City Detail

Background Information

City of Moorhead
County: Clay
Population: 42005
GreenStep City category: A
Full-time equivalent city staff (approx.): 250
Participating township, county, school:

GreenStep Coordinator

Dan Mahli
City Staff
218-299-5314
City web page relating to sustainability/GreenStep activities:
GreenStep City resolution: Click here to view the file.
GreenStep City status and date: STEP 3 ( )

City Assessment Files and City Performance Metrics

City councils pass a resolution to join the GreenStep program and are recognized at Step 1. Step 2 and Step 3 recognition levels reflect completed city actions, reported and rated below with stars (1 star = good, 2 stars = better, 3 stars = best). The Assessment File below summarizes completed city actions in a short Word file. Step 4 recognition is awarded to cities who report a minimum number of core metrics for the previous calendar year. These metrics aim to show the aggregate, quantitative results of taking multiple GreenStep actions. Step 5 cities show improvement in the Step 4 metrics. See yearly data for Steps 4&5. Additional city data can be found by reviewing information on B3 Benchmarking and Regional Indicators Initiative.

Assessment File

Best Practice Actions Underway and Completed

Completed actions are denoted by stars.

Total completed actions: 51
1 star actions: 13
2 star actions: 17
3 star actions: 20

Buildings and Lighting Buildings and Lighting

Efficient Existing Public Buildings {BP no.1}

3 star - Action 1:

Enter building information into the Minnesota B3 Benchmarking database and routinely enter monthly energy, water use data for all city-owned buildings.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2019
Implementation details:
We have documented a minimum of 12 consecutive months of historical data into the B3 database for wastewater, drinking water, and energy use for city properties.

Moorhead's Sustainability Manager is responsible for routinely entering data on a monthly basis. Error entry for electricity usage has been avoided by creating an automation process in coordination with Information Technology, which automatically formulates a report in the necessary format directly from Moorhead Public Service Utility Bills.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
Moorhead Public Service
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
1 star - Action 2:

Make no/low cost indoor lighting and operational changes in city-owned/school buildings to reduce energy costs.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2012
Implementation details:
The Hjemkomst Center in Moorhead is home to the Hjemkomst Viking Ship, which is housed by a tent. The building itself is of interesting circumstance; since it houses many artifacts, it is crucial that the temperature and humidity in the building remain constant, ruling out the possibility of a nightly setback. This, in combination with the tent that houses the ship, makes this a relatviely poor-performing building in terms of energy efficiency. A number of upgrades have taken place to reduce energy consumption including more efficient humidifiers and updating the HVAC system from pneumatic controls to digital controls in 2012. Digital controls were installed by TRAIN, with whom the museum has a full-service contract to take care of routine maintenance on the HVAC system. The installation of digital controls allows for better diagnostic tools, and ensures that any problems are caught early. The track lighting for exhibits were transitioned form 90-watt bulbs to CFL lighting, and is now slowly transitioning to LED lighting. The lighting in the museum lobby has been completely replaced with CFL and LED lighting. In June of 2018, variable frequency drives were installed on air handlers that control the air inside of the ship, reducing run-time by approximately 66%.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
Moorhead Parks and Recreation, TRAIN
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
1 star - Action 4:

Implement information technology efforts and city employee engagement to reduce plug loads, building energy use and workflow efficiency.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2011
Implementation details:
Power has been actively managed on all City PC’s (desktops and notebooks) since around 2011. During business hours (between 7:45 a.m. and 4:45 p.m.) approximately half of all PCs, the display turns off after 15 minutes of inactivity and the PC will go to sleep after 45 minutes of inactivity. These settings are enforced and cannot be changed by staff. PCs that are not on this power plan are those that are a part of emergency services or are left on due to staff complaints. Backlights on desk phones are disabled after 60 minutes, decreasing energy usage from about 5.6 W to 3.6 W (1.5-2W per phone). This feature also saves roughly 15% of the power load on network infrastructure equipment.

Although we do not enforce any power plans on infrastructure equipment outside of business hours aside from the backlight timeout on desk phones (due to 24x7 support for Fire, Police, and Public Services), we do have a number of other information technology energy saving efforts going on wherever they are feasible. Server virtualization is used for 88 out of 101 servers. Additionally, blade servers are used to save 30% of electrical use and subsequently 30% of cooling. As much as possible, IT has been moving from 110V power to 220V power – most high power equipment is located in two server rooms that run almost entirely on 220V.

In addition, IT has identified a number of areas that currently are energy inefficient, and will take steps to mediate these problems as it becomes feasible. No education/encouragement on electrical consumption of IT or other equipment currently exists in the SafePersonnel training system, and it is possible that a custom course could be developed on the topic in the near future.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314

Efficient Existing Private Buildings {BP no.2}

1 star - Action 1:

Create or participate in a marketing/outreach/incentive program to promote/achieve residential energy/water use reduction and energy efficiency.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Bright Ideas
The Bright Ideas e-newsletter offers energy-saving tips, hints, and other timely information about energy efficiency. The free Bright Ideas e-newsletter is distributed monthly. Bright Ideas includes:

• eNewsletter – An email newsletter filled with energy saving tips and tools covering topics such as low-cost or no-cost ways to reduce home energy use and the latest in energy technologies and green initiatives.
• eLibrary – Keyword search hundreds of articles and resources on topics ranging from energy efficiency and green power, to the latest in emerging technologies.
• Tools – Home energy audit tools, along with HVAC and appliance calculators to assess your home’s energy use and identify energy saving opportunities.

