City Detail

Background Information

City of New Brighton
County: Ramsey
Population: 22000
GreenStep City category: A
Full-time equivalent city staff (approx.): 110
Participating township, county, school:

GreenStep Coordinator

Craig Schlichting
City Staff
651-638-2056
City web page relating to sustainability/GreenStep activities:
GreenStep City resolution: Click here to view the file.
GreenStep City status and date: STEP 4 ( )

City Assessment Files and City Performance Metrics

City councils pass a resolution to join the GreenStep program and are recognized at Step 1. Step 2 and Step 3 recognition levels reflect completed city actions, reported and rated below with stars (1 star = good, 2 stars = better, 3 stars = best). The Assessment File below summarizes completed city actions in a short Word file. Step 4 recognition is awarded to cities who report a minimum number of core metrics for the previous calendar year. These metrics aim to show the aggregate, quantitative results of taking multiple GreenStep actions. Step 5 cities show improvement in the Step 4 metrics. See yearly data for Steps 4&5. Additional city data can be found by reviewing information on B3 Benchmarking and Regional Indicators Initiative.

Assessment File

Best Practice Actions Underway and Completed

Completed actions are denoted by stars.

Total completed actions: 48
1 star actions: 25
2 star actions: 15
3 star actions: 7

Buildings and Lighting Buildings and Lighting

Efficient Existing Public Buildings {BP no.1}

1 star - Action 1:

Enter building information into the Minnesota B3 Benchmarking database and routinely enter monthly energy, water use data for all city-owned buildings.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
All benchmark data has been entered in the B3 database. We have 2013-2016 meter readings for each building and previous data for 3 of the 4 buildings in the early 2000's. With the gaps in meter readings from 2004-2013 staff is looking to pull data from Xcel and City files to have a longer range of readings/
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
The B3 data will continue to be updated and the benefit any improvements can be tracked. The reduction of energy (gas/electric) will support future lighting, HVAC, and energy wise projects.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056
1 star - Action 2:

Make no/low cost indoor lighting and operational changes in city-owned/school buildings to reduce energy costs.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Restroom facilities at City Hall have been equipped with sensors to turn on when occupied. City Hall HVAC automation has unoccupied set points to throttle heat/cooling back.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056
1 star - Action 3:

Invest in larger energy efficiency projects through performance contracting or other funding or through smaller retro-commissioning/retrofit projects in city-owned/school buildings.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City Initiated Roof Top Unit (RTU) replacement project at the New Brighton Community Center (NBCC) using Trane as a vendor through the US Communities Government Purchasing Alliance. This project is scheduled for completion in September of 2016.

The efficiencies that can be gained by following the Trane recommendations will allow the City to maximize the comfort of the environment for the building’s users while reducing payback time and maximizing control of the building.

Trane completed a study on the performance of the current HVAC system at NBCC by utilizing data logging devices that were installed at various locations inside the building. The data found shows the current RTU’s are not working at optimal levels. This impacts the comfort level of NBCC visitors and doesn’t allow the NBCC to operate at peak efficiency. It is also demanding on the RTU’s as they are forced to work harder to overcompensate for the various swings in temperatures. This results in higher energy bills and potential repair costs. The RTU’s are also not working at optimal levels due to the units being near the end of their useful life.

An absolute necessity to utilizing any new HVAC system to the fullest extent possible is to replace the current pneumatic controls as part of this project. The NBCC’s current outdated pneumatic controls will be replaced with Direct Digital Controls (DDC). DDC will allow greater control in various areas of NBCC.

The City will seal leaks that have been identified in the exterior wall and roof deck connections as well as window and door frame leaks
during the NBCC project to resist infiltration of air, water, heat, light, and noise transfer from exterior to interior, or from interior to exterior

LEDs will replace the current fluorescent and Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFL) used at NBCC. This will reduce the amount of energy necessary to operate NBCC and provide high quality lighting. Based on the longevity of LED bulbs will require less staff time to replace when they have burned out. Another maintenance issue that will be resolved is it will no longer be necessary to replace the ballasts to light fixtures, reducing both the equipment cost and again staff time to perform this task. Currently there are different types of lighting fixture types used at NBCC. This includes LED fixtures that were installed as part of the locker room/restroom renovation project, fluorescent tubes and CFL’s as well as metal halide fixtures that provide exterior lighting at NBCC. There are approximately 2,000 fixtures and lamps that would be retrofitted to LED. New LED's are planned for installation in August-September.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
The new RTU's will provide 15-20 years of energy savings.

Energy use data following the project completion dates will be used to compare to existing B3 database records.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056

Efficient Outdoor Lighting and Signals {BP no.4}

1 star - Action 2:

Purchase LEDs for all future street lighting and traffic signals.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City owns the ornamental street light systems along Silver Lake Road and Old Highway 8. For some of the lights that are unmetered, the City has a maintenance contract with Xcel Energy to service the electrical portion of the lighting system. However, for the lights that are metered the City is responsible for re-lamping, inspection, and maintenance.

