City Detail

Background Information

City of Burnsville
County: Dakota
Population: 60306
GreenStep City category: A
Full-time equivalent city staff (approx.): 220
Participating township, county, school:

GreenStep Coordinator

Sue Bast
City Staff
952-895-4524
City web page relating to sustainability/GreenStep activities:
GreenStep City resolution: Click here to view the file.
GreenStep City status and date: STEP 5 ( )

City Assessment Files and City Performance Metrics

City councils pass a resolution to join the GreenStep program and are recognized at Step 1. Step 2 and Step 3 recognition levels reflect completed city actions, reported and rated below with stars (1 star = good, 2 stars = better, 3 stars = best). The Assessment File below summarizes completed city actions in a short Word file. Step 4 recognition is awarded to cities who report a minimum number of core metrics for the previous calendar year. These metrics aim to show the aggregate, quantitative results of taking multiple GreenStep actions. Step 5 cities show improvement in the Step 4 metrics. See yearly data for Steps 4&5. Additional city data can be found by reviewing information on B3 Benchmarking and Regional Indicators Initiative.

Assessment File

Best Practice Actions Underway and Completed

Completed actions are denoted by stars.

Total completed actions: 89
1 star actions: 36
2 star actions: 27
3 star actions: 19

Buildings and Lighting Buildings and Lighting

Efficient Existing Public Buildings {BP no.1}

2 star - Action 1:

Enter building information into the Minnesota B3 Benchmarking database and routinely enter monthly energy, water use data for all city-owned buildings.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Monthly Energy consumption at city building's is being monitored via the B3 database. The City worked with a GreenCorp Volunteer to enter historic utility data into the B3 system. Gary Novotny, the City Maintenance Supervisor, will continue using the B3 system to manage and track energy usage at City facilities.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:

Outcome measures/metrics: After having validated the data and correcting errors that existed the utility information reported in B3 is current for city buildings. Within the next month, the City will begin the process of analying B3 data to identify current energy saving opportunities with the help of a MN GreenCorp member, and GreenStep City building best practice advisors.
Descriptive File: view file
MN GreenCorps, MN GreenStep Cities
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
3 star - Action 2:

Make no/low cost indoor lighting and operational changes in city-owned/school buildings to reduce energy costs.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
In, 2010, Dakota Electric audited the City of Burnsville's city-owned buildings. Based on the recommendations, Fire Station 1 made several low/no-cost O&M changes:
-Weather stripped garage doors and exterior doors
-Converted all fluorescent lamps to T8 25W
-Installed occupancy controls for lighting in 4 areas of the station
-Installed compact fluorescent lights in certain areas of the station
-All of the bay lighting fixtures were replaced with high bay fluorescent fixtures

These changes began in 2010, and were completed by 2011.

Burnsville Performing Art Center was constructed in 2009. Energy efficiency was considered in the building envelope, the HVAC System, the lighting, etc. Due to the highly efficient nature of the building, the Dakota Electric Audit in 2010 did not have numerous recommendations for the building. However, the audit did reveal that the HVAC System was not being utilized as efficiently as it could be. Therefore, the HVAC system was fine tuned in the middle of 2010, and energy savings resulted.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Fire Station 1's energy consumption reduced 13.76% post low cost O&M changes. Please note, retro commissioning changes were made at Fire Station 1 during the same time period, that will be reported under Action 3. Due to this, it is difficult to know the percentage change of solely the low/no cost changes.

Burnsville Performing Arts Center's energy consumption reduced 15.4% post fine-tuning its HVAC system.
Descriptive File: view file
Dakota Electric
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
3 star - Action 3:

Invest in larger energy efficiency projects through performance contracting or other funding or through smaller retro-commissioning/retrofit projects in city-owned/school buildings.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Fire Station 1:
All of the following changes were started in 2010 and completed by October of 2011. Some of the changes were the result of recommendations from an audit performed by Dakota Electric. Some changes, like the replaced furnace, were scheduled replacements. Most HVAC systems that will be replaced in Burnsville in the future will all be replaced with energy efficient models if funding allows.
-Exhaust ventilation controls were installed
-Programmable thermostats were installed
-Outdoor ventilation controls were installed
-All existing vents are now tied into the furnaces
-The furnace was replaced with a high efficiency condensing furnace
-Bay heaters were replaced with infrared heating
-Outdoor lighting fixtures began converting to LED fixtures.
Dakota Electric provided a $3,000 rebate for the air source heat pumps. CenterPoint Energy provided funding for the high efficiency furnaces.



Burnsville City Hall:
-In 2007 the chiller was replaced with a variable drive.
-In 2010, a TPL Roof with R34 insulation was installed
-Installed an Energy Management System
-Converted all the pneumatic VAV boxes to electronic or digital control
-Hot and cold water valves have been replaced with digital and electronic controls instead of air
-A dozen outdoor fixturs have been replaced with LED lights.
-In 2011, Maintenance Staff began converting interior lobby lights, property lights and several other areas to LED (26 LED fixtures in total).
-In the process of signing a contract to install a high efficiency condensing boiler in the building. This will be completed in 2012.

The following items will be completed in the next couple of years:
-Circulating pumps will be replaced with variable frequency drives
-Humidifiers will be replaced with more energy efficient models
-All HVAC equipment will will be tied into the energy management system.

In 2012, Burnsville created an Energy Efficiency Fund. The fund is overseen by Maintenance Supervisor Gary Novotny. This fund incentives purchasing energy efficient products by matching rebates and by selectively paying for energy efficient products that have longer paybacks, such as LED lighting. Currently the fund is being used to pay for outdoor LED lighting fixtures. The results of the program will be reported in Burnsville's Annual Report for it's Sustainability Plan. In addition, going forward, Gary Novotny and Sue Bast will report progress on the GreenStep Cities Site.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Fire Station 1 energy consumption reduced 13.76% post retrofitting.
City Hall energy consumption reduced 15.65% post retrofitting.
Burnsville created its Energy Efficiency Fund in 2012. The results of the program will be reported in Burnsville's Annual Report for it's Sustainability Plan. In addition, going forward, Gary Novotny and Sue Bast will report progress on the GreenStep Cities Site.
Descriptive File: view file
Dakota Electric and CenterPoint Energy
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
3 star - Action 4:

Implement information technology efforts and city employee engagement to reduce plug loads, building energy use and workflow efficiency.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Burnsville power management settings are controlled through a Group Policy Object, which controls what users can and cannnot do on a computer system. City staff users cannot manipulate power management settings. Computers enter sleep mode after 15 minutes. Multi-function Devices enter sleep mode after 30 minutes.

Burnsville's Sustainability Team sends out monthly sustainability tips to city employees. The city installed light switch reminders on all light switch covers that read "Last to Ditch, Flip the Switch". The City performed a walk-through audit in 2012 before the behavioral campaign began, (audit numbers are attached a supporting document). A follow-up audit will be performed in the future.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
1 star - Action 7:

Install for one or more city-owned/school buildings one of the following efficiency measures:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
A closed loop geothermal system was installed in the Burnsville Ice Center in 2010. This rennovation made the ice center one of the most efficient and sustainable ice arena nationwide. When it came time to replace the aging mechanical and ice systems at the 38-year old Ice Center, improving efficiency by implementing sustainable design practices, as outlined in the Citys 2008 Sustainability Guide Plan, was a top priority  11 of the 14 Best Practices Areas (BPAs) identified in the guide were incorporated in the project. The project was funded by an Energy and Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant, a Dakota Electric Rebate, as well as city funds.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
The Ice Center emits 20% less carbon, and uses 80% less natural gas annualy than pre-geothermal installation. The annual operating costs have been reduced by 43%. The actual coefficient of performance for the system has not been determined yet, however, it is a closed system. Over the next several years the City will be monitoring the system closely to determine its performance and to calculate the efficiency of the system.
Descriptive File:

Efficient Existing Private Buildings {BP no.2}

3 star - Action 2:

Integrate green building and EV charging best practices information and assistance into the building permit process.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
City staff mentions green building resources informally to applicants. The City also let applicants know that they have two green building guides available on our website, as this is more sustainable then handing out information sheets.