Neighborhood Impact Program
The Neighborhood Impact Program encourages the preservation of the City’s existing housing stock. The program, via a partnership between the City of Moorhead and Gate City Bank, offers low-interest loans and technical assistance to homeowners for major home improvements, including weatherization and energy efficiency improvements.

Duel-Fuel
For households use electricity as the primary heating source, the dual-fuel program is offered. Dual-Fuel customers use electricity as the primary source of heat. Propane, oil, natural gas, or storage heat can be used as the back-up heat source. Each dual-fuel customer is furnished with a radio receiver. With the receiver, MPS can switch the home from electric heat to back-up sources during peak periods when demand for electricity is highest. Dual-fuel customers save 50% off the regular retail rate on all of the electricity that the electric heating system uses. MPS also offers low interest loans and rebates to qualifying residential dual-fuel customers to help finance upgrades heating systems.

Thrifty Watts
Thrifty Watts is a residential load management program offered by the municipal utility. Thrifty Watts allows Moorhead Public Service to cycle the central air conditioner and electric water heater on and off during periods of high electric usage in return for a credit applied to the monthly utility bill. There is no cost and property owners do not need to supply or purchase special equipment. By allowing a cycle of approximately 12 minutes on/ 12 minutes off during peak energy usage times, utility bills are credited $9/month during summer months (June, July, and August). For an additional credit of $3/month year-round, MPS will turn off electric water heaters for up to 4 hours/control period. Last year, the Thrifty Watts Program was fully subscribed.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
Moorhead Public Service & Missouri Valley Energy Services
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
2 star - Action 6:

Provide a financial or other incentive to private parties who add energy/sustainability improvements, meet the SB 2030 energy standard, or renovate using a green building or energy framework.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Bright Energy Solutions
Bright Energy Solutions is an incentive program through rebates that help reduce electric costs and increase efficiently. Once energy efficient equipment/energy smart products are installed, residents and property owners enjoy energy savings through cash incentives offered by Moorhead Public Service.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
Moorhead Public Service & Missouri Valley Energy Services
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314

Efficient Outdoor Lighting and Signals {BP no.4}

1 star - Action 5:

Use LED/solar-powered lighting for a flashing sign or in a street, parking lot or park project.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
City-owned parking lot lights and park lights are routinely replaced with LED when the head need to be replaced.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
3 star - Action 7:

Replace city-owned parking lot/ramp lighting with Dark-Sky compliant, energy efficient, automatic dimming lighting technologies.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The project to replace the City's parking ramp lights was completed in 2016. In 2015, the exterior stairwell lights were replaced with LEDs, and the interior lights were replaced with LEDs in 2015-16.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314

Land Use Land Use

Comprehensive, Climate and Energy Plans {BP no.6}

2 star - Action 1:

Adopt a comprehensive plan or (for Category B & C cities) adopt a future land use plan that was adopted by the county or a regional entity.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of Moorhead updated its Comprehensive Plan in 2009. Infrastructure is addressed and Growth Management is a noted strategic initiative. In 2016, Moorhead updated its Growth Area Plan.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
1 star - Action 2:

Demonstrate that regulatory ordinances comply with the comprehensive plan including but not limited to having the zoning ordinance explicitly reference the comprehensive plan as the foundational document for decision making.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
10-1-4 of the Moorhead City Code states: "The council recognizes the city comprehensive plan as the policy for regulating land use and development in accordance with the policies and purpose herein set forth."
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
3 star - Action 3:

Include requirements in comprehensive and/or other plans for intergovernmental coordination addressing regional land use and watershed / wellhead impacts, infrastructure, transportation, economic development and city/regional services.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Moorhead is a member of Fargo-Moorhead Metropolitan Council of Governments (Metro COG); partner agency of Greater Fargo Moorhead Economic Development Corporation; and has other coordination efforts with Clay County. Page 64 of the 2009 Comprehensive Plan Addendum notes “Growth Management also occurs with the City’s collaborative efforts with surrounding Townships, Metro COG, Clay County and the adjacent City of Dilworth to plan for future land use, infrastructure systems, parks and open space, and jurisdictional boundary adjustments and agreements.”
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
3 star - Action 4:

Include ecological provisions in the comprehensive plan that explicitly aim to minimize open space fragmentation and/or establish a growth area with expansion criteria.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City's attached 2009 Comprehensive Plan Addendum contains Growth Management as a Strategic Initiative. It starts on page 64 and continues on page 103.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314

Mixed Uses {BP no.8}

3 star - Action 1:

Organize or participate in a community planning/design process for the city/a mixed use district.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Downtown Moorhead Master Plan
In Progress: 4 phase, 12 month plan, approved by the Moorhead EDA on 4/1/2019
The purpose of the expected outcomes of the plan are:
· Broad public engagement to gain community support
· Identifying priorities and strategic opportunities to encourage appropriate development, improve underutilized space, and activate civic assets to their highest and best uses
· Identifying best practices for continued efforts to make Downtown Moorhead a more livable, walkable and thriving urban center
· Driving investment opportunities to Downtown Moorhead and maximizing on the return of public and private investments
· Integrating and synchronizing the aesthetics and amenities of both public and private investments in Downtown Moorhead
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
2 star - Action 2:

Locate or lease a school, city building or other government facility that has at least two of these attributes:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
MATBUS offers discounted passes for students, the elderly, and the disabled and free passes for college students, personal care attendants, and service-connected veterans. There are a number of city facilities located on the MATBUS route including Hopkins Elementary, Moorhead Public Library, the Courthouse, Moorhead Center Mall and City Hall. Most of these facilities are located in or near the Downtown mixed-use district. The purpose of this district is to promote a variety of uses aimed at building and maintain a pedestrian and bicycle friendly, sustainable downtown environment. Uses that provide a diversity of jobs, residential opportunities, entertainment venues, civic functions, commercial services and shopping are encouraged in the downtown mixed-use district. The district will encourage a scale of development, mixture of uses and other such urban design attributes that promote the safe and efficient pedestrian and vehicular movements throughout the district. (Ord. 2004-40, 1-3-2005)
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
MATBUS
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
3 star - Action 5:

Have a downtown zoning district that allows residential and compatible commercial development.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The MU-1 downtown mixed use district promotes a variety of uses aimed at building and maintaining a pedestrian friendly, sustainable downtown environment. Uses that provide a diversity of jobs, residential opportunities, entertainment venues, civic functions, commercial services and shopping are encouraged in the downtown mixed use district. (Ord. 2004-40, 1-3-2005)

Moorhead Renaissance Zone (MRZ) and the Downtown Moorhead Master Plan (In Progress) guide Moorhead's visions and policies for a mixed-use downtown zoning district. Applicable projects are eligible for building improvement tax exemptions.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
2 star - Action 7:

Create incentives for vertical mixed-use development in appropriate locations (downtown, commercial districts near colleges or universities, historic commercial districts).

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2018
Implementation details:
The City has adopted the Moorhead Renaissance Zone (MRZ) which targets urban development, infill, and redevelopment of commercial or residential properties within the zone to concentrate renewal, reinvestment, and redevelopment in Moorhead's downtown, near downtown, and transitional areas. Applicable projects are eligible for building improvement tax exemptions.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314

Transportation Transportation

Living Streets {BP no.11}

2 star - Action 1:

Adopt a complete streets policy, or a living streets policy, which addresses landscaping and stormwater.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Updated Policy considerations from 2004 in 2010. Multi-Modal connections and complete streets aimed at making Moorhead accessible via all modes of transportation including bikes, pedestrians, transit, and individuals of all age ranges.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
2 star - Action 4:

Identify, prioritize and remedy complete streets gaps and lack of connectivity/safety within your road network by, for example, adding a bike route/lane, truck route, sidewalk or mid-block alley.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2016
Implementation details:
The MetroCOG Bicycle and Pedestrian Committee created a plan in 2016 to remedy gaps and insufficiencies in the bike and pedestrian network. In 2019, the city of Moorhead will remedy one of these gaps with a complete streets project on Center Avenue. This project will improve safety for all modes of transportation and will improve the aesthetics of the corridor. It will also increase connectivity and provide a route for riders from Fargo and the Red River trails to Highway 75 in Moorhead. The 2016 plan includes other projects that will remedy gaps in the future in Table 6.3 in the attached PDF.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File: view file
MetroCOG
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
3 star - Action 5:

Identify and remedy street-trail gaps between city streets and off-road trails/bike trails to better facilitate walking and biking.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2018
Implementation details:
In 2016, FM Metro Council of Governments created a Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan. This plan (attached as a descriptive file) is a sub-element of the Long Range Transportation Plan and is updated every 5 years. The purpose of the plan is to identify current issues and needs as they relate to bicycling and pedestrian movements in the area; develop goals, objectives, and recommendations to enhance bicycle and pedestrian accommodations and safety for all types of users regardless of age, gender, race, social status, or mobility needs. On table 4.3 in the plan, they identified gaps in the network of bike and pedestrian transportation. In table 6.3, they have short-term and long-term plans to connect trails using bike lanes, shared use paths, sharrows, signed roadways, bridges, and underpasses. Currently, they have replaced an existing bridge with a new automated lift bridge going from Oak Grove to Memorial Park which has an exclusive bike and pedestrian use. The bridge will connect bicycle and pedestrian traffic between Fargo and Moorhead Downtown areas.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Evaluation of the plan’s success will be measured through manual and automated bicycle and pedestrian counts as well as maintenance of pedestrian and bicycle crash data, results of which will be updated every five years.
Descriptive File: view file
Fargo-Moorhead Metropolitan Council of Governments; Metropolitan Bicycle and Pedestrian Committee
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
2 star - Action 6:

Implement traffic calming policy/measures, including lane conversions (road diets), roundabouts, shared space and depaving, in at least one street redevelopment project.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of Moorhead has adopted a traffic calming policy.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314

Mobility Options {BP no.12}

3 star - Action 1:

Increase walking, biking and transit use by one or more of the following means:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of Moorhead in cooperation with the City of Fargo, ND, operates the MATBUS public transportation system in the metro area. MATBUS produces printed route maps of the jurisdiction boundaries with each bus route shown in color, along with common destinations. MATBUS recently introduced a newly revised website. The website contains individual maps for each route, along with timetables and any applicable detours. Passengers can plan their trips, see their buses in real time at specific bus stops, watch a “How to Ride” video and much more.