The City owns and maintains two street light systems - 95 street lights on Silver Lake Road North and 58 street lights on 5th Avenue NW from 1st Street NW to Old Highway 8. They were originally installed on Silver Lake Road in two phases – 2001 and 2004. The street lights on 5th Avenue NW were installed in 1999. These lights were completely re-lamped in 2008.

The City also owns 30 street lights on Norwest Parkway (NWQ) installed in 2007 and 44 street lights north of I694 along Old Highway 8 installed in 2008, and several lights by Pulte in 2015. The 2007 street lights were due for their first re-lamping in 2015.

All of these lights contain high pressure sodium (HPS) lamps that have an average operating life of 24,000 service hours. On average, 50 percent of the street lights will be burned out or cycling after 6.5 years of operation. During the 2015 Street Rehabilitation project 35 existing luminaires on 10th Street were retrofitted with LED fixtures and 11 new LED lights were installed. To provide for a longer service life, all of the decorative luminaires in the City will eventually be replaced with LED fixtures.

2016 Re-lamp 49 Old Highway 8 Lights north of 5th Avenue
2016 Re-lamp 67 Silver Lake Road Lights south of 694
2018 Re-lamp 58 5th Avenue NW Lights south of Old 8 to 1st Street
2020 Re-lamp 102 Lights North of 694 in the Exchange
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
The ornamental lights are a large investment, and need to be maintained and kept in good working order. LED lights are efficient and will significantly outlast the HPS lamps. LED lights installed on metered systems will have their energy use compared to previous years utility data.
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056
1 star - Action 6:

Relamp/improve exterior building lighting for city-owned buildings/facilities with energy efficient, Dark-Sky compliant lighting.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
All exterior wall pack lighting on the Public Safety Facility (Fire Station) have been replaced with LED. We have also retrofitted have the wash bay, oxygen room, and laundry room with LED's.

Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056
1 star - Action 7:

Replace city-owned parking lot/ramp lighting with Dark-Sky compliant, energy efficient, automatic dimming lighting technologies.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of New Brighton replaced the City Hall parking lot lights with LED retrofits with only down cast lighting. We have also placed these lights on a timer that we manually change with the season to limit use to dawn/dusk.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056
1 star - Action 8:

Replace the city's existing traffic signals with LEDs.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
All of the traffic signals in New Brighton are owned/operated by Ramsey County or MnDOT. During the 2015 Street Reconstruction project, the City led the replacement of a Ramsey County signal with all LED lamps. Additionally the City installed a LED Rectangular Rapid Flash Beacon for a pedestrian crossing.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056

Land Use Land Use

Comprehensive, Climate and Energy Plans {BP no.6}

1 star - Action 1:

Adopt a comprehensive plan or (for Category B & C cities) adopt a future land use plan that was adopted by the county or a regional entity.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of New Brighton adopted its 2030 Comprehensive Plan on November 24, 2009 via Resolution 09-079 following Metropolitan Council approval earlier in 2009. New Brighton’s Plan establishes general objectives and policies in the areas of land use, redevelopment, housing, environmental protection, transportation, community facilities (water and sewer), and parks/open space.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056
1 star - Action 2:

Demonstrate that regulatory ordinances comply with the comprehensive plan including but not limited to having the zoning ordinance explicitly reference the comprehensive plan as the foundational document for decision making.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
(2) Chapter 11 of the City’s Comprehensive Plan states that zoning is the official controls to implementation of the Comprehensive Plan, guiding all decision making in order to protect the general health and welfare of the public. The City has adopted an official Zoning Map and Zoning Code that is consistent with the Comprehensive Plan and which guides land use and development within the City.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056
1 star - Action 3:

Include requirements in comprehensive and/or other plans for intergovernmental coordination addressing regional land use and watershed / wellhead impacts, infrastructure, transportation, economic development and city/regional services.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
(3) New Brighton’s Comprehensive Plan includes requirements for intergovernmental coordination in the areas of land use, watershed impacts, transportation, and housing. New Brighton’s policies include notification of land use impacts to adjacent cities, school districts, and other governmental entities including the Department of Natural Resources and Ramsey County. The City adopted its current Surface Water Management Plan in August 2012, ensuring New Brighton is following and implementing the requirements of the Rice Creek Watershed District. New Brighton’s Comprehensive Plan supports Alternative Travel Modes via five Metro Transit routes and Metro Mobility service. The City of New Brighton also participates in the Metropolitan Council’s Livable Communities program, which aims to support and provide affordable housing.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056
1 star - Action 4:

Include ecological provisions in the comprehensive plan that explicitly aim to minimize open space fragmentation and/or establish a growth area with expansion criteria.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
(4) The City of New Brighton’s Comprehensive Plan includes a chapter on Environmental Protection. This includes an inventory of natural features and patterns throughout the community, including lakes and wetlands, topography, waterways and drainage ditches, natural communities and rare species, tree canopy, and utilization of the Minnesota Land Cover Classification System. Beyond inventory of these areas, the City’s Comprehensive Plan outlines storm water protection programs, including NPDES and MS4, and many public education and outreach programs and initiatives
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056
Pending - Action 5:

Adopt climate mitigation and/or energy independence goals and objectives in the comprehensive plan or in a separate policy document, and include transportation recommendations such as becoming an EV-ready city.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City is just beginning its next cycle of Comprehensive Planning and intends to include additional Comprehensive Plan elements and policies in the areas of sustainability, resiliency and energy independence goals.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056

Resilient City Growth {BP no.7}

2 star - Action 1:

Limit barriers to higher density housing by including in the city zoning ordinance and zoning map:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
(1a) New Brighton’s official Zoning Code/Map includes an R-1A zoning district that allows minimum lot sizes of 5,000 SF, equating to densities in excess of seven units per acre. This zoning district is limited to downtown New Brighton.

(1b)New Brighton’s official Zoning Code/Map includes an R-3A, Multi-Family Residential zoning district that allows densities in excess of 12 units per acre with no maximum. New Brighton’s NBE, New Brighton Exchange zoning district encourages high density residential development with no maximum densities. The View Apartments at Long Lake, within the NBE zoning district, was approved at a density exceeding 30 units per acre.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056
2 star - Action 2:

Achieve higher density housing through at least two of the following strategies:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
(2a) New Brighton has used the Planned Unit Development process in the City’s New Brighton Exchange redevelopment area to encourage higher density housing by allowing flexible minimum lot size and frontage requirements. The Enclave at New Brighton Exchange is the most recent example of implementation of flexible lot size/frontage requirements for infill development.

(2b)New Brighton’s Planned Residential Development ordinance allows a density bonus in all residential districts of up to 150% for any housing serving the elderly. New Brighton’s B-4, Downtown Business district, which permits residential uses, does not provide any maximum density or floor area ratio limitations.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056
2 star - Action 3:

Achieve higher intensity commercial/industrial land uses through at least one of the following strategies:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
(3a) New Brighton’s B-2 and B-3, Neighborhood Business and General Business zoning districts provide for zero-lot-line setbacks in the side yard abutting other business-zoned districts. Further, New Brighton’s B-3, General Business zoning district provides for a floor area ratio of 1.0.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056
1 star - Action 4:

Provide incentives for infill projects, or for life-cycle housing at or near job or retail centers, or for achieving an average net residential density of seven units per acre.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
New Brighton utilizes Tax Increment Financing for projects that include, but are not limited to, the creation or retention of jobs, to overcome brownfield site challenges and prepare them for redevelopment, to achieve housing and/or commercial/industrial uses that are desired and/or lacking within the community, reduction of blight, neighborhood revitalization, and redevelopment goals that are recognized within the Comprehensive Plan. Since establishment of TIF by the Minnesota Legislature, New Brighton has created 33 TIF districts.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056
2 star - Action 5:

Use design to create social trust and interaction among neighbors: modify the city zoning ordinance and zoning map to allow, without variance or rezoning in at least one district, developments that meet the prerequisites for LEED for Neighborhood Development certification.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
(5) New Brighton’s NBE, New Brighton Exchange zoning district encourages storm water management and conservation development design and/or ecological storm water management techniques and resource efficient building practices, including energy efficiency, water stewardship, waste reduction, use of recycling and non-toxic building materials, and recovery of waste materials through recycling or other beneficial use.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056

Mixed Uses {BP no.8}

2 star - Action 1:

Organize or participate in a community planning/placemaking/design process for the city/a mixed use district.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
(1) The City of New Brighton has organized and participated in various community planning and design processes that have yielded desires for mixed use ordinances and developments, most notable the New Brighton Exchange redevelopment area. These studies are known as the Old Highway 8 Corridor Study and a Vision for the Heart of New Brighton. New Brighton’s Planning Commission reviews all community planning items and provides recommendations to the City Council.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056
2 star - Action 2:

Locate or lease a school, city building or other government facility that has at least two of these attributes:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
(2a) The City of New Brighton leases space within the New Brighton Community Center to the Ramsey County Public Library and space within City Hall to the Minnesota Police Chiefs Association. Being located in downtown New Brighton, both spaces are adjacent to or directly across the street from existing single family, multi-family and commercial development.

(2b)New Brighton’s tenants, including the Ramsey County Public Library and Minnesota Police Chiefs Association are located in public buildings with access to local walking and biking trails. These trails are multi-use and provide regional connections via Long Lake Regional Park.

(2c) New Brighton’s tenants, including the Ramsey County Public Library and Minnesota Police Chiefs Association are located in public buildings accessible by Metro Transit route 141, which provides daily service.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056
2 star - Action 5:

Have a downtown zoning district that allows residential and compatible commercial development.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
New Brighton’s B-4, Downtown Business district allows, as a permitted use, residential and commercial uses recognizing the downtown commercial area originally developed with unique character and circumstances. The B-4 zoning district standards include requirements that facilitate the unique development patterns under which the area originally prospered and provides for harmonious and attractive development patterns that benefit downtown New Brighton residents and businesses.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056
2 star - Action 7:

Create incentives for vertical mixed-use development in appropriate locations (downtown, commercial districts near colleges or universities, historic commercial districts).