Some applications have specific green suggestions tied to their permit, if appropriate.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
1 star - Action 5:

Conserve/protect drinking/groundwater resources by creating a water-wise landscaping ordinance/guidance, WaterSense purchasing program, or guidance on rainwater harvesting and home water softener use.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Bursville has a water conservation rate structure. The rates are shown in the attached PDF. The rates apply to residential uses, commercial uses, and include rates for irrigation and off-peak snow making.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524

Efficient Outdoor Lighting and Signals {BP no.4}

1 star - Action 1:

Require energy efficient, Dark-Sky compliant new or replacement outdoor lighting fixtures on city-owned/private buildings and facilities.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
New or replaced outdoor lighting fixtures are all energy efficient, Dark-Sky compliant fixtures. Additionally, almost all new outdoor lighting fixtures are LED. This is overseen by the City of Burnsville's Maintenance Supervisor as a standard, not a policy.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
3 star - Action 4:

Coordinate traffic signals and/or optimize signal timing so as minimize car idling at intersections yet maintain safe and publicly acceptable vehicle speeds.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
" There are 67 signals in the city:
o 22 owned by the City
o 30 owned by the County
o 16 owned by the State

Signals synchronized owned by the City are along Nicollet Avenue and Burnsville Parkway:
o Nic. \Burns. Pkwy.
o Nic.\ Travelers Trail
o Nic.\126th Street
o Nic.\130th Street
o Nic.\134th Street
o Burns. Pkwy. \Harriet Ave.
o Burns. Pkwy.\Pleasant Ave.
o Burns. Pkwy.\Travelers Trail

The City use to have the signals along Southcross Drive synchronized as well but over the last five years we removed them since there wasnt enough traffic on the roadway and the side roads were waiting too long.

Burnsville has worked with Mn/DOT on synchronizing the signals along T.H. 13/ Nicollet Avenue and Burnsville Parkway /35W.

Dakota County has done their own synchronizing on CSAH 42. Burnsville gives input to the County on any issues we have with delay of traffic flow, and works with the County during holidays to make sure traffic flow is changed during that time. The County is installing fiber optic to help with synchronizing their signals on CSAH 42 and the City is helping in financing and giving input. The City has requested the County consider installing a CMAQ grant for software analysis packages which would quickly generates optimum timing plans to minimize delay and to model the traffic flow.

Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
2 star - Action 5:

Use LED/solar-powered lighting for a flashing sign or in a street, parking lot or park project.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of Burnsville has installed two solar signs for pedestrian crossing. The first sign is located in downtown, on Nicollet Ave, and the second pedestrian crossing solar sign is located near Fairview Ridges Hospital. The city also installed a solar powered sign at its fire station. This sign flashes when vehicles are leaving the fire station.

The City installed LED lighting for its Performing Arts Center parking lot.

Burnsville's public works is in the process of determining how they can use LED lights in the streets and parking lots cost effectively.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
2 star - Action 8:

Replace the city's existing traffic signals with LEDs.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of Burnsville has replaced more than 2/3 of existing traffic signals with LED lighting.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524

Building Redevelopment {BP no.5}

3 star - Action 5:

Adopt development/design standards and programs that facilitate infill, redevelopment, and adaptable buildings.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
In 1999, Burnsville adopted development and design standards for it's downtown core, known as the Heart of the City district (HOC).

The HOC Design Standards facilitate the evolution of strip/large format commercial areas into more liveable/walkable neighborhoods. A large KMart Store used to be located on southwest of Highway 13 and Nicollet Avenue. That area site was redeveloped with mixed use commercial and high density residential, following the HOC Design Standards.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524

Land Use Land Use

Comprehensive, Climate and Energy Plans {BP no.6}

2 star - Action 1:

Adopt a comprehensive plan or (for Category B & C cities) adopt a future land use plan that was adopted by the county or a regional entity.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
On June 22, 2010, the 2030 Comprehensive Plan Update was adopted that includes sustainability goals. To see the goals, reference Chapter 1 of the Comprehensive Plan, p 14-15; and Chapter II, p. 59-61. In 2010, Burnsville revised solar and wind energy standards of zoning ordinance. In 2009, the City's Sustainability Plan was adopted; public participation was part of the Governance review process.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
3 star - Action 2:

Demonstrate that regulatory ordinances comply with the comprehensive plan including but not limited to having the zoning ordinance explicitly reference the comprehensive plan as the foundational document for decision making.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of Burnsville utilizes it's Comprehensive Plan 2030 as the guiding document for it's zoning code, as shown in Chapter 2 of the Zoning Ordinance. In addition, the Comprehensive Plan is referenced in all land use and development ordinances and regulations; Department of Natural Resources Shoreland Management Ordinance, Federal Emergency Management Agency Floodplain Ordinance, and the subdivision ordinance. Ordinances are introduced with a "Purposes" section that cite the Comprehensive Plan, as seen in the Chapter 2 of the Zoning Ordinance.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Zoning Ordinance: http://www.sterlingcodifiers.com/codebook/index.php?book_id=468, in Title 10, Chapter 2.

Purpose section: Zoning Ordinance Title 10, Ch. 2

DNR Shoreland Management Ordinance: Zoning Ordinance Title 10, Ch. 8

Floodplain Ordinance: Zoning Ordinance Title 10, Ch. 10

Subdivision Ordinance: Uploaded PDF

Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
3 star - Action 3:

Include requirements in comprehensive and/or other plans for intergovernmental coordination addressing regional land use and watershed / wellhead impacts, infrastructure, transportation, economic development and city/regional services.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Burnsville includes plan requirements on coordinated action with surrounding or overlapping jurisdiction for land use, watershed impacts, transportation, economic development, housing, and health. Land Use plan changes are reviewed and commented upon by all abutting jurisdictions (Chapter 1. p. 10-12). To address watershed impacts, Burnsville has a Wetland Protection and Management Plan(Appendix J). Burnsville coordinates transit services with MVTA to address transportation issues (appendix N). Economic Development is addressed through collaboration with MN Workforce Center (Ch. II, p. 2-5). Burnsville signed the Livable Communities Agreement with the Metropolitan Council in 2011 to address housing issues(Ch. IV p.2, goal #3). Burnsville has a Healthy Cities Initiative to address health issues (Ch. V, p.17-19).


Burnsville has entered into agreement with surrounding communities to address the following issues: housing, police, and transportation. The City has adopted resolutions with Dakota CDA to provide affordable housing options. The City school districts utilize Blue in the School program where police provide safety education programs targeted at youth and high risk populations. The City is part of the UPA Agreement with MnDOT to provide I-35W BRT & MnPass lanes through Burnsville.

In order to avoid duplication and improve performance, Burnsville, Dakota County & MnDOT have a join agreement for Highway 13/CSAH 5 interchange. Roadway, signage, signalization, lighting, etc. are in place and programmed as part of each agency's CIP.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
3 star - Action 4:

Include ecological provisions in the comprehensive plan that explicitly aim to minimize open space fragmentation and/or establish a growth area with expansion criteria.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Burnsville has conducted an NRI and the results are incorporated in the Natural Environment Plan of the Comprehensive Plan (Ch. VI). The results of the NRI are prioritized through an NRA. Natural resource protection areas have been identified and strategies for their long-term protection have been developed (Ch. VI, Section 4 Natural Resources Management Plan).
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
2 star - Action 5:

Adopt climate mitigation and/or energy independence goals and objectives in the comprehensive plan or in a separate policy document, and include transportation recommendations such as becoming an EV-ready city.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
As measured from the 2009 Burnsville City Operations emissions level of 23,487 tonnes, the City of Burnsville will reduce GHG emissions associated with City operations to below 2009 levels by the end of 2011. Recognizing Burnsville's Next Generation Act obligations, the City will continue to reduce emissions from the baseline by an average annual reduction of 4% (measured over the span of a decade), after indexing emissions to growth in number of City employees relative to the rest of the state. The City has several implementation strategies directly linked to this goal, as seen in the attached Sustainability Plan starting on p.3.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524

Resilient City Growth {BP no.7}

2 star - Action 1:

Limit barriers to higher density housing by including in the city zoning ordinance and zoning map:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Burnsville limits barriers to higher density housing in it's zoning ordinance and zoning map through the following:

R3A Zoning District allows single family at 4 - 8.7 units per acre and R3C allows multi-family up to 21.78 upa

Added a MIX Zoning District to zoning ordinance in 2011 allows density of 15 - 21.78 units per acre & in 1999 added HOC District that allows residential density 21.78 - 56.92 upa.

