City Detail

Background Information

City of Richfield
County: Hennepin
Population: 36151
GreenStep City category: A
Full-time equivalent city staff (approx.): 190
Participating township, county, school:

GreenStep Coordinator

Amy Markle
City Staff
612-861-9394
City web page relating to sustainability/GreenStep activities:
GreenStep City resolution: Click here to view the file.
GreenStep City status and date: STEP 3 ( )

City Assessment Files and City Performance Metrics

City councils pass a resolution to join the GreenStep program and are recognized at Step 1. Step 2 and Step 3 recognition levels reflect completed city actions, reported and rated below with stars (1 star = good, 2 stars = better, 3 stars = best). The Assessment File below summarizes completed city actions in a short Word file. Step 4 recognition is awarded to cities who report a minimum number of core metrics for the previous calendar year. These metrics aim to show the aggregate, quantitative results of taking multiple GreenStep actions. Step 5 cities show improvement in the Step 4 metrics. See yearly data for Steps 4&5. Additional city data can be found by reviewing information on B3 Benchmarking and Regional Indicators Initiative.

Assessment File

Best Practice Actions Underway and Completed

Completed actions are denoted by stars.

Total completed actions: 85
1 star actions: 27
2 star actions: 30
3 star actions: 27

Buildings and Lighting Buildings and Lighting

Efficient Existing Public Buildings {BP no.1}

2 star - Action 1:

Enter building information into the Minnesota B3 Benchmarking database and routinely enter monthly energy, water use data for all city-owned buildings.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The city of Richfield collects data on 10 city-owned buildings annually. These buildings are Public Works, Ice Arena, Penn Liquor, Wood Lake Nature Center, Cedar Liquor, the Community Center, Fire Station #2, Lyndale Liquor, the Water Plant, and City Hall/Fire Station #1. Data is current as of February 2018 with 3-9 years of consecutive data, depending on individual utilities.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Amy Kempf (City Staff) | akempf@richfieldmn.gov | 6518619171
2 star - Action 2:

Make no/low cost indoor lighting and operational changes in city-owned/school buildings to reduce energy costs.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Numerous energy efficient items have been installed as part of the construction of the new Public Works Maintenance Facility:
• Motion sensors on all lighting
• Automatic water shut of on all bathroom sinks
• Automatic flushing, low flow toilets in bathrooms

LED lights were installed on the outside of the Wood Lake Nature Center.

The City of Richfield participates in the Xcel Electric Rate Savings Peak-Controlled Rate Program for commercial and industrial customers. During periods of peak demand, such as hot summer days, the Xcel power grid may require more power than is normally available. By participating in Electric Rate Savings, we help reduce the amount of electricity demand, which helps Xcel meet system-wide requirements at critical times.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Due to our ability to significantly reduce power demand when needed, Richfield has moved from the “Level B” to “Level C” discount tier which is the highest discount level available in Xcel's program. Richfield’s annual electric savings will increase by nearly $500 to an estimated $3,900.
Descriptive File:
Xcel Energy
For more information contact:
Chris Link (City staff) | clink@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619174
2 star - Action 5:

Document that the new construction or major remodeling of a public building has met the SB 2030 energy standard or has met or qualified under a green building or energy framework.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
In 2008, the City built a new Public Works Facility as a model for incorporating sustainable design principles in the architectural design as well as the building's operations. The building was designed to meet LEED certification; however, the City decided not to seek certification due to the high cost. The building employs occupancy sensors throughout, low-flow water fixtures; state-of-the art HVAC systems, etc.

Public Works Facility: Maximizes energy efficiency (30-35% better than standard construction), ground source heat pump, daylighting. Green construction and deconstruction (65% demolition materials and construction waste recycled). Low-flow water fixtures. Exceeds the zoning open space requirements by 10%. Manages close to 100% of stormwater on site via rain gardens, retention ponds, minimized building footprint, and permeable paving. All lighting is LED.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Chris Link (City staff) | clink@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619174
1 star - Action 7:

Install for one or more city-owned/school buildings one of the following efficiency measures:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The Public Works facility is heated/cooled by closed-loop/ground source geothermal.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Chris Link (City staff) | clink@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619174

Efficient Existing Private Buildings {BP no.2}

3 star - Action 1:

Create or participate in a marketing/outreach/incentive program to promote/achieve residential energy/water use reduction and energy efficiency.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The Home Energy Squad Enhanced Program has a marketing program that has included citywide mailings, utility bill inserts, information on the City website, citizen workshops, and door-to-door canvassing. Materials are also available in Spanish.