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
New Brighton’s MX, Mixed Use and NBE, New Brighton Exchange zoning districts provide for vertical mixed use development, including mixed residential and commercial and mixed industrial and commercial or professional office that aim to provide a flexible framework for intensely development mixed used centers that will be a vibrant and active place where people can live, work, shop, play and be entertained. Uses must be consistent with the development goals and guidelines outlined in the Old Highway 8 Corridor and Vision for the Heart of New Brighton studies.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056

Efficient Highway- and Auto-Oriented Development {BP no.9}

2 star - Action 1:

Establish design goals for at least one highway/auto-oriented corridor/cluster.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
In 2006 the New Brighton City Council approved a resolution agreeing to the terms and conditions of the Routes of Regional Significance program from the Minnesota Department of Transportation (Mn/DOT) State Aid for Local Transportation Group for Project 07-3, Old Highway 8 NW Reconstruction. To coincide with planned and implemented highway improvements the New Brigton Exchange (aka Northwest Quadrant) framework plan was created with design guidelines. To implement these guidelines new zoning regulations were created.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
he purpose of the NBE New Brighton Exchange District is to provide an area for an intensely developed mixed use center that will be a vibrant and active place where people can live, work, shop, play and be entertained. The mixture of land uses and design specifications in this ordinance are designed to implement the
principles and guidelines established in the 1999 New Brighton Comprehensive Plan and the Northwest
Quadrant Framework Plan and Design Guidelines, including the placement of buildings, streets, parking areas,sidewalks, and open space. It is acknowledged, that in order to respond to market demands, not every element of the Design Guidelines can be implemented into each development but that every development will meet the spirit and intent of the Design Guidelines. Therefore, flexibility is provided within this Article for the City Council to approve site standards that may vary from the described standards in this Article, but only if it is found that the spirit and intent of the Design Guidelines have been met.
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056
1 star - Action 2:

Participate in regional economic development planning with representatives from surrounding townships, cities, the county and business interests to:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of New Brighton actively participates in Accelerate Ramsey County with other Cities within the County. New Brighton is member of the I-35W coalition, and has served on the technical advisory committee for the design and planning of I-35W MnPASS improvements.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
The City has engaged with residents and business owners within the I-35W corridor and we have helped residents understand how a noise wall process. We have received preliminary commitments from some of the apartment owners which will go a long way to the implementation of the sound wall.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056

Transportation Transportation

Living Streets {BP no.11}

1 star - Action 1:

Adopt a complete streets policy, or a living streets policy, which addresses landscaping and stormwater.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2012
Implementation details:
The City of New Brighton recognizes the importance of facilitating multi-modal transportation and has identified existing conditions and needs for pedestrian and bicycle pathways in the 2008 Parks and Recreation Strategic Plan. The plan focuses on areas of improvement that would help residents and visitors safely travel throughout the city and add value to surrounding properties. In addition, the plan identifies connecting pedestrian and bicycle trails to Arden Hills and Shoreview to expand residents’ transportation access. City Trail standards, best trail surfaces, and safety are all considered in the planning and implementation process. In 2010 the City initiated a Safe Routes to School project that provide a safe north south crossing on Silver Lake Road over 694. In 2015 the City worked with MnDOT and Ramsey County to install east west multi-use pathways on 10th Street NW, the route to Mounds View High School, and Highway 96 over 35W which will provides access to Long Lake Regional Park for Arden Hills residents. In 2016 the City worked with MnDOT and Ramsey County to install an east west multi-use pathway on County Road E2 into Arden Hills, home of Valentine Hills Elementary.

New Brighton has been a Tree City USA for 35 years. In order to qualify as a Tree City USA community, New Brighton meets the following four standards: maintaining a tree board or department, establishing a tree care ordinance, documenting at least $2 per capita toward the planting, care, and removal of city trees, and passing and reciting an official Arbor Day proclamation.

New Brighton established a surface water management plan in 2012 that focused on storm water management and pollution prevention. Through incorporation of this plan, the City protects, preserves, and uses natural surface and groundwater storage and retention systems while minimizing public capital expenditures. New Brighton also offers a Rain Garden credit to residents who choose to build a rain garden on their property.
New Brighton is working towards establishing a formal Complete Streets policy and hopes to have the policy adopted by City Council sometime in 2018.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056
1 star - Action 5:

Identify and remedy street-trail gaps between city streets and off-road trails/bike trails to better facilitate walking and biking.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2008
Implementation details:
Hansen Park offers a network of bituminous trails which connect the park to the surrounding neighborhood areas and bicycle-friendly roads. For bicycle commuters who come from further north, Long Lake Road has a dedicated bike lane and links the south border of Mounds View to Pike Lake Trail Park and Long Lake Regional Park. The Rice Creek North Regional Trail is a bituminous path located in northeast New Brighton links to Irondale High School and Edgewood Middle School.