Added a MIX Zoning District to zoning ordinance in 2011 allows density of 15 - 21.78 units per acre & in 1999 added HOC District that allows residential density 21.78 - 56.92 upa
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
The zoning districts are part of the zoning ordinance. The best way to view the zoning ordinance is on line at www.burnsville.org then click on City Code. The entire zoning ordinance is Title 10. Each specific zoning district has its own chapter within the zoning ordinance.

Please note that we are still in the process of implementing our comprehensive plan updates and that on the zoning map, the areas that show up as R3C  Regional Center Residential will be changed to MIX zoning in a couple of months. Also, there is an existing MIX district at Valley Ridge where the Dakota CDA/Presbyterian Homes Valley Ridge assisted care/memory care and independent living mixed use project is under construction. (The site is located SW of the intersection of CSAH 5 and Burnsville Parkway on land that was formerly Valley Ridge Shopping Center.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
1 star - Action 2:

Achieve higher density housing through at least two of the following strategies:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Burnsville allows a flexible lot size/frontage for Planned Unit Developments District.

Density bonus & FAR bonuses are allowed for Planned Unit Developments, MIX and HOC. Under the General Provisions, development on residential lots that meet 70% of the lot sized standard in the district is allowed. Development is also allowed on all lots of record in commercial/industrial districts.

A regulatory standard limits low-density development, as showing in the MIX Zoning Distric, and the HOC Zoning District.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
The zoning districts are part of the zoning ordinance. The best way to view the zoning ordinance is on line at www.burnsville.org then click on City Code. The entire zoning ordinance is Title 10. Each specific zoning district has its own chapter within the zoning ordinance.

Please note that we are still in the process of implementing our comprehensive plan updates and that on the zoning map, the areas that show up as R3C  Regional Center Residential will be changed to MIX zoning in a couple of months. Also, there is an existing MIX district at Valley Ridge where the Dakota CDA/Presbyterian Homes Valley Ridge assisted care/memory care and independent living mixed use project is under construction. (The site is located SW of the intersection of CSAH 5 and Burnsville Parkway on land that was formerly Valley Ridge Shopping Center.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
1 star - Action 3:

Achieve higher intensity commercial/industrial land uses through at least one of the following strategies:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Zero-lot-line setbacks are allowed in the Planned Unit Development District, and all commercial and industrial districts.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
3 star - Action 4:

Provide incentives for infill projects, or for life-cycle housing at or near job or retail centers, or for achieving an average net residential density of seven units per acre.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Burnsville utilizes tax-increment financing and tax abatement for projects that include but are not limited to creation or retention of jobs, elimination of blight, neighborhood revitalization and other development and redevelopment goals established by the city (Council Policy 1.136).

All land use clearance projects needing city council approval are reviewed in 60 days. Burnsville offers a building permit fee rebate according to the Single Family Permit Rebate (Counicl Policy 2.095), which offers an incentive program for single family, duplex, and townhome property owners that make substantial investment into their homes.

Burnsville has a Housing Improvement Area Policy as a life-cycle housing tool. It established the city's position to use Housing Improvement Area financing for private housing improvements (Council Policy 5.306).
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524

Mixed Uses {BP no.8}

3 star - Action 2:

Locate or lease a school, city building or other government facility that has at least two of these attributes:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The Burnsville Performing Art Center is adjacent to the Nicollet Commons Park where walking and biking is accessible for staff. Also, the center is located on the busy thoroughfare Nicollet Avenue where regular transit service is available.

The Burnsville Performing Arts Center has a joint parking lot with the Nicollet Commons Park, as well as other businesses on the block. This parking lot has significantly less parking than standards would require because it is located next to several transit lines.

Burnsville Highschool and Burnsville Senior Campus both have a private bus company available to take students to and from school at no cost to students. If students miss this bus, the highschool has tokens, free MN Transit bus passes, the students can use to ride public transit at no cost.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
3 star - Action 3:

Modify a planned unit development ordinance to emphasize mixed use development, to limit residential PUDs to areas adjacent to commercial development, and/or to add sustainability features.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Burnsville allows for mixed development in its Public Utility District, Heart of the City District, MIX district and R3c District. The MIX district requires mixed uses.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
3 star - Action 5:

Have a downtown zoning district that allows residential and compatible commercial development.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Burnsville's downtown district, Heart of the City (HOC), predates the Model Ordinances for Sustainable Development. HOC is a downtown overlay district. HOC, Public Utilities District, and MIX all allow mixed use of office, retail, educational, civic, and residential units within the same building.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
At the Burnsville website, www.burnsville.org, click on City Code, zoning information is found in Title 10.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
2 star - Action 6:

Incorporate form-based zoning approaches into the zoning code, in those areas where a diverse mix of uses is desired.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Burnsville's Heart of the City District (it's downtown core), uses form-based codes. The HOC District specifies build-to-lines vs. setbacks (see attached PDF). The HOC District standard for building width to height is 25'height to 65' frontage.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
3 star - Action 7:

Create incentives for vertical mixed-use development in appropriate locations (downtown, commercial districts near colleges or universities, historic commercial districts).

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
ONE STAR:
Burnsvilles comprehensive plan promotes mixed use in many different sections of the plan. The Future Land Use Planning (Chapter 2 of Comprehensive Plan) introduction of goals begin by saying that Burnsville will continue to establish new standards to guide future redevelopment and maintain a balance between residential, commercial and industrial land uses. Although the goals for Future Land Use Planning do not specifically state the promotion of mixed use, or vertical mixed use, this concept is addressed in three other sections of this Future Land Use Planning Chapter, as follows: (1) As part of Burnsvilles vacant and underutilized site analysis in Ch. 2 of Comp Plan, yield plans were prepared that all recommend mixed use typically with residential provided on upper floors of multi-story buildings (Comprehensive Plan, Chapter 11, p 18, 5.2). (2) As part of Burnsvilles aging retail strip center redevelopment analysis in Ch. 2 of Comp Plan, mixed use is utilized; and the plan states the residential component will typically be in addition to the existing business square footage/floor areas because anticipated residential will be in the form of attached units located above lower level business or incorporated as row homes/townhomes in addition to the business use(Comprehensive Plan, Chapter 11, p22-23, 6.1). (3) As part of Burnsvilles Neighborhood Centers Redevelopment Analysis, yield plans were created that all recommend a minimum percentage of mixed use (Appendix T of Comprehensive Plan, Neighborhood Center Yield Plans, is attached).
Burnsville created design guidelines for their downtown district, known as HOC, that suggests recommended design objectives. These objectives suggest overall character without dictating specific design requirements. They are qualitative, not quantitative, so there are not strict written standards for mixed use (reference visuals in HOC Design Manual; page III-8 H, I, L, M, N & P). Also, in the HOC Design Manuals, it is written in the factors that influence redevelopment that the demand figures assume that a variety of uses will be developed in a compact form and that a mix of uses will occur within most buildings.
TWO STAR:
Density Bonus Guidelines have been developed in the MIX Zoning District: Multiple-family housing, as part of a mixed use development or freestanding, may pursue an increase in density up to twenty five percent (25%) through a reduction in the required lot area per unit, based on the following bonus features and square foot reductions: (1) Underground parking - 1 parking space per efficiency and 1 bedroom unity and 2 parking.


