foundational document for decision making.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2019
Implementation details:
In the Subdivision Regulations/Ordinance, Shakopee Code 150.01(B)(1-5), the Comprehensive Plan is referenced as a foundational document that sets the purpose of the code to implement the goals of the plan in protecting and promoting the public health, safety, and general welfare of the city.

In the Zoning Ordinance/Chapter, Shakopee Code 151.001(B)(1-11), the Comprehensive Plan is referenced as a foundational document and determines that the purpose of the code is to implement the plan.

The comprehensive plan is referenced in all land use and development ordinances, regulations, and in zoning code ordinances; additionally, zoning decisions are required to be in compliance with the goals of the comprehensive plan.

Zoning and Subdivision sections contain a "Purposes" section that includes language stating the goals of the comprehensive plan and how these regulations specifically implements these goals.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Michael Kersi (City Staff) | mkerski@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9346

Resilient City Growth {BP no.7}

1 star - Action 3:

Achieve higher intensity commercial/industrial land uses through at least one of the following strategies:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 1999
Implementation details:
Our Central Business District (B-3) Zone has zero-lot-line setbacks.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Michael Kersi (City Staff) | mkerski@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9346

Mixed Uses {BP no.8}

1 star - Action 2:

Locate or lease a school, city building or other government facility that has at least two of these attributes:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2020
Implementation details:
The Scott County Government Center (highlighted in mapping document) is accessible by public transit and has a public transit component; additionally, the Center was designed and facilitated to be accessed by walking and biking and provides access to nearby businesses, residential developments, and the Central Family Center across the street.

Shakopee's City Hall (highlighted in mapping document) has combined parking facilities with the Police Department; both are accessible by walking and biking as well as provides access to nearby businesses and residential developments.

Shakopee has a number of schools, all of which have been designed with the ability to be accessed by walking and biking. The High School is located near various residential developments and centers. The Middle School is accessible by public transportation and is nearby residential developments as well as business centers. The Junior High School is accessible by public transportation, located near residential developments/centers, and is next to the Community Center, which shares the aforementioned attributes. Central Family Center is accessible by public transportation, located near residential developments/centers, and is across the street from Scott County Government Center. Sweeney Elementary is accessible by public transportation and located next to the SandVenture Aquatic Park, which also shares these same attributes. Red Oak Elementary is situated near residential developments and business centers and can be accessed by public transportation.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Andrew Boucher (City Staff) | aboucher@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9347
1 star - Action 3:

Modify a planned unit development ordinance to emphasize mixed use development, to limit residential PUDs to areas adjacent to commercial development, and/or to add sustainability features.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2018
Implementation details:
The City has has PUD District that allows for mixed uses within a development and encourages a variety of housing types, including affordable housing.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Michael Kersi (City Staff) | mkerski@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9346
1 star - Action 5:

Have a downtown zoning district that allows residential and compatible commercial development.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Office, retail, educational, civic, and residential units are all permitted in the same building in our Central Business (B-3) District.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Michael Kersi (City Staff) | mkerski@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9346

Design for Natural Resource Conservation {BP no.10}

1 star - Action 1:

Conduct a Natural Resource Inventory or Assessment (NRI or NRA); incorporate protection of priority natural systems or resources such as groundwater through the subdivision or development process.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2008
Implementation details:
In 2002, the City of Shakopee partnered with the MN DNR to commission a natural resources inventory using the MN Land Cover Classification System for lands within the City of Shakopee, Jackson and Louisville Townships

- “Land Cover of Northern Scott County – A Natural Resources Inventory of the City of Shakopee, Jackson and Louisville Townships”

To develop natural resources protection strategies and establish land use objectives incorporated into the Comprehensive Plan objectives, the Natural Resources Inventory divided the study area into regions that have similar physical context, land use, and remnant natural areas.

Shakopee City Code 151.112 – Landscaping Requirements (N)(1) and (2) require submission of a financial security through cash escrow, or other form of security the city deems acceptable, in the amount of 150% of the total tree replacement estimate, at $400 per replacement tree or as is updated in the city’s fee schedule. Additionally, the ordinance details the procedures and conditions for warranty periods and guaranteed survival.

Shakopee City Code 151.113 – Tree Preservation Regulations requires a tree preservation plan applicable to any tree removal including, a preliminary plat, final plat, minor subdivision, building permit, demolition permit, conditional use permit variance, or grading permit is required by the city on any parcel of land containing a significant tree. The city can deny or revoke any permits in violation.

The tree preservation plan must be completed by a forestry specialist and include:
- Tree inventory showing every significant tree on buildable land on the property as well as significant trees on adjacent property which have CRZ overlapping onto said property must be inventoried and tagged with a unique identification number.
- Site plan, a scaled drawing of the site including the location, identification number, and tree type (common, exceptional, or high priority) of all inventoried trees; proposed trees to remove and preserve: high priority areas and contiguous woodland area; critical root zones of all trees being preserved along with any area within critical root zone that will be impacted; proposed construction/grading limits, lot lines, building parameter, basic infrastructure, buildable land, and building footprint/elevation; locations of tree protection fence and silt fence; and soil stockpile and parking locations during construction.
o Additional requirements: a survey of the lot meeting all possible requirements of the tree inventory and site plan must be provided to the builder of the lot. The city must be provided a digital copy of the tree survey for each individual lot. Note areas with oak wilt, Dutch elm disease. Emerald Ash Borer, invasive plants such as buckthorn or others listed on the current year's State Department of Agriculture's noxious weed list.
- Tree replacement sheet: a scaled drawing of the site depicting where the replacement trees will be planted. The plan must include calculations for determination of required replacement trees and landscaping required as described in the ordinance; locations of all trees and other plants being installed on-site; plant list including species, size, and stock type of installed plants; planting details that meet the city's tree planting specifications; and easements, right-of-ways, construction limits, building pads, driveways, and basic infrastructure.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Andrew Boucher (City Staff) | aboucher@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9347
2 star - Action 3:

For cities within metropolitan areas, incorporate woodland best management practices addressing protection of wooded areas into zoning or development review.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City Of Shakopee has a Tree Preservation Policy with the intent of regarding natural features such as woodlands and bluffs as part of the community's identity, attracting residents and businesses to the area. City Council recognizes that not protecting these assets would have a quantifiable economic, social and environmental loss. An objective of the city's comprehensive plan is to preserve, enhance, and maintain natural wooded areas within the city. The policy aims to achieve this objective by encouraging responsible land development through rewarding those who use creative site design and minimize the impact to existing landscape and neighborhood character.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Kyle Sobota (City Staff) | ksobota@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9349

Transportation Transportation

Living & Complete Streets {BP no.11}

1 star - Action 1:

Adopt a complete streets policy, or a living streets policy, which addresses landscaping and stormwater.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2019
Implementation details:
The 2040 Comprehensive Plan intends to address local transportation issues and connect the city with the larger Twin Cities region by maintaining and enhancing a multi-modal transportation system. Approximately half of the street network within Shakopee lacks sidewalks with the city’s historic core being most complete, newer residential developments including sidewalks on one side, and residential areas and light industrial areas, mostly north of US Highway 169 lacking sidewalks. Many streets without sidewalks are residential streets with slow vehicle speeds and low volumes that can accommodate pedestrians in a shared street environment. Shakopee has utilized the Transit Advantages program to install bus-only shoulder lanes planned at U.S. Highway 169 between CSAH 83 and State Highway 13 and County Road 21 from U.S. Highway 169 to County Road 42. Additionally, an MNPass lane is planned both north and southbound U.S. Highway 169 from Marschall Road north to Interstate 494.

Downtown Shakopee’s primary barrier to pedestrian and bicycle circulation in this area is 1st Avenue (CSAH 101) with two lanes in each direction as well as a center turn lane. Downtown Shakopee has sidewalks on both sides of most streets and commercial building frontages are generally adjacent to the sidewalk. Traditional Neighborhood Street Grid typically (but do not always) include a sidewalk with a buffer to the motor vehicle travel lanes. Grid and Curvilinear Streets with Cul-De-Sacs contain residential street intersections may be uncontrolled or stop controlled with pedestrian crossings of arterial streets occur at widely spaced signalized intersections. Low Density Curvilinear Streets with Cul-De-Sacs contains blocks that are frequently long and irregular with sidewalks existing on one side of the street, if they’re present. Rural Road Grids have no sidewalks present.

Figure 4.25

Figure 4.45

Shakopee has over 80 miles of recreation and transportation trails typically paved with asphalt and are at least 8-feet in width to allow bike and pedestrian travelers to pass easily. Most of the city’s multi-lane streets include a trail on one side of the street and a traditional sidewalk on the opposite side. Many of the city’s parks are connected via the trail system. The Scott West Regional Trail connects Cleary Lake Regional Park and Spring Lake Regional Park in Scott County; when completed, the trail will connect to the MN Valley State Trail and nearly connect to the MN River Bluffs LRT Regional Trail with the former connection running through Downtown Shakopee providing access to the short bike lane on 10th Avenue and bicycle boulevard along Holmes Street. As Scott County makes roadway improvements, the current standard within Shakopee’s city limits is to include a 10-foot-wide side path along both edges of county roads. The Metropolitan Council has designated one Tier 1 Alignment in the Regional Bicycle and Trails Network and multiple Tier 2 Alignments and Corridors.

Mass transit services are orientated around local circulation within Shakopee and peak-period commute to Downtown Minneapolis. “Reverse commute” and “suburb to suburb” fixed routes now connect to major employment opportunities at the Amazon distribution facility and Mystic Lake Casino with three park and ride facilities; the centrally located Marschall Road Transit Station, Southbridge Crossing, and Eagle Creek serving as operational hubs providing commuters with timed transfers between express, local and shuttle services. Shakopee also utilizes SmartLink Transit and Land to Air Express to provide additional transit services.

Figure 4.26

Shakopee’s Comprehensive Plan has multiple Transit Market Areas as defined by the Metropolitan Council in the 2040 Transportation Policy Plan to aid in the distribution of transit funding within the transit investment plan and are composed of four Market Areas. Emerging Market Area II is identified as a focus area for future dense development that will be connected to areas of higher transit intensity. Market Area III is characterized by lower density and transit-supportive with pockets of higher density, so primary transit usage is express and commuter service with limited local service. Market Area IV is characterized as consistently lower density development patterns that can’t support local transit service; service in this area is mainly peak-period commuter and express service. Market Area V is defined as areas dominated by agricultural and rural residential land uses that makes the area not suited for transit service aside from limited peak-period express or commuter service.



Shakopee also has easy access to regional transportation networks and is identified as a growing freight cluster, with tier one truck routes on U.S. Highway 169 and Canterbury Road, and tier three truck routes on Highways 41 and 101.