New Brighton also addresses the need for more bicycle pathways that remedy gaps within the city system in the 2008 Parks and Recreation Strategy Plan. The city is working to increase connected pathways with surrounding communities and the regional trail network. The 2018 Comprehensive Plan will include possible future trails and connections.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056
1 star - Action 6:

Implement traffic calming policy/measures, including lane conversions (road diets), roundabouts, shared space and depaving, in at least one street redevelopment project.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2015
Implementation details:
At the intersection of 10th St. NW and 4th Ave NW, New Brighton has implemented a Rectangular Rapid Flashing Beacon, a Pedestrian Push Button, and two Static W11-2 signs with supplemental W16-7pL signs. This intersection connects New Brighton’s Eagles Nest Indoor Playground with a shopping mall, Veterans Park, an apartment complex, St. John the Baptist Church, and City Hall.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056

Mobility Options {BP no.12}

1 star - Action 1:

Increase walking, biking and transit use by one or more of the following means:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2016
Implementation details:
New Brighton has created a comprehensive route map for all sidewalk and trail routes available to bicyclists and pedestrians. The map details the various types of trails in the City as well as Park and School areas. It can be found on New Brighton’s website by clicking here: http://www.newbrightonmn.gov//wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Trails-Map.pdf New Brighton also offers website visitors access to an online interactive map of both New Brighton and Ramsey County.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056
2 star - Action 3:

Prominently identify mobility options: transit; paratransit/Dial-A-Ride; ridesharing/cab services; rental cars; bikes; airports.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2017
Implementation details:
On New Brighton’s “For Residents” webpage (http://www.newbrightonmn.gov/resources/for-residents), the very first content block at the top of the page lists the various mobility options available to residents of the City. These include vehicle, bus, bike, and walking routes throughout the entire City.
In the same area, there is information regarding construction projects on the main roadways residents may use to ensure citizens can adequately plan their daily travel, as well as a link to a biking survey so that those who bike commute can help us improve the transportation options available to them. Information for areas surrounding the City of New Brighton is provided to ensure people can plan their entire transportation route easily.

Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056

Efficient City Fleets {BP no.13}

2 star - Action 1:

Efficiently use your existing fleet of city vehicles by encouraging trip bundling, video conferencing, carpooling, vehicle sharing and incentives/technology.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of New Brighton’s fleet is inventoried and evaluated annually by the Public Works Superintendent. Vehicles and equipment have a useful life and when that time nears, a vehicle condition index system will confirm if it is truly in need of replacement. This in turn provides for new equipment that is fuel efficient and produces less emissions. City staff car pools to training events and conferences reducing fuel use and emissions.
Water distribution operators work load is organized into an efficient route. This reduces fuel usage and emissions output.

The City recently purchased fueling and fleet software that will advise the fleet maintenance staff when vehicle service is required. A properly serviced vehicle will tend to achieve better gas mileage and produce less emissions.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
A properly maintained fleet along with active car pooling and conference calls creates fewer emissions, and unnecessary wear and tear on vehicles.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056
2 star - Action 2:

Right-size/down-size the city fleet with the most fuel-efficient vehicles that are of an optimal size and capacity for their intended functions.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Inspections vehicles were replaced with much more fuel efficient units. Pick-up trucks and older vintage sedans were replaced with Ford Escapes which are more fuel efficient and produce fewer emissions. Police Crown Victoria’s have all been replaced with Ford Interceptors which achieve better gas mileage and produce fewer emissions. Additionally we are pursuing 2-3 fully electric vehicles for our fleet, we hope this happens in the near future.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056

Environmental Management Environmental Management

Sustainable Purchasing {BP no.15}

2 star - Action 1:

Adopt a sustainable purchasing policy or administrative guidelines/practices directing that the city purchase at least:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2018
Implementation details:
(see attachment) The proposed policy would require City staff to purchase copy paper that is composed of no less than 30% recycled content. The policy would also require – if feasible from a financial and
operational standpoint – that appliances purchased by the City meet the Energy Star certification provided by the Federal government.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
This policy was accepted by our council on April 24th, with this policy in place New Brighton is another step in the right direction towards preserving our fragile environment.
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056
3 star - Action 4:

Require purchase of U.S. EPA WaterSense-certified products.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2016
Implementation details:
In 2016, New Brighton received a Clean Water Fund grant focused on improving the city’s water efficiency through managing residential water systems. New Brighton offered rebates to apartment complexes that used significantly more water than their peers. These property owners were customers of the municipal water supply system and they replaced existing toilets and fixtures with more efficient, sustainable devices (which were labeled as U.S. EPA WaterSense-certified).

New Brighton also purchases WaterSense-certified products when updating government facilities. The City ensured optimal water efficiency for new City Hall restrooms during a recent remodel in 2016. In all the restrooms, WaterSense-certified toilets and water efficient sinks were installed
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056

Community Forests and Soils {BP no.16}

2 star - Action 1:

Certify as a Tree City USA.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
New Brighton has been a Tree City for over 34 years. A proclamation was just published and read aloud in the City Council chambers - STATING THAT THE CITY OF NEW BRIGHTON HEREBY DECLARES ARBOR DAY AS APRIL 29, 2016 AND ARBOR MONTH AS MAY, 2016 IN THE CITY OF NEW BRIGHTON.