THREE STAR:
The HOC District received Livable Communities grant funds for mixed use with 20% of the housing option in the HOC planned as work force or affordable housing. Grande Market Place is a private mixed use development and the public CDA Townhomes within HOC both have affordable housing units (50 apartment units and 34 townhomes respectively). Grand Market Place offers 113 studio through 2-bedroom apartments and 30,000 sq. ft. of commercial space. 50% of the apartment units are affordable to people with incomes at or below 50% of the area median income. The city has a livable communities agreement with the Met Council and as of 2007, Burnsville was one of the top 20 metro area communities for LCA Housing Performance Scores.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Residential Density Bonuses in the MIXED USE DISTRICT: Multiple-family housing, as part of a mixed use development or freestanding, may pursue an increase in density up to twenty five percent (25%) through a reduction in the required lot area per unit, based on the following bonus features and square foot reductions:

1. Underground Parking: 1 parking space per efficiency and 1 bedroom unit and 2 parking spaces per 2 or more bedroom units is provided within an underground parking structure attached to the principal building. Square Foot Reduction to Lot Area Per Unit = 200.
2. Registered Green Building: Building must be a registered green building (any level) in accordance with the USGBC (United States Green Building Council). Square Foot Reduction to Lot Area Per Unit = 300.
3. Public Transit: The site is located within 300 feet of a bus stop or transit station and the site design provides pedestrian connections to the bus stop or transit station. Square Foot Reduction to Lot Area Per Unit = 300.
4. Recreation, Indoor: The mixed use or multiple-family building provides an indoor recreation and/or social room equal to 25 square feet per unit. Square Foot Reduction to Lot Area Per Unit = 100.
(Ord. 1247, 9-20-2011)
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524

Efficient Highway- and Auto-Oriented Development {BP no.9}

2 star - Action 1:

Establish design goals for at least one highway/auto-oriented corridor/cluster.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Burnsville completed design guidelines for the Interstate 35W corridor as it enters Burnsville from the north, also known as Burnsville's North Gateway District. For the North Gateway Design Guidelines indicates that there were numerous community visioning and planning initiatives that spanned 2 decades including Partnerships for Tomorrow and Vision for Tomorrow (See attached North Gateway Design Standards). When the actual guideline manual and zoning district was developed in 2006, the affected property owners were also involved in the process. The city had also done community wide visioning that concentrated on this north gateway area of the community in preparation for the 1990 and 2000 comp plan updates.
A visual preference study was also done for the North Gateway design guidelines similar to the Heart of the City Design Guidelines process and many of the graphics included in the design manual are from the visual preference presentations that were done as part of the guideline and zoning development process for the North Gateway. (See attached guidelines).
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
3 star - Action 2:

Participate in regional economic development planning with representatives from surrounding townships, cities, the county and business interests to:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Burnsville is a Greater MSP Participant, which is regional economic development partnership. Burnsville is part of Dakota Futures. Burnsville is a founding member of RLB, which represents an association of three Dakota County communities that have joined to promote economic development in the cities of Rosemount, Lakeville & Burnsville. In order to estimate commerical/industrial needs among all jurisdictions, Burnsville participated with Dakota County CDA in the development of 2008 Maxfield Study "A Market Study for Commercial and Industrial Space in Dakota County, MN" (See attached document).
Burnsville is already developed along all highways and has redevelopment options outlined in the Comprehensive Plan for MRQ; HOC and Business/Industrial along CSAH 42. There are no areas along CSAH 42 from Savage west corporate border to east of I-35E; Along STH 13/I35W corridor adjacent to MRQ with low density development planned or zoned in Burnsville. See Comp Plan Land Use Plan for MRQ and I-3 Office & Industrial land use and zoning districts for GIH, GIM, B4, I-3 and B-3. The MRQ plan showing a new interchange on I35W midway between Black Dog Rd & STH 13 (the current interchange at Cliff Rd would be closed) has been approved in concept by MnDOT along with Chowen Avenue future interchange on STH 13 (also planned by Dakota County & MnDOT) and the interchange at CSAH 5/STH 13 which will be constructed in 2013-2014 is approved by Dakota County & MNDOT). The Comp Plan land use plan has been approved by Met Council and accepted by Dakota County and the city has implemented the zoning districts and is in process of acquiring right-of-way and official platting of some of the roadways within MRQ) The MRQ plan calls for development of high density commercial/industrial and business park/medical campus along STH 13 & I35W. Also in the MRQ plan, the only residential will be upper floor mixed use with residential on top of commercial/office/retail or the small area of attached multifamily adjacent to the future quarry lake in the NE part of MRQ. Any residential will be at least 1/8 mile from I-35W corridor based on the current plan objectives. See Comprehensive Plan and Zoning Districts for references on Burnsville's website.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
2 star - Action 3:

Adopt infrastructure design standards that protect the economic and ecologic functions of the highway corridor through clustering of development, plantings and incorporating access management standards.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Burnsville adopted the North Gateway Design Standards to guide development along highway corridors that serve as the gateway to Burnsville. Redevelopment guidelines were also developed for the area of the city located south of the Minnesota River, east of the City of Savage border, west of I-35W and north of Highway 13.

Burnsville also underwent a study of Highway Corridor 13 to analyze future traffic in this area.


Burnsville's Gateway District classification was developed and incorporated into the 2000 Comprehensive Plan and the corresponding Gateway District Overlay zone was established. Development within this classification is subject to the "Burnsville North Gateway Design Guidlines" manual that can be found the Burnsville Website at www.burnsville.org. The classification applies to lands located noth of Highway 13 and along both sides of Interstate 35W which is the northern gateway entrance to the city. The purpose of the Gateway District is to reflect there is a steadfast and ongoing commitment to the tranformation from intense land altering industrial activity to future land uses and activities that thrive in sustainable relationships with restored natural resources systems. The deisgn standards outlined in the BUrnsville North Gateway District Design Guidelines provide site design, architectural building treatments, landscaping and storm water treatment and are intended to provide a framework for evaluating projects to ensure that they contribute to a positive image for the District as land redevelops over time.

The Minnesota River Quadrant (MRQ) is a special district that was added in the 2030 Comrehensive Plan Update Land Use Guide Plan. This classification has been created to reflect the unique, long-term redevelopment vision for the area of the city located south of the Minnesota River, east of the City of Savage border, west of I-35W and north of Highway 13. The land use plan provides goals, policies and objectives for the area. The plan was developed to promote the redevelopment of the MRQ in the following ways: (1) To utilize the MRQ Concept Development Plan as a tool to guide redevelopment activities, reclaim the river front, improve public access and enjoyment of natural areas, support business and employment expansion, improve transportation and circulation withing MRQ and to link other areas of Burnsville. (2) Encourage development of..... energy efficient operations with the MRQ. (3) Continue to partner with property owners to develop the MRQ as a regional recreation and employment center for Burnsville and the south metro.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
The attachment includes the following:

(1)Highway 13 Corridor Study
(2) MRQ and North Gateway Future Land Use Guide Plan (highlighted areas)
(3) North Gateway Design Standards

Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
1 star - Action 4:

Adopt development policies for large-format developments, zoning for auto-oriented commercial districts at the sub-urban edge and/or in tightly defined and smaller urban development corridors/nodes that have some bike/walk/transit access.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Burnsville has a highway commercial district. Please see attached document. Burnsville is 98% developed and has always implemented Comprehensive Planning and Capital Improvements Planning.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524

Design for Natural Resource Conservation {BP no.10}

1 star - Action 1:

Conduct a Natural Resource Inventory or Assessment (NRI or NRA); incorporate protection of priority natural systems or resources such as groundwater through the subdivision or development process.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
In 1999, Burnsville created its first Natural Resource Master Plan, and
one of the first in all of the Minneapolis/St. Paul metropolitan area.
This progressive act set in motion programs and policies to protect
Burnsvilles natural resources, such as a prairie management plan, a
water resources management plan, and goose and deer management
policies, and initiated a policy to direct the private development of
remaining open space in an environmentally sound manner. The plan was updated in 2007. Continuous periodic updates to the plan will be made. Burnsville's Comprehensive Plan states that the city shall: "Implement and maintain the Natural Resources Master Plan, and maximize opportunities to preserve such resources by partnering with County, State, Regional, Federal and private programs."