The City is collaborating with the utilities on the Home Energy Squad Enhanced (HESE) program, which offers homeowners a low-cost home energy visit along with the installation of the following energy-efficiency products: Programmable thermostat, weather stripping for two exterior doors, compact fluorescent lights, high-efficiency showerhead, kitchen and bathroom faucet aerators. water heater temperature assessment, adjustment, and insulation, and refrigerator thermometer. The homeowner pays $50 for the visit and installation, while the City pays the remainder of the cost. At the end of the visit and installations, the homeowner is provided with a Home Energy Report that allows the homeowners to best prioritize their efficiency upgrades. Residents who install wall and/or attic insulation that qualifies for rebates from CenterPoint Energy can also apply for up to $200 in additional rebates from the City of Richfield. Both the HESE program and the City's rebate program began in March 2013.
Outcome measures/metrics:
603 HESE home visits have been requested and completed since the program started, which is over half of the number of visits budgeted by the program. 31 of the visits from 2016-2018 were with low income households. From 2013-2015, 14 households used the rebate program, totaling $1,400 in energy related home improvement rebates.
Descriptive File:
Center for Energy and Environment, CenterPoint Energy
For more information contact:
Julie Urban (City staff) | jurban@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619777
3 star - Action 2:

Integrate green building and EV charging best practices information and assistance into the building permit process.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
During the building development review process, City staff make it clear through both oral and written directives that they will evaluate proposals based on the applicable goals and objectives in the Comprehensive Plan including the City's adopted sustainability goal (ch. 4): “Emphasizing sustainability as a measure to ensure the future economic, environmental and social health of the community.”
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Melissa Poehlman (City staff) | MPoehlman@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619766
2 star - Action 4:

Describe energy/water efficiency outcomes and other green building practices at businesses located within/nearby the city.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Best Buy's corporate headquarters, located in Richfield, is a LEED Gold certified building.

The City approved plans for Richfield-Bloomington Honda to quadruple the car dealership's size with a LEED-certifiable building.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Melissa Poehlman (City staff) | MPoehlman@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619766
1 star - Action 5:

Conserve/protect drinking/groundwater resources by creating a water-wise landscaping ordinance/guidance, WaterSense purchasing program, or guidance on rainwater harvesting and home water softener use.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Water System Goal #6 in the City's Comprehensive Plan states: "Promote water conservation and sustainability by reducing water demand, reducing the waste of water, improving the efficiency of the existing system, and educating the public on water conservation."

The City sends water conservation information out in utility bills and as part of the annual CCR report. On January 1, 2010, the city implemented a 3-tier conservation rate structure. Irrigation systems are supposed to have sensors on them and permanent annual water restrictions are in place from 5/1-9/30 to encourage decreased sprinkling.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Russ Lupkes (City staff) | rlupkes@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619175
3 star - Action 6:

Provide a financial or other incentive to private parties who add energy/sustainability improvements, meet the SB 2030 energy standard, or renovate using a green building or energy framework.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City's Foreclosure Purchase Incentive Program (FPIP) aims to stabilize and improve residential neighborhoods suffering from the negative effects of the foreclosure crisis. The FPIP program offers financial assistance to buyers interested in purchasing a foreclosed home through the allocation of federal Neighborhood Stabilization Program funds. There are two financing options with the City's program: Purchase Assistance - $10,000, and Rehabilitation Assistance - $15,000. If the buyer lives in the home for 5 years, the loan is completely forgiven. Although the City does not currently require certification to a green building standard, the upgrading of foreclosed homes to the required health and safety standards is significantly "greener" than allowing the home to further deteriorate to the point of needing demolition.