WHEREAS the City of New Brighton has been recognized by the National Arbor Day Foundation as a Tree City USA for 34 consecutive years, and

WHEREAS the health of the people is tied to the health of their forests; and

WHEREAS trees and forests improve our physical health by cleaning the air, reducing exposure to the sun’s UV rays, and decreasing temperatures during the summertime; and

WHEREAS In 50 years, one tree provides $62,000 worth of air pollution control; and

WHEREAS Childhood asthma rates are lower in urban communities that have a higher density of trees; and

WHEREAS Trees and forests improve our mental health by reducing stress and increasing concentration; and

WHEREAS Forests create high-quality drinking water by acting as a natural filter; and

WHEREAS Getting a daily dose of trees is healthy for all Minnesotans; and

WHEREAS Each year, on the last Friday in April, and throughout the month of May, Minnesotans pay special tribute to rural and community trees and all the natural resources, and dedicate themselves to the continued vitality of our state’s forests.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056
1 star - Action 4:

Maximize tree planting along your main downtown street or throughout the city.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Streetscape designs have been incorporated to include boulevard trees throughout the downtown area. Highways included are Old Highway 8, 10th Street NW, and County Road E2.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056
3 star - Action 6:

Build community capacity to protect existing trees by one or more of:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
New Brighton has a City Forester. New Brighton began removal and treatment of existing Ash trees following the discovery of Emerald Ash Borer.
Emerald Ash Borer in the City of New Brighton

In November of 2013, the Minnesota Department of Agriculture confirmed the discovery of ash trees infested with emerald ash borers (EAB) on residential property in the City of New Brighton. EAB is a serious invasive pest. Consequently, a quarantine has been placed on Ramsey County to slow the spread of EAB to other areas.

The City of New Brighton began treating boulevard and selected park ash trees for EAB in 2010 and continues to follow the recommended treatment guidelines.

For the benefit of the residents, the City has taken preventive steps to establish criteria for contractors treating EAB. The criteria will make sure residents will receive services from a competent contractor at a fair price. For example, each contractor has been in business a minimum of 5 years and has agreed to a per-tree charge of no more than $10 per diameter inch, with a $100 minimum charge.

The City’s website provides specific information on what services the contractor has agreed to and what the property owner can expect from the contractor. Visit www.newbrightonmn.gov and click on the following links: Departments/ Parks and Recreation/ Forestry/ Emerald Ash Borer Treatment Tree Contractors.

In addition, citizens can access informational article’s regarding EAB on the City’s website. Residents can also obtain a brief history of EAB, how it spreads, symptoms of EAB, what to look for in your ash trees, options for treating trees and how the City is responding to save ash trees by watching a video on the City’s website.
Residents who suspect they or a neighbor has EAB should call the Minnesota Department of Agriculture at (651) 201-6684 (press 2) and follow the voice prompts. Also, if you want to become a Forest Pest First Detector go to University of Minnesota website: http://www.myminnesotawoods.umn.edu/forest-pest-first-detector/
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056

Stormwater Management {BP no.17}

1 star - Action 3:

Adopt by ordinance one or more of the following stormwater infiltration/management strategies:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
On May 12, 2015 the City of New Brighton updated the City Code to include 3 ordinance updates adding the latest erosion and sediment control provisions as well as the requirements for permanent stormwater treatment.

Ordinance #'s 830, 831 and 833
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056
3 star - Action 4:

Create a stormwater utility that uses variable fees to incentivize stormwater infiltration, minimize the volume of and pollutants in runoff, and educate property owners.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City has a stormwater utlity and below you find different ways how credits can be issued to address enhanced treatment.

(4) Stormwater Detention / Infiltration. An adjustment of up to 25 percent will be made for those
parcels with onsite measures that limit outflow peak events according to the conditions cited in
this Subsection.
A. A ten percent credit for parcels that limit peak outflow rates during a five year rainfall event
to
rates comparable to the rates from an unimproved vacant property of the same size.


B. An additional fifteen percent credit will be given to parcels that limit peak outflow rate
during a 100-year rainfall event to rates comparable to the rates from an unimproved vacant
property of the same size. (Ord 763 6-24-2008)