Burnsville has a CD, CONSERVANCY DISTRICT. This is a zoning district established for the preservation of sensitive natural area and the protection and enhancement of wildlife habitat. The CD may be applied to either public or private land. Areas included in this district are unsuitable for residential, commercial, industrial and most institutional development, due to flooding, high water table, restrictive soil conditions, steep slopes, significant and valuable vegetation and/or wildlife habitat.
The FLOOD PLAIN DISTRICT is a district with regulations to minimize impacts to property
and life by managing and regulating development activities in designated floodplains on the
Flood Insurance Studies for Burnsville. There are three sub-districts the FW, Floodway District
(the channel of the Minnesota River); FF, Flood Fringe District (the portion of the floodplain that is outside of the floodway) and the GFP, General Flood Plain District (the lake bed and areas adjoining a wetland, lake or watercourse which have been or hereafter may be covered by the
regional flood).
The following Environmental Overlay Districts are part of the Zoning Ordinance and their
purpose is to protect environmentally sensitive areas within designated areas of the City:
Wetlands Overlay District: This district implements the 1991 Wetland Conservation Act and the accompanying rules of the Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources and is intended to
conserve, protect, enhance, and result in the no net loss of wetlands in Burnsville. Additionally
the regulations promote the restoration of degraded wetlands.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
3 star - Action 3:

For cities within metropolitan areas, incorporate woodland best management practices addressing protection of wooded areas into zoning or development review.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Burnsville has a Woodland Preservation Packet & Zoning Woodland Overlay District. The best management practices are listed in the attached PDF.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524

Transportation Transportation

Living Streets {BP no.11}

2 star - Action 1:

Adopt a complete streets policy, or a living streets policy, which addresses landscaping and stormwater.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
In 2012, Burnsville adopted a Sustainable Infrastructure Policy that addresses street trees and storm water management.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
Not rated - Action 3:

Modify a street in compliance with the city's complete streets policy.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
In 2011, Burnsville installed 14 rain gardens in the neighborhood surrounding Keller Lake. These rain gardens are located on residential single-family home front yards, and are maintained by residents.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
1 star - Action 5:

Identify and remedy street-trail gaps between city streets and off-road trails/bike trails to better facilitate walking and biking.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Burnsville has filled in many gaps along MN Highway 13 to allow for contiguous walking and biking on a separate trail. This trail connects to off-road trails through River Hills Park and into trails in Eagan (as seen on the attached map). Burnsville has secured a grant to build a section of the Black Dog Regional Trail between 35W and Cedar where there was a large gap.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
1 star - Action 6:

Implement traffic calming policy/measures, including lane conversions (road diets), roundabouts, shared space and depaving, in at least one street redevelopment project.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Heart of the City has the following traffic calming measures: - bumput parkings, intersection markings, and medians.

A street project in southwestern Burnsville made the street lanes significantly narrower.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524

Mobility Options {BP no.12}

1 star - Action 1:

Increase walking, biking and transit use by one or more of the following means:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Burnsville Parks & Trails Map is available on the City of Burnsville's website. Bike racks are provided in all City Parks. Bike racks and shower facilites are available at City Hall. Burnsville's downtown core, Heart of the City District, has installed bike racks in all city-owned parking ramps and decks.

In terms of bus infrastructure, Burnsville partners with the Minnesota Valley Transit Authority which provides all infrastructure, including benches, signage, shelters, and park and ride lots.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
MN Valley Transit Authority
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
1 star - Action 2:

Conduct an Active Living campaign such as a Safe Routes to School program.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of Burnsville is implementing a SFTS for Sioux Trail School. The city received a grant in the amount of $132,338.40 for the following elements of a SRTS program:
o construction of a 10 foot wide bituminous trail connection from the school to an existing trail along the north of T.H. 13 (mixed use trail).
o Replacement of existing concrete sidewalk in the vicinity of the bicycle racks along the southwest side of the school building to address drainage issues.
o Installation of solar powered Blinker signs at two existing crosswalk locations on River Hills Drive.

The city also has a non-infrastructure SRTS for Echo Park Elementary School where:
o On Walk to School Day the police department walks with the school
o We also have signage (school Mascot) along the school route for kids to follow each day they walk.

Parent surveys were done before the construction of the path regarding a number of questions. When the project is complete (Fall 2012) another survey will be done to measure the number of children using the path. The survey will determine how many kids will be uses it once the construction is complete and do the parents feel safe letting their kids use the new route.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
1 star - Action 3:

Prominently identify mobility options: transit; paratransit/Dial-A-Ride; ridesharing/cab services; rental cars; bikes; airports.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Links to the cities public transit, MVTA, and DARTS are provided on Burnsville's website, under New Residents Tab on Home Page.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
1 star - Action 6:

Add/expand transit service, or promote car/bike sharing.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Burnsville's public transportation is provided by Minnesota Valley Transit Authority, which links Burnsville to the northern cities (Rosemount, Lakeville & Apple Valley), western cities ( Savage), and northern cities (Richfield, Eagan, Mendota Heights, Minneapolis, & Saint Paul).

Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
MN Valley Transit Authority
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524

Efficient City Fleets {BP no.13}

2 star - Action 2:

Right-size/down-size the city fleet with the most fuel-efficient vehicles that are of an optimal size and capacity for their intended functions.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of Burnsville's Fleet Manager has an inventory of the City Fleet that includes vehicle's use, MPG and replacement time frame. The City replaced the entire Building Inspection's Fleet with hybrid Toyota Prius vehicles. Originally, this fleet consisted of mostly Ford Taurus sedans.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
The Building Inspection Fleet has been completely replaced. There are 5 cars in total. The Toyota Prius get's an average 40-45 MPG, and the sedan they replaced averaged 15 MPG.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
2 star - Action 3:

Phase-in operational changes, equipment changes including electric vehicles, and no-idling practices for city or local transit fleets.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
When considering fuel efficiency, the City of Burnsville's Fleet Manager monitors fuel usage and cost on a monthly basis, and follow's a regular maintenance schedule according to the vehicle's manufacturer to optimize vehicle life and fuel efficiency. In order to ensure that fuel efficient cars are utilized optimally, staff that drive the hybrid Toyota Prius vehicles are required to attend a training held by Burnsville's Fleet Manager. The City is also in the process of implementing a no-idling policy; it will be fully instated within the next 6 months. Lower-carbon emitting fuels are used when financially feasible; the city has installed an E-85 pumping station that 52 vehicles in it's fleet are equipped to run on. Originally, all of these vehicles regularly re-fueled with E85, but over the past year the price of E85 has jumped tremendously, and less vehicles utilize this fuel. The Ice Center has two ice-resurfacing vehicles that run on High Pressure Natural Gas.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
1 star - Action 6:

Retrofit city diesel engines or install auxiliary power units and/or electrified parking spaces, utilizing Project GreenFleet or the like.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Burnsville participates in Project GreenFleet. To date, 4 city diesel engines have been retrofitted. Eleven engines have systems ordered and these will be installed in the near future. Within the next few months, every city vehicle that is less than Tier 3 will have an upgraded emission system.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:

Demand-Side Travel Planning {BP no.14}

1 star - Action 1:

Reduce or eliminate parking minimums: add parking maximums; develop district parking.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Burnsville completed a parking study in 2006, and subsequently created maximum parking standards for shopping centers and offices. Shopping Centers that are less than 50,000 sq. ft. must have a minimum of 5.5 spaces and a maximum of 6 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. For shopping centers that are between 50,000 sq. ft and 100,000 sq. ft, the parking minimum is 4 spaces and the maximum is 4.5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft. For shopping centers that are greater than 100,001 square feet, the parking minimum is 4.5 spaces and the maximum is 5 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft.
OFFICES that are 6,000 sq. ft. or less must have a minimum of 5 spaces and a maximum of 5.5 spaces per 1,000 square feet. Offices that are 6,000 sq. ft. or larger must have a minimum of 3.5 spaces and a maximum of 4 spaces per 1,000 sq. ft.