The City received $1,054,000 in federal funds to acquire, rehabilitate and re-sell foreclosed homes. Homes were rehabbed in accordance with Minnesota Housing’s Green Communities standards. 7 homes have been rehabbed and resold through the program to low and moderate-income households. The City’s Transformation Home Loan Program provides incentive financing for large-scale remodeling projects valued at $50,000 or more. Loans are up to 15% of the total project cost with a maximum loan of $25,000. There are no income limits, no payments, no interest, and the loan is forgiven after 30 years. The program does not include any requirements for certification via a green building framework.
Outcome measures/metrics:
By July 2013, 21 buyers of foreclosed homes received loans.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Julie Urban (City staff) | jurban@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619777

New Green Buildings {BP no.3}

1 star - Action 1:

Require by city policy that new city-owned buildings be built using the SB 2030 energy standard and/or a green building framework.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Most major City building construction and rehabilitation projects will require financing (typically bonds) from the State. As such, the projects will comply with the Minnesota Sustainable Building Guidelines, which are designed to exceed the State energy code by at least 30 percent and achieve the lowest possible lifetime costs.

The sustainability policies in the City's Parks Master Plan states, "That all new park and facility improvements include in the planning or process criterion that improves sustainability of materials, energy use, operating cost and lifecycle replacement and natural environmental impact. Best practices for stormwater retention. That innovative stormwater retention techniques be utilized in new park development and in the renovation of existing parks, such as permeable paving and rain gardens.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Melissa Poehlman (City staff) | MPoehlman@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619766
3 star - Action 4:

Provide a financial or other incentive to private parties who build new buildings that utilize the SB 2030 energy standard and/or a green building framework.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The Richfield Rediscovered Lot Sale Program offers a $5,000 credit on the purchase a vacant lot from the Richfield HRA provided a new home is built that has at least 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, and a 2-car garage; complements the existing neighborhood; and qualifies for "Green" certification.
Outcome measures/metrics:
As of July 2013, the program has awarded 4 rebates: 3 homes certified by the Minnesota Green Path Program and one is LEED certified.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Julie Urban (City staff) | jurban@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619777

Efficient Outdoor Lighting and Signals {BP no.4}

3 star - Action 1:

Require energy efficient, Dark-Sky compliant new or replacement outdoor lighting fixtures on city-owned/private buildings and facilities.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Section 544.09 of the Zoning Code includes outdoor lighting requirements consistent with Dark-Sky principles. The Code applies to both public and privately owned property. However, the Code requires metal halide lighting, although it is common practice citywide to now replace with LED.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Melissa Poehlman (City staff) | MPoehlman@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619766
3 star - Action 2:

Purchase LEDs for all future street lighting and traffic signals.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Street lighting is currently high pressure sodium but it is common practice to replace bad ballasts with LEDs. Xcel Energy doesn't meter it; instead, the City pays a per fixture fee. The City partnered with students from the U of M to conduct an energy audit of its streetlight system. The study recommended LED lights and the installation of solar panels on the streetlights to further reduce energy usage, energy costs and carbon emissions.
Outcome measures/metrics:
272 LED street lights have been installed in the City, almost 11% of total street lighting.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Chris Link (City staff) | clink@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619174
3 star - Action 4:

Coordinate traffic signals and/or optimize signal timing so as minimize car idling at intersections yet maintain safe and publicly acceptable vehicle speeds.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City coordinated with Hennepin County and MNDOT to synchronize all of the traffic signals (which are LED) in the City.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Chris Link (City staff) | clink@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619174
2 star - Action 5:

Use LED/solar-powered lighting for a flashing sign or in a street, parking lot or park project.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
In Richfield, all roundabouts and an additional intersection feature Rectangular Rapid Flash Beacons, with future options for RRFBs being investigated. Solar LED trail lighting is in 2 parks - Adams Hill and Monroe. All lighting was replaced with LED in the the parking lot of the ice arena/pool.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Chris Link (City staff) | clink@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619174
2 star - Action 6:

Relamp/improve exterior building lighting for city-owned buildings/facilities with energy efficient, Dark-Sky compliant lighting.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City replaced standard Wall Pack fixtures on park buildings, the Water Plant, and on the Ice Arena with Dark Sky compliant fixtures and LED bulbs. It is common practice to replace old lighting with LED fixtures at municipal buildings, including well houses.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Chris Link (City staff) | clink@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619174
1 star - Action 7:

Replace city-owned parking lot/ramp lighting with Dark-Sky compliant, energy efficient, automatic dimming lighting technologies.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City replaced the lighting for the Ice Arena parking lot with LED bulbs in 2014.
Outcome measures/metrics:
In addition to saving energy and cutting costs, LED lighting has provided better security, cutting the number of break-ins in half.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Kris Weiby (City staff) | dweiby@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619354
3 star - Action 8:

Replace the city's existing traffic signals with LEDs.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City is responsible for maintenance of all of the traffic signals in the City, including those on County and State-owned roads. The City has replaced 100% of these signals with LED bulbs.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Chris Link (City staff) | clink@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619174

Building Redevelopment {BP no.5}

3 star - Action 5:

Adopt development/design standards and programs that facilitate infill, redevelopment, and adaptable buildings.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
All development in Richfield is infill. The City has prepared master plans with design standards for all of its major commercial areas: Lakes at Lyndale (Richfield's downtown), Lyndale Gateway, 66th Street, the Penn Avenue corridor, Cedar Ave. corridor (MN Hwy 77), and the I-494 corridor.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Melissa Poehlman (City staff) | MPoehlman@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619766

Land Use Land Use

Comprehensive, Climate and Energy Plans {BP no.6}

2 star - Action 1:

Adopt a comprehensive plan or (for Category B & C cities) adopt a future land use plan that was adopted by the county or a regional entity.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City's most recent Comprehensive Plan was revised and approved by council in 2018. Community meetings were held to seek public input on ideas and concepts that were assembled based on initial community input. The concepts were intended to allow a testing of some of the “big ideas” being considered as part of the plan. As matter of policy, the City organizes stakeholder groups for all area plans and master plans.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Melissa Poehlman (City staff) | MPoehlman@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619766
3 star - Action 2:

Demonstrate that regulatory ordinances comply with the comprehensive plan including but not limited to having the zoning ordinance explicitly reference the comprehensive plan as the foundational document for decision making.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Section 507.03 in the Zoning Code states, “The purpose of the zoning code is to protect and promote the public health, safety, comfort, aesthetics, economic viability, and general welfare of the city, and specifically to achieve the following objectives: a) To assist in the implementation of the city's comprehensive plan..."

The individual sections of the Zoning Code include a "Purpose" subsection but not all sections reference the Comprehensive Plan goals.

The City's permit application forms and staff reports reference the importance of compliance with the Comp Plan. The applications state that the City will evaluate the proposed developments for "Consistency with the elements and objectives of the city’s comprehensive plan and any additional long range plans."
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Melissa Poehlman (City staff) | MPoehlman@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619766
3 star - Action 3:

Include requirements in comprehensive and/or other plans for intergovernmental coordination addressing regional land use and watershed / wellhead impacts, infrastructure, transportation, economic development and city/regional services.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
All metro area cities coordinate their Comprehensive Plans via the Metropolitan Council on the regional issues of aviation, public transportation, parks and open space, wastewater treatment, land use planning, forecasting population growth, ensuring adequate affordable housing, water quality, and water management. The City shares a "soft" border only with Edina where the City's residential abuts Edina's commercial uses (the other borders abut freeways and the airport).