The City of Shakopee has identified a 1.5-mile gap with no crossings between Marschall Road and Eagle Creek Boulevard where limited crossings concentrate vehicle traffic on arterial roads. Staggered construction of individual developments has resulted in self-contained neighborhood subdivisions with cul-de-sacs and limited access to arterials leading to a disconnected street system focuses vehicle traffic on major arterial roadways. Highway 101 and the railroad are barriers for all transit modes, but most intersections downtown are stop-controlled and building entrances are mostly accessible from the sidewalk.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
PeggySue Imihy (City Staff) | pimihy@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9325

Mobility Options {BP no.12}

3 star - Action 1:

Increase walking, biking and transit use by one or more of the following means:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2019
Implementation details:
The City of Shakopee’s Parks and Trails website provides users with a web-based map and a printable map both of which show the city’s park stations. These maps identify trails, bike boulevards, bike lanes, sidewalk connections, transit stations, and future trails throughout the city. 3,000 printed copies of these maps were distributed to several locations within the city, free of charge.

Additionally, the City of Shakopee has a Bicycle Facilities showing the location of installed bike racks, the quantity of bike racks at each location for a total ¬¬of 978 bike racks throughout the city, and identifies holes in bike parking.

The City’s Public Transportation website shows six transit services provided by the Minnesota Valley Transit Authority and Dial-A-Ride as well as locations of free park and rides such as; Marchall Road Transit Station, Southbridge Crossings Park and Ride, and Eagle Creek Park and Ride.
Shakopee City Code 151.143 – Required Number of Parking Spaces (G) details the bicycle infrastructure required to be provided by apartment/condominium developments with more than 8 units, institutional/educational, commercial, and industrial uses.

All facilities for required bicycle parking must meet Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals Standards for design. Racks and other facilities must not interfere with accessible paths of travel, or accessible parking as required by the Americans with Disabilities Act. Bicycle parking must be located at least as close to the main entrance of a building as the nearest non-accessible/handicapped parking space, or 100 feet, whichever is less. Multi-tenant buildings are permitted to have 1 centrally located bicycle parking area. Bicycle parking facilities may be placed in public right-of-way with the approval of the Public Works Director, or designee. Outdoor racks must be in areas that are lit by exterior lighting. Use of building or pole mounted lighting is acceptable. An area of at least 2 feet x 6 feet of clear space is required for each bicycle parking space. Bicycle racks directly adjacent to automobile parking areas shall be placed at least 2.5 feet from all parts of an automobile parking space to not interfere with doors, bumpers, etc. If covered automobile parking is provided, at least 50% of required bicycle parking must be covered.

The amount of required bicycle parking for multiple-family dwellings, (excluding townhomes), commercial, institutional, and industrial uses is equal to 2 spaces + 5% of the required number of automobile parking spaces. Fractions of spaces greater than one-half of a space are rounded up to the nearest whole number of spaces. The Zoning Administrator may waive or reduce the requirement for bicycle parking for uses that are unlikely to generate bicycle trips; such as cemeteries, car washes, kennels, commercial feedlots, junk yards, etc. All new multi-family residential buildings greater than 12 units, commercial, and industrial buildings, and buildings that are remodeled, renovated, added onto, or altered by a building permit with a construction valuation greater than $100,000 are required to comply with the bicycle parking requirements.

Other traffic calming measures the City of Shakopee has implemented include; requiring boulevard trees, pedestrian bump-outs in the Downtown, multiple roundabouts, and two permanent radar signs where the school zone starts.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
PeggySue Imihy (City Staff) | pimihy@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9325
3 star - Action 3:

Prominently identify mobility options: transit; paratransit/Dial-A-Ride; ridesharing/cab services; rental cars; bikes; airports.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2020
Implementation details:
Shakopee’s Chamber of Commerce features links to two local transportation services; one that provides airport shuttle services and the other is responsible for daily school district transportation.

The City’s Public Transportation website includes phone numbers and links to Minnesota Valley Transit Authority, Dial-A-Ride, Metro Area Route Planner, and Metro Transit. Additionally, the website provides emails and a direct line to MVTA’s 24-hour TransitLine as well as children and senior discount rates for the following routes (Shakopee Local Routes 497, 499, Express to Downtown Minneapolis – Routes 490 & 493 for morning and afternoon commutes; Routes 491 & 492 for reverse commutes, Route 495 to Mall of America, Route 498 to Golden Triangle).

The City’s Public Transportation page also includes peak (6AM – 9AM; 3PM – 6:30PM) and non-peak fares for routes serviced, operation hours, free park and rides, and transfer availabilities among each route.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
Minnesota Valley Transit Authority; Shakopee Chamber of Commerce
For more information contact:
PeggySue Imihy (City Staff) | pimihy@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9325

Environmental Management Environmental Management

Community Forests and Soils {BP no.16}

1 star - Action 1:

Certify as a Tree City USA.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2008
Implementation details:
The City of Shakopee became a Tree City USA participant in 2008.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Kyle Sobota (City Staff) | ksobota@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9349
1 star - Action 3:

Budget for and achieve resilient urban canopy/tree planting goals.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2020
Implementation details:
According to the City's records and GIS data, there have been 812 trees planted over the last three years to replace the 244 trees that were removed for a ratio of 3.3 trees planted for every tree removed.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Every time a tree is removed, the City replaces those trees with an additional 3.3 trees on average.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Kirby Templin (City Staff) | ktemplin@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9372
3 star - Action 6:

Build community capacity to protect existing trees by one or more of:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2015
Implementation details:
In 2015, Shakopee's City Council voted to implement an Emerald Ash Borer Management plan for public ash trees within the City. City staff completed an inventory of City managed trees in 2014 and determined that 1 in 3 publicly managed trees are ash as well as that a higher percentage of street trees are ash compared to park trees. 34% of street trees are ash (1500 ash trees); 18% of park trees are ash (500 ash trees) - certain parks have a much higher percent of ash trees; Riverview (100%), Hiawatha (88%); Tahpah (36%); Lions (27%). Council decided on the option to "Treat the best ash trees and replace the remaining" which protects 40% or 750 of the public ash trees as well as removes and replaces the remaining ~ 1100 trees over the next eight years at a rate of 140 trees per year.

Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Kirby Templin (City Staff) | ktemplin@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9372

Stormwater Management {BP no.17}

1 star - Action 2:

Complete the GreenStep Municipal Stormwater Management Assessment.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2020
Implementation details:
Staff completed the Municipal Stormwater Management Assessment on March 9, 2020. Shakopee scored 40% on the Stormwater Assessment Total and 52% on the Climate Adaptation score; this assessment provides a baseline to measure improvements on a year-to-year basis and identifies several key focus areas.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Kirby Templin (City Staff) | ktemplin@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9372

Parks and Trails {BP no.18}

1 star - Action 1:

Make improvements within your city's system of parks, offroad trails and open spaces.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2019
Implementation details:
In August 2019, the City of Shakopee remedied a connectivity break by acquiring a high quality natural area, Sweeney's Marina, to provide the public with access to the river as well as a historic and archaeological site.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
PeggySue Imihy (City Staff) | pimihy@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9325
2 star - Action 2:

Plan and budget for a network of parks, green spaces, water features and trails for areas where new development is planned.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2019
Implementation details:
The City of Shakopee adopted a Parks, Trails, and Recreation Master Plan in 2019 and includes language in the city’s subdivision chapter code, as a prerequisite for subdivision approval, standards for land dedication for parks, playgrounds, and open space purposes (or cash contribution in lieu of such dedications) directly related to density and intensity of each subdivision and development. The City's Park Dedication Policy requires dedications for any commercial development per acre and for residential developments, dedications are determined by the number of units.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Adopting the Parks, Trails, and Recreation Master Plan as well as the appropriate code language and ordinances has enabled the City of Shakopee to plan and budget for a network of parks, green spaces, water features, and trails for areas where new development is planned.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
PeggySue Imihy (City Staff) | pimihy@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9325
2 star - Action 3:

Achieve minimum levels of city green space and maximize the percent within a ten-minute walk of community members.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2019
Implementation details:
The City of Shakopee has a population of 40,893 people with 1,110.5 acres of park land and 766 developed acres providing an average of 27.16 acres per 1,000 population. The total planning area is 18,421 acres, 2,935 of which are open space and 690 are dedicated park lands for a total of 20% of the total city land. The City of Shakopee has a ParkScore profile which determined that 72% of residents live within a 10 minute walk of a park and that 5% of the total land area is for parks.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
PeggySue Imihy (City Staff) | pimihy@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9325
2 star - Action 5:

Create park/city land management standards/practices that maximize at least one of the following:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2019
Implementation details:
The City of Shakopee implements native plants and natural areas utilizing 25-30% native landscaping as part of the landscaping design. Planted areas feature native plantings to support wildlife.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
PeggySue Imihy (City Staff) | pimihy@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9325
1 star - Action 8:

Develop a program to involve community members in hands-on land restoration, invasive species management and stewardship projects.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2016
Implementation details:
The City of Shakopee has an ongoing adopt a park program and encourages volunteer trash cleanups of parks and selected public open space areas during three times of the year; April/May, June/July, and August/September.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
PeggySue Imihy (City Staff) | pimihy@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9325

Efficient Water and Wastewater Systems {BP no.20}

3 star - Action 6:

Implement a wastewater plant efficiency project (co-generation, water reuse) or a program for local private business operations (water conservation, water reuse, business co-location).

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2016
Implementation details:
In 2016, the City of Shakopee, the Metropolitan Council, and CenterPoint Energy developed the Blue Lake Solar Center, a solar farm with a Standard Test Condition of 325 W and a total DC system rating of 1.638 MW, to supplement the energy requirements of the Blue Lake Wastewater Treatment Plant, which treats an average of 27-29 million gallons of wastewater per day. The system will provide approximately 10% of the annual power usage by producing approximately 1,720,000 kWh per year replacing the equivalent of 1.3 million pounds of coal. According to project reporting, the treatment facility and solar farm will offset the use of 1.25 MW and 1.0 MW of fossil fuel and additional power generation infrastructure as well as producing 2,195 MWh in year 1 of clean, renewable energy to the WWTP in Shakopee. The generation of biogas is estimated to offset an average of 1,690 metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions each year, the equivalent to removing 255 passenger vehicles from the road a year or 3 million miles driven by a single automobile. The Metropolitan Council projected and documented energy savings of 80,000 Dth/year is about 80% of the dryer’s pre-project energy consumption and reduces the mass of the solids loading to be dried by 30%. Additionally, the 1,720,000 kWh of solar energy is estimated to replace the release of over 56 pounds of N20 and 90 pounds of Methane. The total amount of energy produced by the 1.25 MW Facility will eliminate an estimated 2,100 metric tons of carbon dioxide, 70 pounds of N20 and 113 pounds of Methane.

