City Detail

Background Information

City of Minnetonka
County: Hennepin
Population: 51123
GreenStep City category: A
Full-time equivalent city staff (approx.): 217
Participating township, county, school:

GreenStep Coordinator

Drew Ingvalson
City Staff
952-939-8293
City web page relating to sustainability/GreenStep activities:
GreenStep City resolution: Click here to view the file.
GreenStep City status and date: STEP 4 ( )

City Assessment Files and City Performance Metrics

City councils pass a resolution to join the GreenStep program and are recognized at Step 1. Step 2 and Step 3 recognition levels reflect completed city actions, reported and rated below with stars (1 star = good, 2 stars = better, 3 stars = best). The Assessment File below summarizes completed city actions in a short Word file. Step 4 recognition is awarded to cities who report a minimum number of core metrics for the previous calendar year. These metrics aim to show the aggregate, quantitative results of taking multiple GreenStep actions. Step 5 cities show improvement in the Step 4 metrics. See yearly data for Steps 4&5. Additional city data can be found by reviewing information on B3 Benchmarking and Regional Indicators Initiative.

Assessment File

Best Practice Actions Underway and Completed

Completed actions are denoted by stars.

Total completed actions: 41
1 star actions: 16
2 star actions: 14
3 star actions: 11

Buildings and Lighting Buildings and Lighting

Efficient Existing Public Buildings {BP no.1}

2 star - Action 1:

Enter building information into the Minnesota B3 Benchmarking database and routinely enter monthly energy, water use data for all city-owned buildings.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Through the city’s partnership with Class 5 Energy, Minnetonka has entered energy data into the B3 Benchmarking program for city owned buildings. These buildings include City Hall/ Community Center/ Police Station; Central Fire; Satellite Fire Stations 2-5; Public Works; Williston Center and the Ice Arena. Data has been entered for the city’s core buildings since 2013. Data for the satellite fire stations has been entered beginning in 2015. Minnetonka will continue entering data on a monthly basis.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293
3 star - Action 2:

Make no/low cost indoor lighting and operational changes in city-owned/school buildings to reduce energy costs.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The city owns and operates an ice arena and a fitness facility. The Williston Center is a 77,000 square foot fitness facility the ice arena is approximately 63,000 square feet. Both of these facilities are predominately used by the general public. The public is unlikely to manually shut off lights, therefore, energy use reduction projects focused on minimizing the need for them to do so. The tennis courts make up roughly 40 percent of the Williston Center. Following an energy analysis of the facility, the city began a lighting upgrade project to replace the 63 fixtures with more energy efficient t8 light bulbs. The lighting upgrade also included a delamping project which physically removed one of the three light bulbs in 47 of the fixtures. This reduced the amount of energy used while still maintaining an appropriate amount of light for the facility users. The ice arena has two separate ice rinks (Ice Arena A and Ice Arena B). By scheduling events and ice users throughout the daytime hours to Ice Arena A, staff is generally able to shut down all but the safety lights in Ice Arena B in order to save energy. To further energy savings within the large bleacher area of Ice Arena A, staff shuts all but the safety lighting in some of the bleacher and hallway areas in the lesser used areas of the facilities. Occupancy sensors were installed in the bathroom and changing rooms after staff noticed the lights rarely being shut off by users.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
The lighting project within the tennis building cost $15,000 and had a payback of less than one year.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293
2 star - Action 4:

Implement information technology efforts and city employee engagement to reduce plug loads, building energy use and workflow efficiency.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The city of Minnetonka implemented city-wide power management settings for all employees. Under the new settings, all computers enter into a power-saving sleep mode after 15-minutes of inactivity. City staff has been sending out energy savings tips to all employees every other week. Where appropriate, the city has installed motion sensors on lights, stickers on plug-ins as a reminder to unplug unused appliances; and switch covers. These energy saving efforts are being tracked as part of the Class 5 Energy partnership.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293

Efficient Existing Private Buildings {BP no.2}

1 star - Action 1:

Create or participate in a marketing/outreach/incentive program to promote/achieve residential energy/water use reduction and energy efficiency.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The city offers energy efficiently and water conservation workshops available to all residents and business owners throughout the year. In addition, the city routinely publishes information regarding water conservation and energy efficiency in the city’s monthly newsletter. The Minnetonka Memo is delivered to very address within the city; equating to over 26,000 households. Readership among residents is over 90 percent. In addition to the Minnetonka Memo, the city’s website offers resources and conservation tips for residents. Including information on the “green” home constructed within the city through a partnership between Hennepin County Technical College; the non-profit Neighborhood Energy Connection and the City of Minnetonka. The home construction focused on a sustainable design both within the home and outside the home. Some of the interior features include high-performance insulation and windows; off-peak utilities; low-flow toilets and showers etc. External sustainable features include rain barrels; permeable pavers; and native drought-tolerant landscaping. Sustainability was even carried out through the construction process. Efficient framing methods allowed for a reduction of waste and of the waste produced, more than 70 percent was recycled.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293
1 star - Action 5:

Conserve/protect drinking/groundwater resources by creating a water-wise landscaping ordinance/guidance, WaterSense purchasing program, or guidance on rainwater harvesting and home water softener use.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
In 2001, the Minnetonka City Council adopted an ordinance of water restrictions for the months of May through September. The sprinkling ordinance restricts the sprinkling hours in order to prevent wasteful sprinkling during the day hours. Ordinance number 1200.040 limits lawn sprinkling to before 11:00 a.m. and after 5 p.m. In order to further encourage water conservation, water is billed on a conversation tiered rate. While there is no minimum use charge on water the heaviest water users are charged twice what the lightest users are charged. Commercial and industrial rates are billed at a base rate of $1.80 per 1,000 gallons from October through April, then pay a summer surcharge of $2.15 per 1,000 gallons May through September. Additionally, commercial and industrial irrigation rates are similar to the tiered residential rate structure. This structure aims to target the heaviest commercial and industrial users. Both the residential and commercial/industrial rates may be viewed by visiting the city's website using the provided link.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293

Efficient Outdoor Lighting and Signals {BP no.4}

3 star - Action 8:

Replace the city's existing traffic signals with LEDs.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Beginning in 2009 existing traffic signals were converted from incandescent bulbs to LED’s. Currently, all traffic signals have been converted to LED lighting technology.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293

Building Redevelopment {BP no.5}

1 star - Action 3:

Plan for reuse of large-format retail buildings, or work with a local school, church or commercial building to either add-on space or repurpose space into new uses.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Within the city there are two examples of educational spaces being utilized as both a school use and community space. The Lindbergh Center is a formed partnership between the City and the Hopkins School District. The facility has five basketball courts; eight regulation volleyball courts; 200 meter competitive running track; 300 meter walking/jogging track; and an exercising and conditioning room. The school district utilizes the Lindbergh Center for all district-related activities. Community members are also able to utilize the Lindbergh Center’s equipment, gym space and paths. The Arts Center on 7 is a multi-use arts center located within the Minnetonka High School. The arts center is used for Minnetonka student performances and for community choirs, bands, orchestras, group meetings and performances.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293

Land Use Land Use

Comprehensive, Climate and Energy Plans {BP no.6}

1 star - Action 1:

Adopt a comprehensive plan or (for Category B & C cities) adopt a future land use plan that was adopted by the county or a regional entity.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
On August 25, 2008 the Minnetonka City Council approved the 2030 Comprehensive Guide Plan.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293
3 star - Action 2:

Demonstrate that regulatory ordinances comply with the comprehensive plan including but not limited to having the zoning ordinance explicitly reference the comprehensive plan as the foundational document for decision making.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Development aligning with the city’s comprehensive plan is a fundamental guiding principal for the zoning ordinance. Reference to the comprehensive plan is made in all land use and development ordinances. In addition to the inclusive reference to the comprehensive plan in the Purpose section of the zoning ordinance, individual ordinances also include an explicit reference to the comprehensive plan in their corresponding Purpose section.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293

Efficient Highway- and Auto-Oriented Development {BP no.9}

2 star - Action 1:

Establish design goals for at least one highway/auto-oriented corridor/cluster.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of Minnetonka adopted the PID, Planned I394 District to provide a comprehensive, planned framework for development within the I394 corridor. The PID district encourages high quality development standards for structures within the corridor as these properties are among the most visible within the city. Additionally, the district promotes flexibility in land development and redevelopment in order to utilize newly developed techniques in building and land development while promoting more efficient and effective uses of land. Per the ordinance, master development plans are required for all properties subsequent to its adoption. Additionally, the city has determined that future growth within the PID district should be managed under a framework of development parameters. As such, a development limitation based on p.m. peak hour trip generation is established for all new development. Due to the high visibility of the properties and the evolving redevelopment opportunities, building materials should incorporate facades materials of brick, dimension natural or man-made stone, glass and architectural-grade metal panels and limit the use of stucco and exterior insulated finishing systems.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293

Design for Natural Resource Conservation {BP no.10}

3 star - Action 3:

For cities within metropolitan areas, incorporate woodland best management practices addressing protection of wooded areas into zoning or development review.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
In 2008, the City of Minnetonka adopted the tree protection ordinance into the zoning ordinance. By City Code §300.28, Subd. 19 the purpose of the tree protection ordinance is to preserve to the largest practical extent possible as many of the city’s highly valued tree natural resources, ecosystems and view sheds while still allowing reasonable development to occur and not to interfere with a property owners reasonable use of their property. The tree protection ordinance restricts the amount of unnecessary tree loss by requiring mitigation for the removal of trees outside of the basic tree removal area. The basic tree removal area is 20 feet surrounding buildings. More restrictive tree removals and protection standards for subdivisions are implemented within woodland preservation areas. These areas are defined as ecosystems that are at least two acres in size and qualify and generally meet the criteria of one of several defined ecosystems within the ordinance and are mapped in the city’s Minnesota Land Cover Classification System. For more information please review the attached ordinance.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293

Transportation Transportation

Living Streets {BP no.11}

1 star - Action 1:

Adopt a complete streets policy, or a living streets policy, which addresses landscaping and stormwater.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2008
Implementation details:
The City of Minnetonka's 2008 Comprehensive Plan recognizes the importance of planning for Multi-modal transportation. The City's Comprehensive Plan has sections on the future of the City's Transit System and Bicycle and Trail System. Furthermore, within the City's Comprehensive Plan, the following policies have been identified to support multi-modal transportation: Policy No. 2: Recognize the interrelationship of land use and transportation, and anticipate impacts of the location and intensity of planned land uses on the transportation system, Policy No. 6: Encourage, with other government agencies, the expansion of multi-modal and transit services in the city to support resident and business transportation needs, Policy No. 7: Plan for trails and pedestrian ways as a transportation mode and provide a network of trails and pathway connections to schools, commercial areas, parks, activity centers, and access to transit services.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293
2 star - Action 5:

Identify and remedy street-trail gaps between city streets and off-road trails/bike trails to better facilitate walking and biking.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2013
Implementation details:
In 2013, the City of Minnetonka approved Binger Crossing Second Addition Subdivision. This subdivision has a cul-de-sac end to the development, but added a trail connection from to the dead end road of the subdivision to the Minnetonka trail system. This trail system connects to various parts of the city including Civic Center Park and the Lake Minnetonka LRT Regional Trail.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293
1 star - Action 6:

Implement traffic calming policy/measures, including lane conversions (road diets), roundabouts, shared space and depaving, in at least one street redevelopment project.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2017
Implementation details:
In 2017, the City of Minnetonka began road reconstruction on Crosby Road from McGinty Road to the Wayzata city limits. The reconstruction included narrower lane widths to provide traffic calming. This roadway handles about 2,000 vehicles per day and its geometry is long and straight and provides a short cut for rush hour traffic. The vehicle lanes are being reduced from 12 feet wide to 11 feet wide and concrete curb is being added to provide an additional visual barrier to assist with traffic calming.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293

Mobility Options {BP no.12}

1 star - Action 1:

Increase walking, biking and transit use by one or more of the following means:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
There are miles of running, biking and walking trails within Minnetonka. Many of these trails are part of the 40-mile loop trail corridor system that been planned, developed and maintained by the city. Over three-fourths of the system has already been constructed. The miles of trails and the city’s park system are included on a map available on the city’s webpage or by calling the city’s trail hotline. The map also includes details of the all amenities available within each of the city’s 50 parks.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293
1 star - Action 2:

Conduct an Active Living campaign such as a Safe Routes to School program.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The city of Minnetonka worked with the Minnesota Department of Transportation, Hennepin County and the Hopkins School District to develop a safe routes to school plan to identify off-street pedestrian routes around the Glen Lake Elementary School campus. The city and the school district received a safe routes to school grant for the construction of a sidewalk and crosswalk improvements along CSAH 3 (Excelsior Boulevard, Woodridge Road and internal to the school campus site. The project included 2,300 feet of concrete sidewalks, pedestrian crosswalk and a roadway improvement. The project began in August and was completed in October of 2012. For many years the city has partnered in the Active Living Hennepin County program. Recognizing some barriers for its residents, the city council supports principals to promote physical activity through innovative site design and development patterns.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293

Efficient City Fleets {BP no.13}

2 star - Action 2:

Right-size/down-size the city fleet with the most fuel-efficient vehicles that are of an optimal size and capacity for their intended functions.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The city has continued to “right-size” city fleets to meet various department needs. One city departments opted to release a fleet vehicle because there was not enough usage. The city has moved away from full sized vehicles to mid-size and compact vehicles for most departments. The city has added fuel efficient (hybrid vehicles) where is possible and appropriate. To ensure maximized lifespan and efficiency, all city vehicles are included as part of a regular maintenance schedule.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293
1 star - Action 3:

Phase-in operational changes, equipment changes including electric vehicles, and no-idling practices for city or local transit fleets.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
By monitoring required fuel logs and mileage, staff is able to monitor vehicle idling. This information is used to educate employees about the important of reducing the idle times of city fleet vehicles. When decreased fuel mileage suggests an increase in average idle time, staff is re-educated. The city also uses a maintenance program to optimize fuel efficiency and vehicle life.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293

Environmental Management Environmental Management

Sustainable Purchasing {BP no.15}

2 star - Action 1:

Adopt a sustainable purchasing policy or administrative guidelines/practices directing that the city purchase at least:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2018
Implementation details:
The City of Minnetonka adopted a sustainable purchasing in April 2018 (See attached).
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293
3 star - Action 2:

Purchase energy used by city government - via the municipal utility, green tags, community solar garden, 3rd party - with a higher renewable percentage than required by Minnesota law.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2017
Implementation details:
In 2017, the City of Minnetonka began purchasing electric energy from a solar garden (WGL Energy). In 2017, 32% of the City's full electric load was from 100% solar produced, and the remaining 68% of the energy usage was from 25% renewable.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293
3 star - Action 5:

Set minimum standards for the percentage of recycled-content material in asphalt and roadbed aggregate or other construction materials, and for compost and warm mix asphalt use.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2017
Implementation details:
The City of Minnetonka follows the MnDOT specifications for all public paving projects. This includes allowing RAP and shingles in asphalt mixtures.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293
1 star - Action 7:

Lower the environmental footprint of meetings and events in the city.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The city of Minnetonka boards and commissions went to paperless agendas in April of 2001. Recently, the computers were converted to iPads in 2013.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293

Community Forests and Soils {BP no.16}

1 star - Action 1:

Certify as a Tree City USA.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of Minnetonka was first designated as a Tree City USA in 1994. Available on the city website and annually in the Minnetonka Memo is information on city involvement and benefits of forestry on our community.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293
3 star - Action 6:

Build community capacity to protect existing trees by one or more of:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
In addition to the Minnetonka’s City Forester being a licensed arborist and certified tree inspector; the city employs two additional certified tree inspectors. For several years, Minnetonka has participated in the Minnesota Department of Agriculture’s voluntary early detection program of the emerald ash borer. To date the emerald ash borer has not been detected within the city, the city has a comprehensive emerald ash borer protection plan that is currently being implemented. The plan includes sections pertaining to the prioritization of ash tree removals on public property, budget impacts, replanting and wood waste considerations. The draft plan was presented to the city council in 2013.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293

Stormwater Management {BP no.17}

2 star - Action 3:

Adopt by ordinance one or more of the following stormwater infiltration/management strategies:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The city of Minnetonka ordinance requires a plan to be in compliance with the stormwater management practices required as part of the city’s water resources management plan. Per the plan stormwater treatment: (a) must limit the peak runoff flow rates to that from existing conditions for the 2-, 10-, and 100-year storm events for all points where stormwater leaves the parcel; (b) provide on-site retention of 1-inch of runoff from all impervious surface the preferred method of retention is through the implementation of infiltration practices; (c) treatment of runoff to at least 60-percent annual removal efficiency for total phosphorus and 90-percent total annual removal for total suspended solids.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293

Parks and Trails {BP no.18}

3 star - Action 1:

Make improvements within your city's system of parks, offroad trails and open spaces.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of Minnetonka adopted the Minnetonka Park, Open Space and Trail System Plan (POST plan) in 2000. The plan establishes an approach to managing facilities as well as identified potential connections between city greenways, open space and other conservation areas. The city also refers to the Upper Minnehaha Creek Corridor Vision and Master Plan. While the primary focus of the plan was to implement complementary activities in areas to emphasize the creek’s corridor natural resources the plan also identifies trail connectivity within the city. In conjunction with the Lake Minnetonka LRT regional trail connections are planned at Baker Road, under Plymouth Road, and I-494. In addition to the trail plans associated with the POST plan and the Minnehaha Creek visionary plan the 2030 Comprehensive Plan identifies two regional trail links: (1) CR 101 Regional Trail Connection and (2) North Cedar Lake LRT Regional Trail. The city council annually allocates funding over a five year period for capital projects that involve park, open space, trail and recreational facilities. The 2009-2013 CIP included significant funding to increase connectivity in the city.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293
3 star - Action 2:

Plan and budget for a network of parks, green spaces, water features and trails for areas where new development is planned.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Per the subdivision ordinance, a reasonable portion of land (not less than 10 percent of the property) being subdivided must be dedicated to the city for use as parks, trails or open space. At the city’s discretion, a park dedication fee can be collected in lieu of the required dedication. The collected fees are used for land acquisition or facility improvements. The city utilizes a number to documents to guide the development of additional open space including (1) Chapter 7 of the comprehensive plan regarding Parks, Open Space and Trails; (2) Park, Open Space and Trail System Plan (POST Plan) adopted by the city in 2000; (3) Collaboration with surrounding jurisdictions; and (4) a dedicated Park Board. The park board’s functions include long and short range use of park lands, park facilities, recreational, and leisure time facilities. Implementation tools include the capital improvement plan, outside funding opportunities, park dedication fees and partnerships with other jurisdictions. Currently a significant amount of the capital improvement funding is programed to increase the “connectivity” within the city by improving trail and pathway connections.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293
2 star - Action 3:

Achieve minimum levels of city green space and maximize the percent within a ten-minute walk of community members.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
In the 1990s Minnetonka incorporated a natural resources focus on its green space efforts and began working with several entities including the Minnehaha Creek Watershed District to protect and restore wetland, floodplain and other natural areas. Following an increase in development pressure the city engaged a citizen’s task force to help the city identify strategies to preserve open space and develop criteria for preservation and restoration of natural areas. Today, the city and its residents take pride in the preservation and resident-accessible green space. Almost 24 percent of land within city limits is in protected green space, equating to about 4,100 acres. Over 70 percent of Minnetonka's population are within a half mile of protected openspace larger than one acre in size.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293

Surface Water {BP no.19}

2 star - Action 3:

Adopt and report on measurable, publicly announced surface water improvement targets for water bodies, including the percent of lake, river, wetland and ditch shoreline with at least a 50-foot vegetation buffer.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Since 1993, the City of Minnetonka has implemented a water quality monitoring program that includes routine monitoring of approximately 20 water bodies on a three-year cycle. Under the current program the monitoring data is evaluated and compared to established goals and standards. However, the monitoring program did not take the program a step further to identify BMPs to protect water quality. Recently, the City of Minnetonka was awarded $129,000 accelerated implementation grant funds from the Minnesota Board of Water and Soil Resources (BWSR). The clean water funds will be utilized to conduct water shed assessments of 14 selected water bodies. These assessments will be used to identify priority areas for the installation of best management practices; stormwater management; and water quality treatment efforts to protect or improve the water quality of the city’s natural resources. Additionally the identified BMs will be used to inform the city’s CIP program as well as identify practices to address known water quality issues of several impaired waters.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293
2 star - Action 4:

Adopt a shoreland ordinance for all river and lake shoreland areas; reduce flooding and costs through The National Flood Insurance Program's Community Rating System.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Section 300.25 of the City Code, Shoreland Overlay District, provides regulations for shoreland properties. The overlay district consists of: (1) land containing or abutting public waters and assigned a shoreland management classification by the MN DNR or the city of Minnetonka; (2) land located within 1,000 feet from the ordinary high water level of a lake; and (3) 300 feet from the OHWL of a tributary creek. The ordinance restricts minimum lot area to 22,000 square feet for riparian lots; minimum water frontages at the lot line and minimum setbacks for principal and accessory structures from the OHWL.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293

Sustainable Consumption and Waste {BP no.22}

2 star - Action 1:

Improve city operations and procurement to prevent and reuse, recycle and compost waste from all public facilities (including libraries, parks, schools, municipal health care facilities), and minimize use of toxics and generation of hazardous waste.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
In 2010, the city of Minnetonka received a Waste Abatement Incentive Fund Grant to implement a community facilities organics collection program. The program included a three-phase approach. The first phase introduced the program to one area of the city’s community center where food is served; phase two introduced the program to all areas of city hall including the employee lunch rooms and all restrooms; phase three further expanded the program to all areas of the community center including the banquet center for events with up to 250 guests. In addition to providing the collection containers, the city converted all stock of plates, cups, napkins, paper towels and utensils to compostable materials allowed in organics collection. By 2012, organics collection had expanded to the Minnetonka Summer Festival. This festival is a single-day community event that attracts an average of 10,000 people annually. In addition to the organics program, the city is working to reduce paper waste. The city now offers all water and sewer billing to be paid online or with automatic payments. This reduces the amount of paper being sent out to residents. The city gives a purchasing preference to products with recycled contents, such as calendars for the inspectors made with recycled paper.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
The city continues to utilize the organics collection program in all of the program areas; however, the city has not continued to weigh the collected organic material. During the 781 days of the community facilities organics collection program the city had collected over 65,000 gallons of organics material. Interestingly only 27 gallons of organics material was collected during the first week. By the end of the program the average collection per day averaged about 85 gallons. The recorded collections for the Minnetonka Summer Festival were 2,800 gallons in 2011 and 4,300 gallons in 2012.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293
1 star - Action 5:

Arrange for a residential and/or business/institutional source-separated organics collection/management program.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
In 2007, the City of Minnetonka received a Waste Abatement Incentive Grant from Hennepin County to encourage refuse haulers to offer organics collections to their customers. Since then hundreds of families have signed up for weekly collection of organics. The city identifies and provides contact information for three refuse haulers offering organics collection on its website.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293

Resilient Economic & Community Development Resilient Economic and Community Development

Benchmarks and Community Engagement {BP no.24}

1 star - Action 1:

Use a city commission, or committee to lead, coordinate, and report to and engage community members on implementation of sustainability best practices.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The city of Minnetonka distributes a monthly newsletter to all residential property owners within the City. Included in the newsletter are energy-saving tips and energy-saving efforts initiated by the city. The newsletter also updates citizens on a yearly basis of the city’s GreenStep status. Further, GreenStep initiatives and status are provided in the news and events section of the city’s website.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293
3 star - Action 2:

Organize goals/outcome measures from all city plans and report to community members data that show progress toward meeting these goals.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2012
Implementation details:
Starting in May 2012, the city began completing an annual report called the "strategic profile report." This report includes six major goals and action steps to meet each goal. The strategic profile report is prepared by staff and presented to council to provide progress on the action steps and important key measures in meeting community goals.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293

Green Business Development {BP no.25}

1 star - Action 2:

Create or participate in a marketing/outreach program to connect businesses with assistance providers, including utilities, who provide personalized energy, waste or sustainability audits and assistance.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2018
Implementation details:
The City has placed energy efficiency and financing program resources for businesses and property owners on its website. Such resources include links to companies that provide personalized energy, environmental, sustainability audits and assistance.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293
1 star - Action 4:

Strengthen value-added businesses utilizing local "waste" material.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 1995
Implementation details:
The city’s brush and yard waste drop-off is available for residents, city crews, and the city’s contractors to bring in material. The city has an agreement in place with Minnesota Topsoil to remove the collected material from the city’s site. The leaves and yard waste are trucked to Minnesota Topsoil’s site to be composted. The trees and brush are ground at the drop-off site. A portion of the resulting mulch is left on site and is made available to Minnetonka residents for use on their properties for free, and the material is also used by city staff for landscaping. The remainder of the mulch is hauled away to be further processed and sold in the retail market.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293

Renewable Energy {BP no.26}

1 star - Action 1:

Adopt wind energy and/or biomass ordinances that allow, enable, or encourage appropriate renewable energy installations.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The Minnetonka City Code allows solar equipment as a permitted accessory use within all residential zoning districts. Wind Energy Conversion Systems (WECS) are allowed as conditional uses within residential zoning districts. Additionally the city has recommended approval to the planning commission of solar equipment in other zoning districts as part of the site and building plan review process. Conditional use permit standards include setbacks, system design control standards, and compliance with applicable building and electrical code requirements.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
The city has been tracking the installation of solar panels within the city through the submission of building permits. The city has seen an increase in solar panel installation in recent years.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293
3 star - Action 3:

Promote financing and incentive programs such as PACE for clean energy:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of Minnetonka has entered into a joint powers agreement with the St. Paul Port Authority. The St. Paul Port Authority is designated as the implementing entity to implement and administer the MN PACE program. The program provides a financial opportunity to construct or install energy efficient improvements.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
St. Paul Port Authority
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293

Local Food {BP no.27}

2 star - Action 2:

Facilitate creation of home/community gardens, chicken & bee keeping, and incorporation of food growing areas/access in multifamily residential developments.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Agriculture, farming and truck gardening are permitted uses by right within the city’s predominate single family zoning district. For those who are unable to have a garden, the city owns, organizes and facilitates a community garden with 50 lots. Residents are able to rent up to two 20x20 plots per year. The city has continued to allow “farm animals” within the city. By ordinance, farm animals include cattle, mules, sheep, goats, swine, ducks, geese, turkeys, chickens, guinea hens, horses, rabbits, llamas, ostriches, emus and other animals. While the keeping of farm animals does not require a permit, the number of animals is dependent on the property area and must have a fenced-in area with a shelter. Additionally, bees are allowed within the city by right without a permit. To date, the city has knowledge of at least four active beehives.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293
2 star - Action 3:

Create, assist with and promote local food production/distribution within the city:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Minnetonka hosts a Farmer's Market from June through September at the civic center campus. City staff facilitates the vendors and organizes the weekly event. Additionally, the city owns, organizes and facilitates 50 community garden plots. Residents are able to rent up to two 20x20 plots per year.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293

Climate Adaptation and Community Resilience {BP no.29}

2 star - Action 1:

Prepare to maintain public health and safety during extreme weather and climate-change-related events, while also taking a preventive approach to reduce risk for community members.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2017
Implementation details:
The City of Minnetonka does not have its own mitigation plan. The city signs off on the Hennepin County Mitigation Plan as a full partner every two years, when the county revises the plan. The latest revision of the mitigation plan is complete and in the county approval process. The city’s all-hazard emergency plan also identifies the lead and support city department for all-hazard events, as well as a matrix identifying the ranking of the various hazards that the city could potentially face.

The City of Minnetonka also works with Hennepin County Emergency Management and utilizes ECHO (Emergency, Community, Health and Outreach) and other resources to access emergency communications in various languages. Additionally, the city staff have access to Language Line translation services. Fire, police, and other city departments do a number of annual public presentations specifically targeting the various known population groups in the city.

Lastly, the American Red Cross, in coordination and cooperation with the Salvation Army, Hennepin County Emergency Management, and the City of Minnetonka, maintains a list of emergency shelters and their points-of-contact along with contracts for use. The American Red Cross, with the Salvation Army, handles provisions for the listed shelters, while the city and county provide additional resources and coordination.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
The American Red Cross (in coordination with the Salvation Army), Hennepin County
For more information contact:
Drew Ingvalson (City staff) | dingvalson@eminnetonka.com | 952-939-8293