The City participates in a wide variety of organizations including the following: MN League of Cities, Twin Cities Regional Council of Mayors, the 494 Coalition, the Regional Indicators Initiative, the Metropolitan Airports Commission, state agencies (DNR, MPCA, Dept. of Commerce, etc.), the Richfield-Bloomington Watershed Management Organization, and the Home Energy Squad Enhanced Program. To share fields, courts, gymnasiums and other recreation facilities and to operate programs, the City partners with the School District and the Academy of Holy Angels through Joint Facilities Agreements, as well as the adjacent cities, the YMCA, the Adaptive Recreation and Learning Exchange (AR&LE) cooperative, and private businesses.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Melissa Poehlman (City staff) | MPoehlman@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619766
Not rated - Action 5:

Adopt climate mitigation and/or energy independence goals and objectives in the comprehensive plan or in a separate policy document, and include transportation recommendations such as becoming an EV-ready city.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
City participates in the Regional Indicators Initiative, which prepared a citywide, carbon baseline assessments for 2008-2013.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Amy Markle (City staff) | amarkle@richfieldmn.gov | 612-861-9394

Resilient City Growth {BP no.7}

3 star - Action 1:

Limit barriers to higher density housing by including in the city zoning ordinance and zoning map:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The R District in the Zoning Code has a minimum lot size that would allow less than 6.5 DU per acre. R1 District even lower. Comp plan up to 8 DU/A in low-density residential areas.

The multi-family and mixed use districts (Sections 525 and 527) allow densities that are significantly higher than 23 du/acre (24-150 du/acre). The districts predominate in the City's commercial centers and transit nodes.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Melissa Poehlman (City staff) | MPoehlman@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619766
2 star - Action 3:

Achieve higher intensity commercial/industrial land uses through at least one of the following strategies:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Mixed Use Districts (MU-C and MU-R) include zero lot lines (build-to line). For commercial districts, Section 534.11, Subd. 2 (b): "The front setback requirement for a principal building on a lot located along an arterial road may be reduced to five (5) feet when a customer entrance is provided along that wall of the building." The Code does not include FAR minimums.

The Mixed Use districts are located in areas where there is existing commercial and residential intensity and planned growth. Also the Land Use Plan Map in the Comprehensive Plan designates mixed use and higher residential densities as the predominant land uses in the City's commercial centers.

Section 544.15 of the Zoning Code states: "Pedestrian circulation and access, Subd.1. Pedestrian access points shall be provided at all pedestrian arrival points to the development including the property edges, adjacent lots, abutting street intersections, crosswalks, and at transit stops. Pedestrian access shall be coordinated with existing development to provide circulation patterns between developments.” One of the goals for the downtown area in the Comp Plan states: "As the market permits, provide circulator transit services connecting the City Center area to the remainder of Richfield." The plan for the I-494 corridor (p. 4-9) “envisions the evolution of a strip freeway corridor into a complete community that features a range of housing types, shops, services, entertainment and amenities. The proposed land use pattern for the area is described as an urban village, an area of multiple story buildings that are more densely developed than the surrounding neighborhoods achieving a greater mix of land uses and more pedestrian activity.” This complete neighborhood philosophy permeates the City's plans for its major commercial areas.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Melissa Poehlman (City staff) | MPoehlman@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619766
2 star - Action 4:

Provide incentives for infill projects, or for life-cycle housing at or near job or retail centers, or for achieving an average net residential density of seven units per acre.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City 's Housing and Redevelopment Authority uses tax increment financing, land write downs, and the City's loan and grant programs for developments consistent with its Comprehensive Plan.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
John Stark (City staff) | jstark@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619775

Mixed Uses {BP no.8}

2 star - Action 1:

Organize or participate in a community planning/design process for the city/a mixed use district.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
During the development of the 2008 Comprehensive Plan, 52 people attended a meeting on 2/15/07 and completed survey forms designed to learn about the meeting participants and their views on several community development issues. Over a two month period, four community meetings were held to seek public input on ideas and concepts that were assembled based on initial community input. The concepts were intended to allow a testing of some of the “big ideas” being considered as part of the plan. As matter of policy, the City organizes stakeholder groups for all area plans and master plans.