Burnsville encourages developers to pursue "proof of parking".
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
1 star - Action 2:

For cities with regular transit service, require or provide incentives for the siting of retail services at transit/density nodes.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The regular transit service in Burnsville is the Metro Valley Transit Authority. When new businesses come to Burnsville, they must go through the PUD process. In this process, certain incentives may entice businesses to be located along bus routes, such as more flexibility in their parking lot designs, and green space requirements.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
Not rated - Action 4:

Incorporate into development regulations a travel demand management plan or transit-oriented development standards or LEED for Neighborhood Development certification.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
In process.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524

Environmental Management Environmental Management

Sustainable Purchasing {BP no.15}

2 star - Action 1:

Adopt a sustainable purchasing policy or administrative guidelines/practices directing that the city purchase at least:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City Council adopted an EPP policy on 1/15/2013. The policy encourages an increase in purchasing that reflects the City's commitment to sustainability and includes areas that relate to 1. Recycled Paper Products and Recycled-Content Products 2. Waste Minimization 3. Energy Saving Products 4. Water Saving Products and 5. Cleaning Products.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
1 star - Action 7:

Lower the environmental footprint of meetings and events in the city.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Burnsville distributed recycling and green tips for party organizers of Night to Unite in August of 2012 and will continue to distribute them for the upcoming year. Offered recycling “X-Frames” to Night to Unite block party organizers and several organizers used the containers at their parties.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524

Community Forests and Soils {BP no.16}

1 star - Action 1:

Certify as a Tree City USA.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of Burnsville is a certified participant of Tree City USA (12 years).
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
1 star - Action 4:

Maximize tree planting along your main downtown street or throughout the city.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Burnsville's Heart of the City (downtown) has trees on both sides of the street at intervals of 30 feet. Beginning in 2012, Burnsville has a Boulevard Tree Planting Permit program for residents and businesses.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
2 star - Action 5:

Adopt a tree preservation or native landscaping ordinance.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of Burnsville has a Zoning Ordinance Woodland Preservation Overlay District. Please see attached PDF. In 2008, the city updated its landscape ordinance to promote native plantings.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
3 star - Action 6:

Build community capacity to protect existing trees by one or more of:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Four city staff members are certified Tree Inspectors. Burnsville has an Emerald Ash Borer Management Plan.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524

Stormwater Management {BP no.17}

3 star - Action 2:

Complete the GreenStep Municipal Stormwater Management Assessment.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
As of May 8th, 2012, the City of Burnsville was recognized the City Council as a Blue Star City, tied for 4th place on the Leader Board.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
1 star - Action 3:

Adopt by ordinance one or more of the following stormwater infiltration/management strategies:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of Burnsville's general design standards allow for reduction of road widths to 24-feet for two-way traffic and one-way traffic and fire lanes down to 20-feet.

The City of Burnsville's infiltration requirement is 1 inch for new development, and 1/2 inch for redevelopment.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
1 star - Action 5:

Adopt and implement guidelines or design standards/incentives for at least one of the following stormwater infiltration/reuse practices:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Within the City of Burnsville's parking standards, landscape standards, and PUD zoning ordinance provide for pervious pavement/paver systems & rain water gardens.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
Not rated - Action 6:

Reduce de-icing and dust suppressant salt use to prevent permanent surfacewater and groundwater pollution.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of Burnsville has an Erosion/Sediment Control Ordinance (Title 10 - 8 - 8). Details of the ordinance include: permanent stormwater treatment in place, require 1/2 inch for redevelopment, 1 inch infiltration for new development. The water quality requirements for redevelopment are 70% total suspended solids removal, and 30% total phosphorus removal. New development water quality requirements are 90% TSS and 60% phosophorus. Rate control requirement: Redevelopment and new maintains runoff rates at existing levels for the 2 ,10 and 100 year events.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524

Parks and Trails {BP no.18}

1 star - Action 1:

Make improvements within your city's system of parks, offroad trails and open spaces.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of Burnsville have remedied connectivity breaks within the city:
In 2008, the city acquired a stormwater management pond for Burnsville Center. In 1992, the city acquired 10 acres of land adjacent to Terrace Oaks West Park creating a natural area. In 1996, the city acquired 75 acres for the Rudy Kraemer Nature Preserve.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
2 star - Action 2:

Plan and budget for a network of parks, green spaces, water features and trails for areas where new development is planned.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Burnsville has developed a Parks and Trails Master Plan, which can be found within the cities Comprehensive Plan. Part of this plan includes Burnsville's subdivision ordinance that requires new developments to have develop open spaces like parks, bike trails, etc. The subdivision ordinance is attached.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
2 star - Action 3:

Achieve minimum levels of city green space and maximize the percent within a ten-minute walk of community members.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of Burnsville provides about 46 acres of parkland per 1,000 residents. Burnsville has 25% of its total land area in parks, open space/conservancy, and open water.

Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
3 star - Action 5:

Create park/city land management standards/practices that maximize at least one of the following:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of Burnsville uses storm water ponds for irrigation at the following sites: Youth Ball Field Complex Sioux Fisher Memorial, Crystal Park and Lac Lavon Park(use lake water).

The City of Burnsville's Civic center converted three acres of turf grass to native grass. City of Burnsville Ice Center converted one acre of turf grass to native grass.

Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
1 star - Action 6:

Certify at least one golf course in the Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary Program.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
In 2010, the Burnumwood Golf Course was re-certified as Audobon Coop Sanctuary.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
2 star - Action 8:

Develop a program to involve community members in hands-on land restoration, invasive species management and stewardship projects.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of Burnsville has several programs that involve community members in hands-on land restoration and stewardship projects: The city has a program to encouraging residents to remove Buckthorn from their property. Community members can apply for grants to remove buckthorn, and the city will handle the disposal of buckthorn. The city offers a rental services for residents to check out land restoration equipment from the city. The city holds a plant sale for shade tolerant native plants to replace buckthorn.

The City of Burnsville worked with Sioux Trail Elementary to restore a half acre prarie by the school.
A neighborhood initiative within Keller Park restored three acres to native prairie.

The city partners with Dakota County Conservation Districts to provide classes on how to design and build rain gardens.

The city also has given 10 $1,000 grants to community members to restore shore land through the removal of buckthorn from the property.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524

Surface Water {BP no.19}

2 star - Action 3:

Adopt and report on measurable, publicly announced surface water improvement targets for water bodies, including the percent of lake, river, wetland and ditch shoreline with at least a 50-foot vegetation buffer.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of Burnsville participates with the cities of Apple Valley, Lakeville, Eagan and Savage on the Black Dog Water Management Organization (BDWMO).

The organization is active with surface water management issues in the areas of these cities covered by the BDWMO. The BDWMO covers 17,730 acres or 27.7 sq. miles and 72% of the watershed lies within the City of Burnsville.

The City of Burnsville also has participants in CAMP. The Citizen-Assisted Monitoring Program (CAMP) is an Metropolitan Council Environmental Services--managed program for which citizen volunteers monitor the water quality of Twin Cities metro area. A total of 160 CAMP lakes were monitored in 2005.