All of the MATBUS fixed route buses have bike racks on the front that can accommodate up to three bikes. In addition, the main transit center has a bike docking station to allow multi-modal transportation from bike to bus. The docking station is coordinated with Great Rides Bike Share and discounted prices are available to encourage use of both bike and bus in tandem. Bike racks are also available at a number of key passenger shelters or transfer hubs.

Specially designed MATBUS stop signs are placed at all designated bus stop locations along the bus routes. There are over 250 signs, which contain both phone number and web address to assist passengers. Moorhead has 31 passenger shelters located along routes and each shelter has an interior bench, with many also having exterior benches and bike racks. The shelters each have a display case with a printed map and specific information on scheduled stops at that location. There are depot monitors or kiosks located at two of the college bus stops (MSUM and M|State) that show passengers when buses are scheduled to arrive in real time. MATBUS has an app available through Apple and Google Play that displays real time arrival of buses along routes and at specific bus stops. MATBUS also works with Google Maps to provide directions on how to get to and from locations on the bus. Moorhead sponsors a Park and Ride lot at the Moorhead Center Mall, where commuters can hop on the LinkFM downtown shuttle to access Moorhead and Fargo downtown businesses, as well as the MATBUS Transfer Center.

MATBUS works with Sanford Health, a major employer for the metro area, to offer a discounted 30-day bus pass to employees. Currently, 122 Sanford employees utilize MATBUS through this program. In addition, to encourage participation by employers, a new pilot program offering a Downtown Pass at a discount price was introduced in February 2017. The Downtown Pass is only available through employers in the downtown zone and 90 passes have been sold.

The entire FM metro area, including Moorhead, has received the BRONZE Bicycle Friendly Community designation.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
3 star - Action 2:

Conduct an Active Living campaign such as a Safe Routes to School program.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of Moorhead participates in Streets Alive, which is an Active Living campaign, held in the community to encourage people to enjoy and adopt more physically active lifestyles. These fun open-street festivals plant the idea that people walking or biking to work or play is normal and exhilarating. Over 8,000 people attended the 2017 Streets Alive events.

The City of Moorhead is continuing its efforts to improve the safety of students who walk or bicycle to all of its elementary and middle schools through an update of its citywide Safe Routes to School (SRTS) plan. This plan is a guiding document for pedestrian and bicycle infrastructure, policies, and programs around schools in the city. Through implementation of this plan, the city aims to enhance the safety and comfort of residents when walking or bicycling to and from schools.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
2 star - Action 3:

Prominently identify mobility options: transit; paratransit/Dial-A-Ride; ridesharing/cab services; rental cars; bikes; airports.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of Moorhead MATBUS web page contains information on programs such as public transit, paratransit service for persons with disabilities and senior citizens, as well as information on other private and public transportation services and our transportation partners.

MATBUS produces a brochure and supporting website, FMRIDESOURCE.com, for the metro area of Fargo and West Fargo, North Dakota and Moorhead and Dilworth, Minnesota regarding transportation options for people with disabilities and those over age 60. As a regional medical center and hub of human services, the Fargo-Moorhead metro area strives to accommodate the mobility needs of its residents. All of the transportation options on this website, including private transportation providers and government-supported transit, are available to the public.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
3 star - Action 4:

Promote carpooling or ridesharing among community members, city employees, businesses, high schools and institutions of higher education.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of Moorhead and MATBUS promote commuting to work and school through transit, biking, walking, and carpooling through an annual promotion called the iGoEco Challenge. This promotion is based on the Minnesota State-wide campaign entitled the Commuter Challenge. Residents are encouraged to leave their car at home and take alternative transportation at least once per week. This five-week promotion is held in the spring and weekly prize drawings are held for those who complete the challenge. Area businesses provide the prizes and encourage their employees to participate. The promotion was first launched in 2011 and nearly 400 people participate each year.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
3 star - Action 6:

Add/expand transit service, or promote car/bike sharing.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
MATBUS and Great Rides Bike Share are working on a Bike and Bus Multi-pass to be introduced in Spring 2018. This pass would create a seamless transition for passengers between MATBUS and Great Rides. Passengers would be able to purchase a pass and utilize both means of transportation for one low cost. Since Great Rides has a limited window of operation each year, this pass would be available from mid-April through mid-September ensuring bikes are available for anyone utilizing this pass.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314

Environmental Management Environmental Management

Sustainable Purchasing {BP no.15}

1 star - Action 1:

Adopt a sustainable purchasing policy or administrative guidelines/practices directing that the city purchase at least:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2019
Implementation details:
The City's purchasing policy encourages city employees to make every effort to implement sustainable purchasing by:
· Conserving natural resources (i.e. water and energy use)
· Reducing the use of harmful toxins that produce hazards to the community
· Supporting and encouraging community-wide green practices and purchases
· Purchasing environmentally preferable products
· Minimizing waste generated by City operations
· Supporting strong recycling markets
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
2 star - Action 2:

Purchase energy used by city government - via the municipal utility, green tags, community solar garden, 3rd party - with a higher renewable percentage than required by Minnesota law.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
City of Moorhead currently purchases its energy through Moorhead Public Service, whose power mix consists of 50% hydropower, 4% wind, 4% nuclear, >1% solar. Attached is a graph showing Moorhead's power supply mix, which is roughly 59% renewable energy, exceeding that which is required by state law.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File: view file
Moorhead Public Service
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314

Community Forests and Soils {BP no.16}

2 star - Action 1:

Certify as a Tree City USA.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
2018 will be the City's 30th year as a Tree City USA. The City's Forestry program is funded through an enterprise fund and every household pays $4.18/month. The 2018 dedicated budget for Forestry is $880,000.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
3 star - Action 4:

Maximize tree planting along your main downtown street or throughout the city.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
In 2012, the Moorhead City Council determined the Forestry Department would plant the boulevard trees in new developments rather than having developers plant the trees and include it in the special assessment for the property. Since implementing the new policy, Forestry has increased the average number of trees planted from 411 to 709 trees planted per year.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
2 star - Action 5:

Adopt a tree preservation or native landscaping ordinance.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
In coordination with River Keepers and the Audubon Society, the City has implemented several urban woodland prairie initiatives along the river corridor. The attached file contains the most recent 2017 legacy grant and the map shows all the urban woodland prairie areas. Additionally, the City plants 800-1600 whips in the river corridor area annually with River Keepers so the river corridor serves as a tree preservation.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314

Stormwater Management {BP no.17}

1 star - Action 1:

Adopt and use Minnesota's Minimal Impact Design Standards (MIDS).

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City accepts MIDS to meet city ordinance requirements, but we have not adopted their practices.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
Not rated - Action 3:

Adopt by ordinance one or more of the following stormwater infiltration/management strategies:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City has a minimum 26’ curb to curb.
We do not require sites less than 1 acre to meet the water quality volume of 1.1 inches.
We are an MS4.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
1 star - Action 4:

Create a stormwater utility that uses variable fees to incentivize stormwater infiltration, minimize the volume of and pollutants in runoff, and educate property owners.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
We have a storm water utility fee.
We do not have a fee reduction program.
The residential fee is a flat rate of $10.21
The commercial fee is variable and is based off the amount of impervious area divided by the average residential impervious area. When you get a base unit it is multiplied by $10.21
Some of the storm water fee is used for flood mitigation.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
1 star - Action 5:

Adopt and implement guidelines or design standards/incentives for at least one of the following stormwater infiltration/reuse practices:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
We do not have incentive. But the City is working on guidelines for boulevard plantings and boulevard rain gardens. The rain gardens have to be designed by a Professional Engineer or Landscape Architect.
River Keepers puts on the rain barrel classes – the City uses them for our MS4 Public Education and Outreach program
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314

Parks and Trails {BP no.18}

3 star - Action 1:

Make improvements within your city's system of parks, offroad trails and open spaces.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The Moorhead River Corridor Trail Master Plan (descriptive file) is an $18 million, 25+ year plan to acquire flood prone property adjacent to the Red River to be converted to public use lands. This land will create an attractive community destination that promotes conservation, recreation, and trail connectivity.
Moorhead High School, Ellen Hopkins Elementary School, and Horizon Middle School all offer use of outdoor tracks after school hours.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File: view file
See descriptive weblink for all involved parties and corresponding contributions
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
2 star - Action 2:

Plan and budget for a network of parks, green spaces, water features and trails for areas where new development is planned.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
11-5-15: PARK LAND DEDICATION REQUIREMENTS:

A. General Requirements: Because new residential development increases the population of the community and demand on the parks system, as a prerequisite to residential plat approval and at the sole determination by the city, applicants must dedicate land for parks, playgrounds, public open spaces, trails or bikeways and/or must make a cash dedication to the city.

1. Park land and open space dedication shall be considered in relation to the city comprehensive plan, growth area plans and parks master plan, should such planning documents exist at the time of plat, or is as determined to be in the best interest of the city.

2. Where private open space for park and recreation purposes is provided in a proposed subdivision, such areas may be used for credit, at the discretion of the city, against the requirement of dedication for park and recreation purposes provided, the city finds it is in the public interest to do so.

3. The city may elect at its sole discretion to receive a combination of cash and land dedication.

4. During preliminary plat submission the applicant must provide the city with the number and type of residential units which will occupy the platted area. If during development the number or type of units are altered, the applicant will be required to make a cash dedication to account for the increased density of the project. However, if the number of units are decreased, the applicant will not be refunded that amount of cash or land dedicated during original plat approval.

5. Property being replatted with the same number of units will be exempt from all park land dedication requirements. If the number of units is increased or if land outside the previously recorded plat is added, then the park land dedication and/or park cash contributions will be based on the additional units added to the plat.