The City hired private consultants for the development of the Comp Plan and for master plans like the Bicycle Master Plan. These consultants also helped facilitate the stakeholder-involvement processes.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Melissa Poehlman (City staff) | MPoehlman@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619766
2 star - Action 3:

Modify a planned unit development ordinance to emphasize mixed use development, to limit residential PUDs to areas adjacent to commercial development, and/or to add sustainability features.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City's PUD regulations in the Zoning Code allow mixed uses. All residential PUDs are adjacent to commercial and transit nodes. Although the PUD regulations do not specifically require adjacency, for a development to be consistent with the Comp Plan, it must comply.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Melissa Poehlman (City staff) | MPoehlman@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619766
2 star - Action 5:

Have a downtown zoning district that allows residential and compatible commercial development.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The downtown is zoned primarily for PUDs (PC-2 Planned General Commercial, and PMR Planned Multifamily) and C-2 General Commercial. The commercial PUDs allow non-commercial land uses to occupy up to 25% of the gross floor area in the PUD, and the residential PUDs allow non-residential uses to occupy up to 25% of the gross floor area. These districts provide enough mixed-use flexibility without the need for an overlay district. The C-2 General Commercial District does not allow residential uses.

Richfield's downtown in the vicinity of Lyndale Ave. and 66th St. is zoned primarily for commercial and medium-to-high density residential.

Lakes at Lyndale Connectivity Plan was completed, approved, and is being implemented.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Melissa Poehlman (City staff) | MPoehlman@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619766
2 star - Action 6:

Incorporate form-based zoning approaches into the zoning code, in those areas where a diverse mix of uses is desired.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The Mixed Use Districts (MU-Regional, MU-Commercial, MU-Neighborhood) are designed as hybrids of traditional zoning and form-based codes. The requirements regarding form, massing, building location on the site, build-to-lines, building design and materials, etc. are consistent with the principles of form-based codes. However, the Code does not rely on illustrative diagrams and streetscape requirements that are essential elements in a form-based code. The Mixed Use Districts are located along significant commercial corridors: Penn Ave. and 66th St.; north of I-494; and Hwy 77 (Cedar Ave).
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Melissa Poehlman (City staff) | MPoehlman@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619766

Efficient Highway- and Auto-Oriented Development {BP no.9}

2 star - Action 1:

Establish design goals for at least one highway/auto-oriented corridor/cluster.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City has prepared master plans for two highway corridors: Cedar Ave (MN Hwy 77) and I-494. The vision of the I-494 Corridor/77th Street Plan (12/6/05) is "aimed at helping the community shape future development in the corridor to be more unique and identifiable, urban in character, pedestrian-friendly, economically sustainable and ultimately, more livable." The plan establishes design goals and standards. The City added the Mixed Use Districts in the Zoning Code specifically to implement these policies. All new development projects are required to adhere to road/transportation goals and standards, overseen by the City's Administrative Review Committee.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jack Broz (City staff) | jbroz@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619792
1 star - Action 2:

Participate in regional economic development planning with representatives from surrounding townships, cities, the county and business interests to:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City shares a "soft" border only with Edina where the City's residential abuts Edina's commercial uses (the other borders abut freeways and the airport). The City participates in the following organizations: MN League of Cities, Twin Cities Regional Council of Mayors, the 494 Coalition, and the Regional Indicators Initiative.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Melissa Poehlman (City staff) | MPoehlman@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619766
1 star - Action 4:

Allow auto-oriented commercial districts at the sub-urban edge and/or in tightly defined and smaller urban development corridors/nodes that have some bike/walk/transit access.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Four limited access freeways run adjacent to or through the City (I-494, I-35W, Hwy 62, and Hwy 77). Although the historic development pattern in the vicinity of freeway access ramps has been auto-oriented, the City's Comprehensive Plan and Zoning Code calls for mixed use and medium-to-high-density residential along the I-494 corridor consistent with the adopted "I-494 Corridor Master Plan."
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Amy Markle (City staff) | amarkle@richfieldmn.gov | 612-861-9394

Design for Natural Resource Conservation {BP no.10}

1 star - Action 1:

Conduct a Natural Resource Inventory or Assessment (NRI or NRA); incorporate protection of priority natural systems or resources such as groundwater through the subdivision or development process.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
In 2008, the City completed its Natural Resources Inventory.