The use of the anaerobic digestor produced energy savings equivalent to the annual gas usage of 900 residential customers per year and reduced consumption of purchased natural gas by 80%. The heat recovery system installed on the dryer scrubber system which allows the system to recover 1.85 MMBtu/hr of waste hot water from an odor control system to maintain the digester’s operating temperature of 98 F, eliminating all heating requirements of the digesters whenever the dryer is operating. The biogas will be used to fuel boilers for heating the control building.

Solids removed from the wastewater are dewatered, dried and pelletized for use as an agriculture fertilizer, under a public-private partnership between MCES and the New England Fertilizer Company (NEFCO) and an additional treatment process, anaerobic digestion, produces methane gas that helps power the solids drying equipment. The existing dryer burner equipment was retrofitted to burn either natural gas or the in-house produced biogas with 55-60% of the heat content of natural gas.

Other improvements made at Blue Lake include premium efficiency pump motors, motor drives, and the replacement of air diffusers and additional valves have provided better control over dissolved oxygen and improved oxygen transfer.

The Metropolitan Council projected and documented energy savings of 80,000 Dth/year is about 80% of the dryer’s pre-project energy consumption and reduces the mass of the solids loading to be dried by 30%.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
The system will provide approximately 10% of the annual power usage by producing approximately 1,720,000 kWh per year replacing the equivalent of 1.3 million pounds of coal. According to project reporting, the treatment facility and solar farm will offset the use of 1.25 MW and 1.0 MW of fossil fuel and additional power generation infrastructure as well as producing 2,195 MWh in year 1 of clean, renewable energy to the WWTP in Shakopee. The generation of biogas is estimated to offset an average of 1,690 metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions each year, the equivalent to removing 255 passenger vehicles from the road a year or 3 million miles driven by a single automobile. The Metropolitan Council projected and documented energy savings of 80,000 Dth/year is about 80% of the dryer’s pre-project energy consumption and reduces the mass of the solids loading to be dried by 30%. Additionally, the 1,720,000 kWh of solar energy is estimated to replace the release of over 56 pounds of N20 and 90 pounds of Methane. The total amount of energy produced by the 1.25 MW Facility will eliminate an estimated 2,100 metric tons of carbon dioxide, 70 pounds of N20 and 113 pounds of Methane.

The use of the anaerobic digestor produced energy savings equivalent to the annual gas usage of 900 residential customers per year and reduced consumption of purchased natural gas by 80%. The heat recovery system installed on the dryer scrubber system which allows the system to recover 1.85 MMBtu/hr of waste hot water from an odor control system to maintain the digester’s operating temperature of 98 F, eliminating all heating requirements of the digesters whenever the dryer is operating.

The energy savings from generating 10% of the WWTP's annual energy needs will be passed on to approximately 300,000 residents and businesses that pay the cost of wastewater treatment throughout the metro area.
Descriptive File: view file
Metropolitan Council, Xcel Energy, CenterPoint Energy
For more information contact:
Andrew Boucher (City Staff) | aboucher@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9347

Sustainable Consumption and Waste {BP no.22}

1 star - Action 1:

Improve city operations and procurement to prevent and reuse, recycle and compost waste from all public facilities (including libraries, parks, schools, municipal health care facilities), and minimize use of toxics and generation of hazardous waste.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2020
Implementation details:
Republic Services has provided the container sizes and how often they are serviced at municipal buildings so the City can begin observing and tracking the amounts; separate recycling dumpsters are used at municipal buildings and 90 gallon bins at 10 parks.

The City of Shakopee has transitioned to paperless permitting and plan review including commercial building, residential building, commercial electrical, residential electrical, fire, commercial mechanical, residential mechanical, planning processes, residential plumbing, residential sewer and water, and sign permits. This eliminates the need for paper plans and permits. The City also has recycling containers at municipal buildings and parks.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
Republic Services
For more information contact:
Andrew Boucher (City Staff) | aboucher@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9347
2 star - Action 2:

Address concerns over consumer products and packaging through encouragement/implementation of one or more of:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2020
Implementation details:
The City posted the CoolClimate household-level consumption-based GHG calculator on the city website.

Hydration stations are present at the City Hall, Public Works, the Fire Station, Community Center, and the Ice Arena to reduce the use of disposable water bottles and encourage the refilling of water bottles. The Community Center has four bottle fill stations, the most recent being installed in 2018; City Hall has a bottle fill station; the Ice Arena has three fill stations and combined they have diverted 1,229,716 plastic bottles from the waste stream
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Combined the public fill stations have diverted 1,229,716 plastic bottles from the waste stream.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Andrew Boucher (City Staff) | aboucher@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9347
2 star - Action 3:

Improve profitability, legal compliance and conserve resources through adoption of ordinance language, licensing and resource management contracts.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2020
Implementation details:
Shakopee per (Ord. 893, 10-7-2014) requires the separation of recyclable materials from garbage. The zoning code (151.108 - #8) has specific space and licensed refuse collector requirements for garbage and recycling in multi-unit residential and commercial buildings; bulky items and yard waste are accepted for an additional charge either for one-time pickups or annual subscription. The Scott County Household Hazardous Waste Facilities also accepts bulk items and the SMSC Organics Recycling Facility accepts yard waste and other organics. The City provides solid waste reduction, reuse, and recycling information and instructions from Republic Services as well as the MPCA’s recycling information on its garbage and recycling page. Recycling is required per contract to be taken to Dem-Con Material Recovery.