B. Park Land Dedication: In all new residential subdivisions, land must be dedicated for public recreation use or open space as established by the city council. The dedicated land must be in addition to property dedicated for streets, alleys, easements, water detention or other public ways unless otherwise provided herein. The amount of land dedicated will be based on the type of development according to the following:


Type Of Dwelling Unit Minimum Area
Dedicated Per Dwelling Unit
Single or two-family 929 square feet
Multiple-family 669 square feet

1. Land to be dedicated must be reasonably suitable for its intended use as determined by the city and must be at a location convenient to the public to be served. Factors used in evaluating the adequacy of proposed park and recreation areas must include size, shape, topography, geology, hydrology, tree cover, access and location.

2. When land is dedicated and deeded to the city for park purposes, it will be the responsibility of the city to maintain such dedicated property.

3. Land dedication to the city must be in the form of outlots.

4. The preliminary plat must show the location and dimensions of all areas to be dedicated in this manner.

5. When a proposed park, playground, recreational area, or other public ground has been indicated on the city's official map, within the comprehensive plan, growth area plan, or park master plan and is located in whole or in part within a proposed plat, it must be dedicated to the appropriate governmental unit, at the sole discretion of the city.

6. Land area conveyed or dedicated to the city will be used in calculating allowable density per the city zoning ordinance.

7. Wetlands, ponding areas and drainageways accepted by the city may not be considered in the park land and/or cash contribution to the city, where such areas have been determined to have a park function, as approved by the city council.

C. Payment In Lieu Of Dedication: When, in the opinion of the city and at its sole discretion, it is impractical, inappropriate, and/or in the best interest of the city for a subdivision to not make a dedication of land for public use or make only a partial dedication of land, the applicant will be required to pay a cash fee based on the type and number of dwelling units. The in lieu amount shall be based on the average fair market value of land at the time of plat without public improvement, as determined by the city assessor and as approved annually by the city council.

1. Park cash contributions are to be calculated and paid in full at the time of final plat approval.

2. Cash contributions for parks and trails will be deposited in either the city's park fund or similar fund and will only be used for acquisition and development of future parks and trails or development of existing sites as determined by the city. Additionally, to the extent possible, said funds should be utilized in a timely manner within a benefiting area to the development, or within a regional park facility.

D. Purchase And Assessment Of Park Land: The requirement for park land dedication or payment in lieu of dedication may be waived by the city when an agreement incorporated into a developer's agreement has been executed between the city and developer. Such agreement must require the developer to petition for park improvements to be assessed against the property owned by the developer, which may include property outside the current plat. The agreement must set forth the land to be purchased by the city for park purposes and the purchase price for the land. In addition, the agreement must set forth the general type of improvements to be included in the petition for park improvements, as well as the maximum amount of money that may be assessed. Such maximum amount may be based on a sliding scale based on the density of the development. The city may enter into such an agreement only if the city council determines that such an agreement results in a more favorable result to the city than the imposition of the standard park land dedication or payment in lieu of dedication requirements. (Ord. 2004-41, 1-3-2005)

11-5-8: SIDEWALKS:linklink


A. All new subdivisions within the city shall provide sidewalks on both sides of all arterial, collector, local and cul-de-sac street(s). A developer, in connection with the platting of a new subdivision or replatting a subdivision, shall submit a sidewalk plan for approval by the planning commission and city council, which plan shall be incorporated into a developer's agreement for that plat.

A sidewalk plan may be submitted by the developer which illustrates the placement of sidewalks on one side of a street or areas with no sidewalks. Factors that the planning commission and city council shall consider include, but are not limited to:

1. The expected population density of the area;

2. The location of pedestrian traffic generators within walking distance;

3. The relationship of the subdivision to adjacent existing and projected land uses;

4. Design of the subdivision for which sidewalks are required; and

5. Existing and/or planned sidewalk connections adjacent to the subdivision. (Ord. 2012-10, 5-29-2012)

B. All sidewalks proposed for a subdivision must conform to the standards outlined in section 11-6-3 of this title. (Ord. 2004-41, 1-3-2005; amd. Ord. 2012-10, 5-29-2012)
11-5-9: BIKE PATHS:linklink


A. Bike paths will be required for those subdivisions within the city where such need has been identified within the metropolitan bicycle and pedestrian plan or within an applicable growth area plan. (Ord. 2004-41, 1-3-2005)
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
2 star - Action 3:

Achieve minimum levels of city green space and maximize the percent within a ten-minute walk of community members.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
64 total parks, with 740 acres of park land.
79% of residents within a 10 min walk to a public park, and 77% of youth.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
3 star - Action 8:

Develop a program to involve community members in hands-on land restoration and stewardship projects.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
We have adopt a park options - http://www.ci.moorhead.mn.us/departments/parks-recreation/volunteering
And work with Riverkeepers (river trash cleanup) and Audubon Dakota (invasive species removal)
Organized interstate trash cleanup events in the past. Not really ‘city wide’, but Louis Ochoa in the Police Department does a lot of trash pick up with the community service program.

Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
Riverkeepers; Audubon Dakota
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314

Sustainable Consumption and Waste {BP no.22}

1 star - Action 2:

Address concerns over consumer products and packaging through encouragement/implementation of one or more of:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
On November 15th, 2017, the City's A Day Without a Bag Campaign promoted reusable bags as well as highlighted where plastic grocery bags can be recycled at Cash Wise Foods in Moorhead.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
3 star - Action 6:

Improve recycling services and expand to multi-unit housing and commercial businesses.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2019
Implementation details:
The City provides no-sort recycling services at 163 apartments. Recycling education posters have been placed on containers to reduce garbage contamination. The City has recognized keys to success in apartments: 1) apartment managers who are actively involved, 2) continued education and awareness, and 3) making it more convenient to recycle by improving access to recycling bins. City goal: increase apartment recycling to 20% of total tonnage. It was 10.7% as of 11/20/17.

With the help of a grant from the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency, the City of Moorhead has conducted a six-month Commercial No-Sort Recycling Pilot Program. The City Council will come to a decision in May 2019 about whether to continue this service.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
2 star - Action 7:

Improve/organize residential trash, recycling and organics collection by private and/or public operations and offer significant volume-based pricing on residential garbage and/or incentives for recycling.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City implemented no-sort recycling on July 1st, 2017. As of November 2017, it has increased recycling rates by 56%.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314

Local Air Quality {BP no.23}

2 star - Action 5:

Install, assist with and promote publicly available EV charging stations or public fueling stations for alternative fuel vehicles. 

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2018
Implementation details:
A level 3 DC quick charge station was installed at the intersection of Hwy 75 and Interstate 94 at the Holiday Mall in Moorhead. The project was installed by Zef Energy as part of the Michigan to Montana I-94 Clean Fuel Corridor, which provides drivers with alternative fuel sources across a 1,500 mile stretch between Port Huron, MI, and Billings, MT. Funding was provided by a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy, as well as by Moorhead Public Service and Missouri River Energy Services.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
Zef Energy, U.S. Department of Energy, Missouri River Energy Services, Moorhead Public Service
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314

Resilient Economic & Community Development Resilient Economic and Community Development

Benchmarks and Community Engagement {BP no.24}

1 star - Action 1:

Use a city commission, or committee to lead, coordinate, and report to and engage community members on implementation of sustainability best practices.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The following staff members have participated in gathering data and developing the next steps to take in the city's sustainable initiatives:

Lisa Bode, Kristie Leshovsky, Kim Citrowske -- Neighborhood Services

Steve Moore, Maggie Gruber (Recycling) -- Public Works

Bob Zimmerman, Jonathan Atkins (Transportation), Maria Amundson (Wastewater) -- Engineering

Lori Van Beek, Taaren Haak -- MATBUS

Holly Heitkamp -- Parks and Rec

Bill Schwandt, Dennis Eisenbraun -- MPS (Water & Electric)

Alex Johnson, Dan Mahli -- City Manager's Office
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
1 star - Action 2:

Organize goals/outcome measures from all city plans and report to community members data that show progress toward meeting these goals.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
A "Sustainability: Reduce, ReUse, Rec" tab on our City's website. This includes links to any sustainable practices the city performs and directs community members to additional information about any of the city's past or ongoing projects related to sustainability.

We have also held several community meetings that go into detail about the City's future plans or current initiatives.

The Minnesota Environmental Review Board also come annually to visit Moorhead and view our sustainability projects.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
1 star - Action 5:

Conduct or support a community education, visioning and planning initiative using a sustainability framework such as:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2018
Implementation details:
The City of Moorhead co-hosted a film screening of “The Power of Minnesota,” which detailed how clean energy is strengthening local economies throughout the state, in partnership with NDSU Extension, Prairie Public, Clean Energy Resource Teams, and University of Minnesota extension. Dan Mahli presented a GreenStep Cities Update, followed by Dennis Eisenbraun from Moorhead Public Service to update the community on the local, ongoing renewable energy and conservation efforts in the City of Moorhead.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File: view file
NDSU Extension, University of Minnesota Extension, Clean Energy Resource Teams
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314

Green Business Development {BP no.25}

3 star - Action 3:

Promote sustainable tourism in your city, and green tourism resources to tourism and hospitality businesses in/around the city.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 1990
Implementation details:
River Keepers work with Moorhead Parks and Recreation to offer canoeing, kayaking, and fishing. They also offer many educational events like the Red River Paddling Excursion to teach users how to appreciate and be a steward of the Red River. They also have many volunteering offerings like On-The Water-Clean up and Adopt the Red. A list of their many activities is on their website. These activities promote sustainable use of the river and provide a green tourism offering for the city. Their Board of Directors is made up of many members from organizations and businesses in the Fargo-Moorhead area.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File: view file
River Keepers, Moorhead Parks and Recreation
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
2 star - Action 4:

Strengthen value-added businesses utilizing local "waste" material.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Dakota Timber Co. partners with the city to reclaim timber. They create local waste material into a valuable product in our local economy when they sell to builders, contractors, and home owners. Dakota Timber Co. strives to be sustainable, affordable, and high quality.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
Dakota Timber Co.
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
3 star - Action 5:

Lower the environmental and health risk footprint of a brownfield remediation/redevelopment project beyond regulatory requirements; report brightfield projects.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2004
Implementation details:
Over the past decade, Moorhead has invested millions of dollars in downtown physical improvements as part of its downtown revitalization efforts. Many of the properties acquired were mildly to severely contaminated due to a wide variety of historical land use. In 2004, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (USEPA) Brownfield Program awarded the City $400,000 Assessment Grant to provide 100% financing for Environmental Site assessments within an area defined as the Central City Corridor. This includes all areas of First Avenue, Center Avenue, Main Avenue and The 4th Street Gateway entrance area.
The attached supporting document provides a brief summary that highlights Brownfield sites in Moorhead where the City has gone above and beyond to remediate sites which became extremely successful redevelopment projects. For each property, it includes site history and contamination, corresponding remediation efforts and financing, and the resulting redevelopment project and its associated impacts on the City.
Moorhead’s redevelopment efforts and Brownfield Remediation projects are intertwined, making a unique situation in which to turn contaminated sites into new, mixed-use properties that fit within Fargo-Moorhead’s Downtown Redevelopment Framework Plan, and that help Moorhead achieve it’s Downtown Housing Goal.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File: view file
MetroCOG, USEPA
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314

Renewable Energy {BP no.26}

3 star - Action 4:

Support a community solar garden or help community members participate in a community renewable energy project by:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Capture The Sun® is the program at Moorhead Public Service (MPS) that is associated with MPS’ Community Solar Garden Projects.

A “community solar garden” is a collection of solar panels shared with customers who are unable to install and maintain a solar panel system of their own, such as customers with shaded roofs and those who have structures not suitable for solar panels.

MPS' Community Solar Garden is located between MPS’ two Capture The Wind® turbines in north Moorhead.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314
3 star - Action 5:

Install a public sector/municipally-owned renewable energy technology, such as solar electric (PV), wind, biomass, solar hot water/air, or micro-hydro.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Capture the Energy is an award winning renewable energy program that was developed by Moorhead Public Service to promote all forms of renewable energy. Capture the Energy programs include:

1) Wind Turbines: Each wind turbine (2 – Zepher and Freedom) are rated at 750 kilowatts (kW) and produce approximately 1,500,000 kilowatthours (kWh) of energy per year. Generation of electricity starts at a wind speed of 8 mph.

2) Solar Demonstration Project: The solar photovoltaic (PV) modules convert sunlight directly into electricity. The electricity is converted from direct current electricity (DC) to alternating current (AC) electricity and is then injected into the electrical distribution grid. Solar PV Modules (Size 3’x5’/Rated at .220 kW). Solar Arrays (Size 12’x20’, Rated at 3.52 kW)- Vertical and horizontal [dual axis] tracking capability, 16 solar PV modules per solar array, Total generation of all three arrays equals 10.56 kW, designed to withstand 90 mph winds and one-inch hail.


The Capture the Energy Participant program allows residents and businesses to contribute financially to support wind and solar energy to examine, educate, and promote other viable renewable energy technologies locally.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314

Business Synergies and EcoDistricts {BP no.28}

2 star - Action 2:

Document that at least one business/building uses waste heat or water discharge from another business or conducts materials exchange activities with another organization.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City's Wastewater Treatment Plant generates methane as part of the water treatment process. The methane gas is captured and returned to the boiler to heat the entire facility, including the tanks where methane is formed.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314

Climate Adaptation and Community Resilience {BP no.29}

3 star - Action 1:

Prepare to maintain public health and safety during extreme weather and climate-change-related events, while also taking a preventive approach to reduce risk for community members.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of Moorhead rewrites the Hazard Mitigation Plan every fifth year, and reviews and updates it yearly. The state of Minnesota and FEMA verify the plan. In 2019, the city will update its Emergency Operation Plan to be congruent with the county. City and county staff are prepared in the case of emergency to distribute provided resources. Mutual aid agreements exist for emergency medical and fire services for both Cass and Clay counties.

The Moorhead Fire Department provides a metro-wide ‘Are you Prepared?’ manual in multiple languages and takes part in Emergency and Community Health Outreach (ECHO) to provide information and assistance in multiple languages. Translators are open to these populations via the Language Line, which can be accessed over the phone during an emergency. The fire department works with stakeholders such as daycares, nursing homes, long-term care facilities and schools for emergency response.

The city and county provide outreach events at the fire departments for first responders to be prepared and open forums for the community. Outreach events occur in the spring and fall about severe weather and winter weather preparedness [events which are predicted to increase in frequency as a result of climate change]. They also provide large-scale training and exercises for nonprofits and organizations like the Red Cross.

The city utilizes 24-hour open businesses as mercy shelters. They communicate and post to residents in manufactured homes so they know where to go during an emergency. They provide outreach and education events for residents to find safe areas within their own complex. Rally points and designated shelters are divided within each ward and are used to evacuate the city. At each shelter location, the city evaluates its backup generation. Plans are in place to get local resources, then regional resources, and then state resources. The city has outreach and yearly training with the gas utilities and Moorhead Public Service (MPS). MPS also has procedures set in place for emergency preparedness.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Dan Mahli (City staff) | dan.mahli@cityofmoorhead.com | 218-299-5314