In Burnsville, the following lakes are monitored: Alimagnet, Crystal, Earley, Keller, (South) Twin, Wood, and Sunset Pond. On a bi-weekly basis (April-October), each volunteer collects a surface water sample for laboratory analysis of total phosphorus, nitrogen, and chlorophyll-a, obtains a Secchi transparency measurement, and provides some user perception information about the lake's physical and recreational condition. The main purpose of CAMP is to provide the City with water quality information that will not only help us properly manage these resources, but will also help document water quality impacts and trends. Volunteers also increase their awareness of their lake's condition and some are even compelled to take a more active approach in protecting and managing their lakes.

For over nine years, Burnsville citizen volunteers have monitored wetlands through the Wetland Health Evaluation Program (WHEP), a nationally recognized program that operates primarily in Dakota and Hennepin Counties. Through the program, volunteer groups collect vital information about wetland health, including biological indicators such as vegetation and macroinvertebrates (tiny animals without backbones). Because of the programs strong protocol design and training, WHEP has been extremely successful at providing quality data to Burnsville and to the Pollution Control Agency. It also provides a unique educational experience for volunteers of all levels. For more information, visit the WHEP website.

The City of Burnsville also works with Lake Associations within Burnsville to determine water quality goals.

The water "grades", clarity levels, and other goals can be found in the Water Resources Management Plan attached. Additionally, the City publishes the status of water resources annually in the city newsletter, and also provides updates to the lake associations and watershed organizations.


Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
1 star - Action 4:

Adopt a shoreland ordinance for all river and lake shoreland areas; reduce flooding and costs through The National Flood Insurance Program's Community Rating System.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City has an adopted Shoreland Management Ordinance that is consistent with DNR Rules
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524

Efficient Water and Wastewater Systems {BP no.20}

2 star - Action 2:

Plan and budget for motor maintenance and upgrades so as to assure the most energy efficient, durable and appropriate equipment is available when upgrades or break downs occur.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Burnsville has Rehabilitation Plan for it's pumps, motors and variable frequency plans, that operates on a 10 year cycle. The city usually buys the most energy efficient parts for replacement. Most often, the city will receive generous rebates, so the most energy efficient parts are also the most cost efficient. The City upgraded it's SCADA system in 2010 and uses kilowatt measurements as a real time efficiency measure. Burnsville is in the process of planning a complete water plant upgrade, which will begin in 2016.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
2 star - Action 4:

Optimize energy and chemicals use at drinking water / wastewater facilities and decrease chloride in wastewater discharges.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
-The City of Burnsville pumps the majority of it's water at night, securing a cheaper electrical rate.
-The City has many natural gas pumps and motors, versus electric.
-Installed a peaking generator for load/shaving and cost savings in the 1990s.

The City evaluates pump efficiency in it's 10 Year Cycle Rehabilitation Plan. If a pump needs to be replaced, the city applies for rebates that usually make the most energy efficient pumps that most cost efficient.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524

Septic Systems {BP no.21}

2 star - Action 1:

Report to landowners suspected noncompliant or failing septic systems as part of an educational, informational and financial assistance and outreach program designed to trigger voluntary landowner action to improve septic systems.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City coordinated with Minnesota Extension Service to provide a presentation and information for property owners on how to maintain septic systems. The city maintains records of pumping of septic tanks, and reviews SSTS at time of building and/or plumbing permit application for new construction, bed room additions, change in occupancy, and for any repair or replacement components that will latr the original function of the system. The City has a listing of all SSTS in the city and a management plan is required at the time of new SSTS installation or replacement. Systems that are not operated under a management plan need to submit inspection reports every three years. The City maintains the records and contacts owners if inspections are not done at the three year intervals. The City also provides inspections and assistance for disclosure statements and certificates of compliance prior to the slae or transfer of real property in the city. The city works with licensed maintenance businesses to ensure all written reports are provided to the homeowner and city any time SSTS maintenance work is performed.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
1 star - Action 2:

Use a community process to address failing septic systems.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City administers the SSTS program and all provisions of the 2011 SSTS Ordinance. The City has a plumbing inspector that is responsible for administering the ordinance and inspecting the SSTS systems
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
1 star - Action 3:

Clarify/establish one or more responsible management entities for the proper design, siting, installation, operation, monitoring and maintenance of septic systems.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City administers the SSTS program and all provisions of the 2011 SSTS Ordinance. The City has a plumbing inspector that is responsible for administering the ordinance and inspecting the SSTS systems

Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
1 star - Action 4:

Adopt a subsurface sewage treatment system ordinance based on the Association of Minnesota Counties' model ordinance.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City adopted an updated SSTS Ordinance February 8, 2011 that complies with MPCA and Dakota County Ordinances/Rules
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
2 star - Action 5:

Create a program to finance septic system upgrades.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City has Policies 5.035 and 5.036 which outline options for connecting to existing trunk mains in CSAH 5 and that outline the conditions under which street and utility improvemens will be provided in SW Burnsville (area zoned R1A, Single Family Rural Residential) Policy 5.036 allows property owners to elect to have the connection charge assessed to their property to allow for payment over a period of up to 10 years to help offest costs. Property owners may either undertake major repairs/renovation ot SSTS systems or connect to public utilities. The city will not order connection to the municipal system unless a documented health risk is determined or if ordered by MPCA.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
1 star - Action 6:

Work with homeowners and businesses in environmentally sensitive areas and areas where standard septic systems are not the least-cost option to promote innovative waste water systems, including central sewer extensions.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The entire City of Burnsville is within the Metropolitan Urban Service Area. City SSTS ordinance specifies that SSTS need to be located to achieve maximum economic feasibility to allow for future connection to the public sewer system when it becomes available. There are separate City Council policies that provide special consideration for property owners with SSTS indicating that the city will not initiate sanitary sewer and water utility extensions into the R1A (SW Burnsville) area unless the city documents a significant threat to public health. These policies provide a measure of protection for rural homeowners and allow them to amoratize investments in their private systems over time.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
Not rated - Action 7:

Arrange for assistance to commercial, retail and industrial businesses with water use reduction, pollution prevention and pretreatment prior to discharge to septics.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
There are few businesses that are not connected to public utilities in Burnsville. The few that operate are low water users such as salt storage or outdoor storage operations
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524

Local Air Quality {BP no.23}

1 star - Action 2:

Regulate outdoor wood burning, using ordinance language, performance standards and bans as appropriate, for at least one of the following:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Burnsville has a City Ordinance that regulates outdoor wood burning (ordinance is attached).
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
Not rated - Action 5:

Install, assist with and promote publicly available EV charging stations or public fueling stations for alternative fuel vehicles. 

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524

Resilient Economic & Community Development Resilient Economic and Community Development

Benchmarks and Community Engagement {BP no.24}

1 star - Action 1:

Use a city commission, or committee to lead, coordinate, and report to and engage community members on implementation of sustainability best practices.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Burnsville became a GreenStep City on April 17th, 2012, and shortly after, began to enter completed Best Practices and Actions onto this GreenStep Cities website. On June 21st, Burnsville will be recognized as a Step 2 City based on the actions completed. After this ceremony, Sue Bast (Burnsville's GreenStep City coordinator), will develop an article for the cities newsletter that goes to all residents and some businesses. Sue will also write a press release. In the following year's Annual Sustainability Report, Burnsville's GreenStep City's status will be incorporated. This report is available online off the city's website.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
2 star - Action 2:

Organize goals/outcome measures from all city plans and report to community members data that show progress toward meeting these goals.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Burnsville publishes its sustainabilty report annually on the city website. Burnsville has adopted several different goals/measures regarding sustainability that are included in this report. Also, Burnsville reports data on it's drinking water for community members.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
2 star - Action 3:

Measure and report progress on sustainability indicators including energy use/greenhouse gas emissions, social vitality/social inclusion outcome measures.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of Burnsville has a Park and Natural Resources Commission that is appointed by the City Council and consists of community members. Every year, the city presents the annual sustainability report to this commission for comments. Additionally, Burnsville has an employee based sustainability team.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
The City of Burnsville generates indicators in terms of an annual Sustainability Update. metrics include GHG emissions, city property conservation statistics and other indicators. The Sustainability Update is attached.
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
Not rated - Action 4:

Conduct or support a broad sustainability education and action campaign involving:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of Burnsville's Newsletter advertised the MN Energy Challenge. Additionally, the city hosted the ARROW Green Business Workshop in 2011; The workshop was widely advertised and all businesses located in Burnsville were invited.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524

Green Business Development {BP no.25}

1 star - Action 1:

Grow new/emerging green businesses and green jobs through targeted assistance and new workforce development.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Burnsville provides energy and waste reduction awareness and assistance to local businesses through the ARROW program: Awards for Reduction and Recycling of Waste. ARROW is a free, voluntary program for businesses in Eagan, Apple Valley and Burnsville, and is implemented by Dakota Valley Recycling. ARROW gives awards to businesses for their recycling and reduction of waste. Every year in the local newspaper, This Week, green business participants of the ARROW program are highlighted. The City links businesses to incubator space or other tangible assets by listing Site and Building Locations and Available Property/Space on the Burnsville's website. The City Economic Development Coordinator maintains a contact list of businesses and industrial building owners; these contacts receive notifications of potential space availability. Burnsville supports targeted workforce training opportunities with community colleges (Inver Hills Community College, Normandale Community College), univerisities Concordia University, University of St. Thomas, St. Mary's University, and the National American University), Dunwoody Technical College, and the Workforce Center. Through all of these partnerships, customized training and credit courses are provided.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
1 star - Action 2:

Create or participate in a marketing/outreach program to connect businesses with assistance providers, including utilities, who provide personalized energy, waste or sustainability audits and assistance.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Through Burnsville's participation in the ARROW Program (Awards for Reduction and Recycling of Waste), Burnsville hosted a Green Business Workshop in 2011. Through this workshop, Burnsville has provided assistance to 3-4 organizations. Through the Arrow program at 2011 workshop they asked businesses if they would be interested in doing a sustainability audit and a number of businesses they provided audits for. A church, a restaurant and an architure firm. For two of these, ARROW gave the city information on how to get the audit, but they did not access. ARROW did sustainability audit, and gave them information about how to conduct an audit with their utility. This assistance is on going, and still available to interested businesses. The ARROW website provides a link to energy rebates available to businesses.
Burnsville's city website has a new sections called "Why Burnsville MN" which includes success stories of local businesses and initiatives such as Burnsville STHEM Alliance.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524

Renewable Energy {BP no.26}

1 star - Action 1:

Adopt wind energy and/or biomass ordinances that allow, enable, or encourage appropriate renewable energy installations.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of Burnsville has a Wind Energy Conversion System Ordinance (10-7-30, attached).
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
1 star - Action 6:

Report installed private sector-owned renewable energy/energy efficient generation capacity with at least one of the following attributes:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Waste Management ahs a methane collection and generation plant by the city landfill. This plant convert's the methane produced by the landfill into electricity. This electricity is then sold to electric utility companies.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524

Local Food {BP no.27}

1 star - Action 2:

Facilitate creation of home/community gardens, chicken & bee keeping, and incorporation of food growing areas/access in multifamily residential developments.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Burnsville adopted an Urban Agriculture Ordinance in 2011. The ordinance allows for local food growing and community gardens throughout the city. Also, in 2009, Burnsville adopted an ordinance (City Code Section 6-2-31) that allows chickens and chicken coops within the city.
Community gardens exist in Niell City Park and Wolk City Park. Burnsville worked with Valley Natural Foods to allow development of demonstration gardens and a community garden on their property (13750 County Road 11). Valley Natural Foods is also a CSA drop-point.

Other examples of farmers markets, and community gardens within Burnsville include:
-St. Paul Farmer's Market received IUP approval to operate at an MVTA site.
-St. Paul Farmer's Market operates at Mary Mother of the Church.
-International Outreach Church operates a community garden at 1512 Woodhill Road.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
2 star - Action 3:

Create, assist with and promote local food production/distribution within the city:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of Burnsville plays a direct role in the Wolk Park Community Garden. This garden is on city property, within a city park, and the city provides the water resources for the garden. The rest of the resources and funding for the garden were raised by the nonprofit organization Woodhill.
Burnsville worked with Valley Natural Foods to allow a community garden to be built adjacent to the co-op's storm ponds.

As far as the city's efforts to created local food access, the city allows a farmer's market downtown at Mary Mother of the Church. A co-op, Valley Natural Foods, is located downtown that is a drop-point for several rural CSAs. Also, their are two community gardens within city parks.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
Not rated - Action 4:

Measurably increase institutional buying, and sales through groceries and restaurants.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The city adopted an ordinance in 2009 to allow chicken and chicken coops within the city on residential property. In 2011, the city adopted an Urban Agriculture Ordinance to allow the development of community gardens throughout the city. Burnsville sent an internal sustainability tip to City employees promoting the purchase of CSAs. This tip will soon be added to the City of Burnsville's external sustainability webpage.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524

Business Synergies and EcoDistricts {BP no.28}

2 star - Action 2:

Document that at least one business/building uses waste heat or water discharge from another business or conducts materials exchange activities with another organization.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of Burnsville utilizes water pumped from Kramer Quarry for potable drinking water. The City coordinated efforts for joint powers agreement with the City of Savage and Kramer Quarry to use water that had been pumped from the quarry for dewatering to allow for limestone collection and to re-use the water for municipal drinking water supply.
Reuse projects are possible because of the cities designation of a PUD zoning district that allows the necessary land uses and zoning clearances. Another reuse project is in operation between Waste Management and the City of Burnsville. Waste Management operates a plant that converts methane gas produced from the landfill into electrical energy and sells this to the electric utility.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524
2 star - Action 4:

Use 21st century ecodistrict tools to structure, guide and link multiple green and sustainable projects together in a mixed-use neighborhood/development, or innovation district, aiming to deliver superior social, environmental and economic outcomes.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2009
Implementation details:
Burnsville's Heart of the City (also called HOC, or downtown zoning district)is walkable, with pedestrian friendly development, mixed uses and a mix of housing types and income levels. The City coordinated with property owners, investors, and agencies such as Dakota CDA and the Met Council to obtain a livable communities grant and develop low to moderate income housing within the HOC. The city purchased property, developed the HOC plan, amended it's Comprehensive Plan, developed HOC Design Guidelines, developed HOC zoning district standards, approved individual site development, and constructed public improvement projects.
The City built a Park and Ride in the Heart of the City that serves multiple businesses, residents, Nicollet Common's Park, and the Burnsville Performing Arts Center. This district has access to MVTA, the park and ride, and other bus transit services. Diamondhead Shopping Center in the Heart of the City was renovated and designed for reuse as the current Burnsville High School Senior Center. Burnsville applies low impact site development to all projects and requires LID agreements to be signed and made part of development agreements.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Sue Bast (City staff) | basts@ci.burnsville.mn.us | 952-895-4524

Climate Adaptation and Community Resilience {BP no.29}

1 star - Action 1:

Prepare to maintain public health and safety during extreme weather and climate-change-related events, while also taking a preventive approach to reduce risk for community members.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Person responsible for city preparedness: Officer David Powers. Officer Powers is developing an emergency preparedness plan in conjunction with Dakota County. The process is beginning in March of 2016 and includes a threats/vulnerability analysis. It will be completed at the end of July 2016.

Hosted a Climate Resiliency Workshop on September 24, 2015. Partnered with Eagan and Apple Valley. See flyer for more details.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
45 city/county staff/elected/appointed officials attended the Climate Resilience Workshop in September 2015. Surveyed the attendees on weather impacts on their jobs, key challenges of climate change and the most valuable thing departments could do.
Descriptive File: view file