Republic Services is the contracted City hauler for residential properties and has provided waste data including recycling totals per ton, recycling breakdowns per material (as a percentage of total waste and in tons per material), and waste collection of trash/recycling/yard waste in tons going back to 2017. In 2018, there was a slight reduction in recycling rates for 8 out of the 12 months and an overall reduction in compared to the year before; however, in 2019, there are 7 out of the 12 months where the recycling rates increase contributing to the overall increase of 5.38% from 2017. These trends are reflected in the decrease of the recycling breakdown in 2018 and increases in 2019. Republic Services also offers yard waste subscriptions and bulky item pickup upon request. The City employs a planner responsible for coordinating sustainability practices and policies as well as parks and recreation staff that manage day-to-day operation of recycling in public facilities.

Recycling containers are in public buildings, parks, and athletic facilities; multi-unit recycling containers are required and information is posted by haulers in multi-unit residential dwellings.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
The City of Shakopee has a participation rate of 96% in the recycling program.

In 2018, Shakopee collected 2,649.63 tons of recycling and 1,580.12 of yard waste in tons; in 2019, the amount of recyclable materials collected increased by 150.511 tons to 2,800.14 tons and yard waste collected increased by 557.71 tons to 2,137.83 which came out to a 5.38% and 26.09%, respectively, increase from the previous year.
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Andrew Boucher (City Staff) | aboucher@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9347
1 star - Action 4:

Publicize, promote and use the varied businesses/services collecting and marketing used, repaired and rental consumer goods, especially electronics, in the city/county.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2020
Implementation details:
The City posted the CoolClimate household-level consumption-based GHG calculator on the city website.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Andrew Boucher (City Staff) | aboucher@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9347
1 star - Action 5:

Arrange for a residential and/or business/institutional source-separated organics collection/management program.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2020
Implementation details:
The City of Shakopee offers elective residential yard waste collection.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Andrew Boucher (City Staff) | aboucher@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9347
1 star - Action 6:

Improve recycling services and expand to multi-unit housing and commercial businesses.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2020
Implementation details:
Shakopee per (Ord. 893, 10-7-2014) requires the separation of recyclable materials from garbage. The zoning code (151.108 - #8) has specific space and licensed refuse collector requirements for garbage and recycling in multi-unit residential and commercial buildings; bulky items and yard waste are accepted for an additional charge either for one-time pickups or annual subscription. The Scott County Household Hazardous Waste Facilities also accepts bulk items and the SMSC Organics Recycling Facility accepts yard waste and other organics. The City provides solid waste reduction, reuse, and recycling information and instructions from Republic Services as well as the MPCA’s recycling information on its garbage and recycling page. Recycling is required per contract to be taken to Dem-Con Material Recovery.

The City reports its recycling rate, under its Garbage and Recycling page, based upon the data provided by Republic Services. Republic Services is the contracted City hauler for residential properties and has provided waste data including recycling totals per ton, recycling breakdowns per material (as a percentage of total waste and in tons per material), and waste collection of trash/recycling/yard waste in tons going back to 2017. In 2018, there was a slight reduction in recycling rates for 8 out of the 12 months and an overall reduction in compared to the year before; however, in 2019, there are 7 out of the 12 months where the recycling rates increase contributing to the overall increase of 5.38% from 2017. These trends are reflected in the decrease of the recycling breakdown in 2018 and increases in 2019. Republic Services also offers yard waste subscriptions and bulky item pickup upon request. The City employs a planner responsible for coordinating sustainability practices and policies as well as parks and recreation staff that manage day-to-day operation of recycling in public facilities.

Recycling containers are in public buildings, parks, and athletic facilities; multi-unit recycling containers are required as part of the building inspection process and information is posted by haulers in multi-unit residential dwellings.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
The City of Shakopee has a participation rate of 96% in the recycling program.

In 2018, Shakopee collected 2,649.63 tons of recycling and 1,580.12 of yard waste in tons; in 2019, the amount of recyclable materials collected increased by 150.511 tons to 2,800.14 tons and yard waste collected increased by 557.71 tons to 2,137.83 which came out to a 5.38% and 26.09%, respectively, increase from the previous year.
Descriptive File: view file
Republic Services
For more information contact:
Andrew Boucher (City Staff) | aboucher@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9347
3 star - Action 7:

Improve/organize residential trash, recycling and organics collection by private and/or public operations and offer significant volume-based pricing on residential garbage and/or incentives for recycling.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2020
Implementation details:
The City of Shakopee has established and organized a collection schedule for refuse once a week and recycling every other week following a collection route map; Republic Services provided quarterly waste/recyclables tonnage reports as a condition of licensing; all single-family dwellings, duplexes, triplexes, and other residential units are required to have refuse service from Republic Services.

Republic Services provides residential weekly trash collection and biweekly recycling including yard waste if so desired.

The City of Shakopee contracts with one hauler for residential collections; the City has found a 96% recycling participation rate.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
The City has a 96% recycling participation rate.
Descriptive File:
Republic Services
For more information contact:
Andrew Boucher (City Staff) | aboucher@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9347

Local Air Quality {BP no.23}

1 star - Action 2:

Regulate outdoor wood burning, using ordinance language, performance standards and bans as appropriate, for at least one of the following:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2001
Implementation details:
The City of Shakopee has adopted the state regulations, M.S. §§ 88.16 through 88.171, on open burning and included additional regulations.