(5) Wet Ponding Credit. An adjustment of up to 25 percent will be made to the Stormwater Utility
fee of a parcel for onsite measures that are owned and maintained by the applicant that effectively
reduce the amount of sediments/nutrients that enter the system. It is the responsibility of the
applicant to prove that the wet pond in question meets the following design criteria:
A. The volume of the permanent pool (“dead storage”) shall be greater than the runoff volume
generated from a 2.5 inch rainfall event over the pond tributary area.
B. To promote settling and provide space for sediment accumulation, the average depth (volume/area)
of the permanent pool shall be at least three feet with a maximum depth of ten feet.
C. The pond shall be wedge shaped, narrowest at the inlet and widest at the outlet. A minimum
length to width ratio of 3:1 should be used. The distance between storm sewer outfalls and the pond
outlet shall be maximized to prevent short-circuiting.
D. The pond shall have some type of facility to retain oils and floatable debris. This facility
will be maintained by the applicant. E.
E. An emergency overflow structure or stabilized spillway shall be provided to accommodate
discharges during a storm event with greater than a 2.5 inch rainfall.
F. The side slopes shall not exceed three feet horizontal to one foot vertical for purposes of
stability. (Ord. No. 608, 12-13-94; Code of 2001)
G. The pond shall have a minimum of a 15 foot vegetative buffer around all of its edge. The
vegetative buffer shall not contain any weeds deemed a public nuisance in Section
17. The vegetative buffer shall consist of native plants listed in one of the following documents:
1. BlueThumb Plant List by Rice Creek Watershed Districts
2. The Minnesota Stormwater Manual Appendix E: Minnesota Plant List and Application by Minnesota
Pollution Control Agency
3. Restoring & Managing Native Wetland & Upland Vegetation by Minnesota Board of Water and Soil
Resources & Minnesota Department of Transportation
4. Seeding Manual by Minnesota Department of Transportation (Ord 763 6-24-2008)

(6) Raingarden Credit. An adjustment of 25 percent will be made to the Stormwater Utility fee of a
parcel for one or more gardens that are 100 square feet in size and are owned and maintained by the
applicant that effectively reduce the amount of runoff and nutrients that enter the system. It is
the responsibility of the applicant to prove that the garden in question meets the following design
criteria:
A. The garden shall be at least 10 feet away from any building.
B. The garden shall not be located in area of the yard with slopes greater than 12 percent.
C. The garden shall be located in a depression between 4 to 10 inches deep or have a berm 4 to 10
inches high on the down slope side.
D. The water in the garden shall infiltrate within 48 hours after a rain event.
E. The garden shall not contain any weeds deemed a public nuisance in Section 17.
F. The garden shall consist of native plants listed in one of the following documents:

1. BlueThumb Plant List by Rice Creek Watershed Districts
2. The Minnesota Stormwater Manual Appendix E: Minnesota Plant List and Application by Minnesota
Pollution Control Agency
3. Restoring & Managing Native Wetland & Upland Vegetation by Minnesota Board of Water and Soil
Resources & Minnesota Department of Transportation
4. Seeding Manual by Minnesota Department of Transportation.
(Ord No 763 6-24-2008)
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056

Parks and Trails {BP no.18}

3 star - Action 3:

Achieve minimum levels of city green space and maximize the percent within a ten-minute walk of community members.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of New Brighton owns and maintains 9.6 acres of parkland for every 1,000 residents. A total of 20.6% of land area within New Brighton is parks, open spaces, or publicly accessible school property. A total of 99.3% of households within New Brighton are within a half mile of a park in New Brighton, this number climbs to 100% when parks in neighboring communities are included.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Parks enhance the overall quality of people’s lives, and contribute to greater civic
pride. New Brighton takes great pride in maintaining and enhancing our community through our parks system.
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056
3 star - Action 5:

Create park/city land management standards/practices that maximize at least one of the following:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2018
Implementation details:
B) We have separate trash and recycling canisters throughout all the parks as well as every city facility.

C) Lions Park, the newest park in New Brighton includes a soccer/lacrosse field, softball field, and most notably a storm water pond. Through permissions, contracts, contractors, and grants we are proud to say we now have the funding to use the storm water collected as irrigation for these fields.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
By utilizing stormwater reuse, it is estimated that 60-70 percent of the average annual irrigation demand for the athletic fields will be met, thus reducing the amount of groundwater needed to irrigate.
Descriptive File: view file
Anderson-Johnson associates inc., RCWD, Met Council, Ramsey County.
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056
1 star - Action 8:

Develop a program to involve community members in hands-on land restoration, invasive species management and stewardship projects.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
New Brighton as had an adopt a park program for a number of years now. Our parks staff coordinates with ambitious volunteers to keep our parks clean and aesthetically pleasing for all.

We work with local organizations on buckthorn removal, as well as perform education for the public.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
The Adopt-a-Park Program is designed to encourage partnerships between citizen
groups and the City of New Brighton to help maintain and enhance parks and
open space. This program is intended to be fun, educational and worthwhile. By
participating, groups and individuals can take an active role in the beautification of
their community.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056

Surface Water {BP no.19}

3 star - Action 2:

Conduct or support multi-party community conversations, assessments, plans around improving local water quality and quantity.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2017
Implementation details:
(see attachment) The City has established Storm Sewer Improvement Taxing Districts within the City for Lake Diane and Bicentennial Pond. A Storm Sewer Improvement Taxing District is an area within the territorial limits of a municipality. The municipality may acquire, construct, maintain, and otherwise improve storm sewer systems and related facilities within the district for the benefit of the district.
The Public Works Department works with the residents of each district to determine specific projects and courses of action. The costs involved are recovered by levying tax on all taxable properties within the district.
The City has adopted similar tax levies for both districts for a number of years.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
With these funds both bodies of water have been treated to eliminate invasive species. Improving water quality, and all plant/wildlife surrounding the areas.
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056
1 star - Action 4:

Adopt a shoreland ordinance for all river and lake shoreland areas; reduce flooding and costs through The National Flood Insurance Program's Community Rating System.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2016
Implementation details:
(Please see attachment) The unregulated use of shorelands in the City affects the public health, safety and general welfare not only by contributing to pollution of public waters, but also by impairing the local tax base. Therefore, it is in the best interests of the public health, safety and welfare to provide for the wise use and development of shorelands of public waters.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056
1 star - Action 7:

Create/assist a Lake Improvement District.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2017
Implementation details:
(see attachment for additional information) Long Lake is different invasive vegetation that is impacting the quality of the water and the health of the Lake itself. Members of the Long Lake Improvement Association (LLIA) have approached the City with this concern asking for assistance in finding a funding source to address this concern. The LLIA has been working with state and county agencies as well as the City of New Brighton attempting to find a source of long term funding to address this issue. The LLIA’s intent is to secure funding from a variety of sources starting in 2018 and beyond, so it is understood that the funding from New Brighton is meant to address the immediate need of this year and not to be expected by any party to be a continuing source of funding.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Pike Lake association has been active and successful at eliminating invasive species. We hope this success will be expanded to all water bodies in New Brighton.
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056

Resilient Economic & Community Development Resilient Economic and Community Development

Benchmarks and Community Engagement {BP no.24}

1 star - Action 1:

Use a city commission, or committee to lead, coordinate, and report to and engage community members on implementation of sustainability best practices.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The Citywide Action Team will be responsible for coordinating and reporting progress. The Citywide Action Team is a standing group comprised of staff from all City Departments and Divisions. The Citywide Action Team will utilize existing communication mediums such as social media, the City website, Citywide newsletters, and the local media to communicate the best practices which are implemented.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056
1 star - Action 2:

Organize goals/outcome measures from all city plans and report to community members data that show progress toward meeting these goals.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Through the existing communication mediums we will update community members on the status of our project energy savings. We will develop our goals based upon the guidance from the identified Best Practices and integrate them with City operations. Sustainable actions such as energy saving projects, recycling statistics, and the importance of water conservation is regularly communicated to community members.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Staff provides weekly updates on the City website regarding our water use. Residents receive information on the status of the City wells in City-wide mailings and an annual discussion at our annual City Open House.
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056

Green Business Development {BP no.25}

1 star - Action 2:

Create or participate in a marketing/outreach program to connect businesses with assistance providers, including utilities, who provide personalized energy, waste or sustainability audits and assistance.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of New Brighton, via its website, promotes the Center for Energy and Environment’s energy efficient projects, connecting commercial users to cost effective energy efficiency programs.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056
3 star - Action 5:

Lower the environmental and health risk footprint of a brownfield remediation/redevelopment project beyond regulatory requirements; report brightfield projects.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2016
Implementation details:
The City of New Brighton acquired land that encompassed two superfund sites and a large, 1960’e era dump comprised of one million cubic yards of garbage and debris and remediated the land for redevelopment purposes. Both superfund sites have since been delisted and the dump has been reduced in area by over 50%, with the remaining dump impacted land operating under a landfill gas collection system allowing for safe development in and around the remaining impacted land.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Winner of MN Brownfield's 2016 Community Impact Award.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056

Climate Adaptation and Community Resilience {BP no.29}

2 star - Action 1:

Prepare to maintain public health and safety during extreme weather and climate-change-related events, while also taking a preventive approach to reduce risk for community members.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2005
Implementation details:
New Brighton partners with Ramsey County in order to maintain a comprehensive and coordinated Emergency Operations Plan and All-Hazard Mitigation Plan. The Ramsey County Emergency Management and Homeland Security Department and New Brighton work together, along with neighboring communities, organizations, and state resources to properly prepare for, and recover from, major emergencies that threaten the health, safety, property, and resources of the communities with Ramsey County.
New Brighton has established an emergency line of succession, emergency staff organization, and an emergency operating center in case of disaster that can be found in the Emergency Operations Plan. The emergency management team is made up of a designated emergency staff that includes members from the police, fire, and public works departments. Together, the emergency management team will carry out the following functions: secure and direct resources, coordinate the city government response, coordinate with any adjacent local governments affected by the disaster, coordinate with any businesses or industries affected by the disaster, generate appropriate public information, and coordinate volunteers. The emergency management director is responsible for ensuring operational readiness of the emergency operations center. Each department that has a staff member included in the emergency operations center staffing list is responsible for ensuring that its representative is familiar with the duties they are expected to perform.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
Ramsey County
For more information contact:
Craig Schlichting (City staff) | craig.schlichting@newbrightonmn.gov | 651-638-2056