Shakopee City Code 130.06A establishes that it is unlawful for any person to burn or permit burning of any grass, weeds, leaves, rubbish, or other substances upon premises owned or occupied by that person. The following open burning is excepted from the regulation of this section; with respect to divisions (C3-9) and an appropriate permit are first obtained.

Open fires used solely for preparation of food;

Fires set by the City Fire Prevention Bureau and/or City Fire Department personnel or their authorized representatives for instruction and training use of fire protection equipment;

Fires set for the instruction and training of public and industrial fire fighting personnel;

Fires set for the elimination of fire hazards which cannot be abated by any other practical means;

Fires set for the clearing of and parcels greater than 20 acres in size;

Running fires on agricultural croplands greater than 5 acres in size;

Running fires conducted by state or federal agencies;

Running fires to cultivate or replace native plant landscapes; given the overall parcel size is greater than 2 acres in size and the fire area is greater than 1/2 acre in size. The property owner and/or occupant shall contract with a company specializing in native plant landscape management;

Recreational fires; provided, that all of the following criteria are met. For the purpose of this division (C)(9) the following terms shall apply:

RECREATIONAL FIRE.

Burning of materials other than rubbish for pleasure, religious, ceremonial, cooking, or similar purposes where the fuel being burned is not contained in an incinerator, outdoor fireplace, barbecue grill, or barbecue pit and where the total fuel area is 3 feet or less in diameter and 3 feet or less in height;

RECREATIONAL FIRES shall not be conducted within 25 feet of a single- or multi-family residential structure or commercial structure unless contained in an outdoor fireplace constructed of non-combustible materials containing a base supported by a minimum of 3 legs, a wire mesh screen on all sides, and a lid. Conditions which could cause a fire to spread to within 25 feet of a structure must be eliminated prior to ignition;

An outdoor fireplace as defined above shall not be used within 15 feet of a single- or multi-family structure or commercial structure;

Buckets, shovels, garden hoses, or a fire extinguisher with a minimum 4-A rating shall be readily available for use at RECREATIONAL FIRES;

RECREATIONAL FIRES shall be constantly attended by a person knowledgeable in the use of fire extinguishing equipment. An attendant shall supervise a RECREATIONAL FIRE until such fire has been extinguished;

Any member of the City Fire Prevention Bureau, Officer of the City Fire Department, State DNR, City Police Department, or County Sheriff Department is authorized to require that RECREATIONAL FIRES be immediately discontinued if such fires are determined to constitute a hazardous or nuisance condition;

RECREATIONAL FIRES are not allowed if a total burning ban is in effect;

Maximum wind speed including gusts must not exceed 15 mph; and

The prevailing winds must be away from occupied structures.


RUBBISH. Waste material including, but not limited to, garbage, waste paper, leaves, grass, yard and garden waste, debris from construction or demolition, hazardous materials, oils, rubber, plastic, chemically treated materials, or other materials which produce excessive or noxious smoke.

Bonfires, providing that all the following criteria are met. For the purpose of this division (C)(10) the following terms shall apply:


BONFIRE. The burning of materials other than rubbish for pleasure, religious, ceremonial, cooking, or similar purposes where the fuel being burned is not contained in an incinerator, outdoor fireplace, barbecue grill, or barbecue pit and where the total fuel area is greater than 3 feet in diameter and greater than 3 feet in height.

Permits will only be issued for bonfires at community involvement functions, spiritual functions, and special event functions approved by the City Fire Prevention Bureau and the City Fire Department.

The bonfire shall not be conducted within 250 feet of a single- or multi-family residential structure or any commercial structure. Conditions which could cause a fire to spread, shall be eliminated prior to ignition.

The fuel area shall be contained to an area not to exceed 15 feet in diameter.

The City Fire Department personnel and apparatus shall be on stand-by at the bonfire site until such time that the fire is, in their judgment, contained.

Upon request of the City Fire Prevention Bureau, City Fire Department, or City Police Department, the permit holder shall provide an attendant to supervise the bonfire until such fire has been extinguished.

The bonfire shall be immediately discontinued if such fire constitutes a hazardous or nuisance condition.

Bonfires will not be allowed if a total burning ban is in effect.

RUBBISH. Waste material including, but not limited to, garbage, waste paper, leaves, grass, yard and garden waste, debris from construction or demolition, hazardous materials, oils, rubber, plastic, chemically treated materials, or other materials which produce excessive or noxious smoke.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Andrew Boucher (City Staff) | aboucher@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9347

Resilient Economic & Community Development Resilient Economic and Community Development

Renewable Energy {BP no.26}

1 star - Action 2:

Promote resident/business purchases and/or generation of clean energy by:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2020
Implementation details:
Posted a link to the University of Minnesota's Solar Suitability App on the City's Landscaping and Property Maintenance website.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
University of Minnesota
For more information contact:
Andrew Boucher (City Staff) | aboucher@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9347
1 star - Action 5:

Install a public sector/municipally-owned renewable energy technology, such as solar electric (PV), wind, biomass, solar hot water/air, or micro-hydro.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2016
Implementation details:
In 2016, the City of Shakopee, the Metropolitan Council, and CenterPoint Energy developed the Blue Lake Solar Center, a solar farm with a Standard Test Condition of 325 W and a total DC system rating of 1.638 MW, to supplement the energy requirements of the Blue Lake Wastewater Treatment Plant, which treats an average of 27-29 million gallons of wastewater per day. The system will provide approximately 10% of the annual power usage by producing approximately 1,720,000 kWh per year replacing the equivalent of 1.3 million pounds of coal. According to project reporting, the treatment facility and solar farm will offset the use of 1.25 MW and 1.0 MW of fossil fuel and additional power generation infrastructure as well as producing 2,195 MWh in year 1 of clean, renewable energy to the WWTP in Shakopee. The generation of biogas is estimated to offset an average of 1,690 metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions each year, the equivalent to removing 255 passenger vehicles from the road a year or 3 million miles driven by a single automobile. The Metropolitan Council projected and documented energy savings of 80,000 Dth/year is about 80% of the dryer’s pre-project energy consumption and reduces the mass of the solids loading to be dried by 30%. Additionally, the 1,720,000 kWh of solar energy is estimated to replace the release of over 56 pounds of N20 and 90 pounds of Methane. The total amount of energy produced by the 1.25 MW Facility will eliminate an estimated 2,100 metric tons of carbon dioxide, 70 pounds of N20 and 113 pounds of Methane.

The use of the anaerobic digestor produced energy savings equivalent to the annual gas usage of 900 residential customers per year and reduced consumption of purchased natural gas by 80%. The heat recovery system installed on the dryer scrubber system which allows the system to recover 1.85 MMBtu/hr of waste hot water from an odor control system to maintain the digester’s operating temperature of 98 F, eliminating all heating requirements of the digesters whenever the dryer is operating. The biogas will be used to fuel boilers for heating the control building.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
The system will provide approximately 10% of the annual power usage by producing approximately 1,720,000 kWh per year replacing the equivalent of 1.3 million pounds of coal. According to project reporting, the treatment facility and solar farm will offset the use of 1.25 MW and 1.0 MW of fossil fuel and additional power generation infrastructure as well as producing 2,195 MWh in year 1 of clean, renewable energy to the WWTP in Shakopee. The generation of biogas is estimated to offset an average of 1,690 metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions each year, the equivalent to removing 255 passenger vehicles from the road a year or 3 million miles driven by a single automobile. The Metropolitan Council projected and documented energy savings of 80,000 Dth/year is about 80% of the dryer’s pre-project energy consumption and reduces the mass of the solids loading to be dried by 30%. Additionally, the 1,720,000 kWh of solar energy is estimated to replace the release of over 56 pounds of N20 and 90 pounds of Methane. The total amount of energy produced by the 1.25 MW Facility will eliminate an estimated 2,100 metric tons of carbon dioxide, 70 pounds of N20 and 113 pounds of Methane.

The use of the anaerobic digestor produced energy savings equivalent to the annual gas usage of 900 residential customers per year and reduced consumption of purchased natural gas by 80%. The heat recovery system installed on the dryer scrubber system which allows the system to recover 1.85 MMBtu/hr of waste hot water from an odor control system to maintain the digester’s operating temperature of 98 F, eliminating all heating requirements of the digesters whenever the dryer is operating.

The energy savings from generating 10% of the WWTP's annual energy needs will be passed on to approximately 300,000 residents and businesses that pay the cost of wastewater treatment throughout the metro area.
Descriptive File: view file
Metropolitan Council, Xcel Energy, CenterPoint Energy,
For more information contact:
Andrew Boucher (City Staff) | aboucher@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9347
1 star - Action 7:

Become a solar-ready community,  including adopting ordinance/zoning language and an expedited permit process for residents and businesses to install solar energy systems.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2019
Implementation details:
In all of the City's residential, business, and industrial districts solar equipment is defined as an accessory use that is allowed outright.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
PeggySue Imihy (City Staff) | pimihy@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9325

Local Food {BP no.27}

2 star - Action 1:

Incorporate working landscapes - agriculture and forestry - into the city by adopting an ordinance for one or more of the following:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2020
Implementation details:
The City of Shakopee established an Agricultural Preservation Zone (AG) to preserve and promote agriculture in the unsewered areas of the city which are suitable for such use, to prevent scattered and leap-frog non-farm growth, and to prevent premature expenditures for such public services as roads, sewer, water, and police and fire protection. The City is also in the process of establishing a Parks Zoning District.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
The City prevented the scattered and leap-frog non-farm growth, and prevented premature expenditures for such public services as roads, sewer, water, and police and fire protection. The City is also in the process of establishing a Parks Zoning District.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Andrew Boucher (City Staff) | aboucher@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9347
2 star - Action 2:

Facilitate creation of home/community gardens, chicken & bee keeping, and incorporation of food growing areas/access in multifamily residential developments.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2019
Implementation details:
The City of Shakopee has removed restrictions prohibiting food gardening/raising of chickens/and beekeeping in all zoning districts and allow them by right.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
The City has 9 registered bee colonies and allows the keeping of hens/bees in every zone by right.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Andrew Boucher (City Staff) | aboucher@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9347
3 star - Action 3:

Create, assist with and promote local food production/distribution within the city:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2020
Implementation details:
The City of Shakopee promotes a seasonal Farmer's Market that takes place in a public parking lot that the City owns and maintains; out of the City's 14,174 total housing units, there are 5,639 houses or 40% of the total housing stock within a 1 mile distance of the farmer's market.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
40% of total housing stock is within a 1 mile distance of the Farmer's Market.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Andrew Boucher (City Staff) | aboucher@shakopeemn.gov | 952-233-9347