Neither the Zoning Code nor its subdivision section have minimum standards for the protection of high quality open space. However, virtually all of the natural areas and high quality open spaces are already protected in public parks.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Amy Markle (City staff) | amarkle@richfieldmn.gov | 612-861-9394
1 star - Action 3:

For cities within metropolitan areas, incorporate woodland best management practices addressing protection of wooded areas into zoning or development review.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Section 544.03, Subd.3 and 4 of the Zoning Code -landscaping and screening requirements - include extensive requirements for the identification and protection during development of existing on-site trees via landscape plans. Woodland areas, like Wood Lake Nature Center, will never be developed and will continue to be protected.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Melissa Poehlman (City staff) | MPoehlman@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619766

Transportation Transportation

Living Streets {BP no.11}

3 star - Action 1:

Adopt a complete streets policy, or a living streets policy, which addresses landscaping and stormwater.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City adopted a complete streets policy and has been implementing it. Policy 1 states: "The City of Richfield seeks to enhance the safety, access, convenience and comfort of all users of all ages and abilities, including pedestrians (including people requiring mobility aids), bicyclists, transit users, motorists and freight drivers, through the design, operation and maintenance of the transportation network so as to create a connected network of facilities accommodating each mode of travel that is consistent with and supportive of the community’s values ...." This is a part of the City's 'Sweet Streets' program.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Logan Vlasaty (City Staff) | lvlasaty@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619789
3 star - Action 3:

Modify a street in compliance with the city's complete streets policy.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Modified streets include: Richfield Pkwy, Portland Ave, 66th St from Xerxes to 16th, 75th from Xerxes to 35W, 76th from 35W to 12th, 11th from 12th to 72nd, 72nd from 11th to Diagonal and Diagonal from 72nd to Cedar were all reconstructed as part of the 2 year Metro Sewer Project. The project consisted of both grey and green infrastructure elements. Grey-sidewalk, multi-purpose trail, bike lanes. Green-established vegetation in boulevards, boulevard trees and a rain garden at Ell South.

76th Street was reduced from 4 lanes of concrete to 2 lanes of asphalt. The ROW from the 4 lanes was used to add bike lanes, sidewalks, multi-purpose trail, green boulevards on both sides of the roadway and boulevard trees on both sides.

In 2011, the City reconstructed 75th Street from Xerxes Avenue to Humboldt Avenue. The design replaced the old asphalt roadway with a new streetscape with the following features: Two asphalt vehicle lanes, on-street bike lanes, concrete sidewalk on the south side, Three Rivers Park Regional Trail on the north side, boulevards and boulevard trees. 
Outcome measures/metrics:
The 76th St. road diet resulted in reconstruction cost savings of approximately $2 million, or one-third of the original cost estimated for reconstruction. Recent mill and overlay for the entire city has avoided future reconstruction costs of several million dollars.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jack Broz (City staff) | jbroz@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619792
3 star - Action 4:

Identify, prioritize and remedy complete streets gaps and lack of connectivity/safety within your road network by, for example, adding a bike route/lane, truck route, sidewalk or mid-block alley.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City has adopted the Richfield Bicycle Master Plan and Pedestrian Master Plan, in addition to the Transportation chapter of the City's Comprehensive Plan, all of which inventories and maps existing facilities, infrastructure gaps, and details a capital improvements program.

The City's Capital Improvement Budget/Plan programs funding for improvements consistent with the Comprehensive Plan, the Bicycle Master Plan, and the safe routes to school plan. Although the four freeways in the City pose significant challenges, the City built the following: A pedestrian bridge at 73rd St. over I-35W, 76 St. trail on north side of I-35W, and a pedestrian underpass of I-35W at 66 St.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jack Broz (City staff) | jbroz@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619792
3 star - Action 6:

Implement traffic calming policy/measures, including lane conversions (road diets), roundabouts, shared space and depaving, in at least one street redevelopment project.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Restripe: 12 to 11 width dropped from 4 lanes to 3 (opposing left) on 11th Ave, 72nd Street, 76th Street, Portland Ave, and 66th St.

Roundabouts: 4 on 66th St. and 3-5 proposed in future projects.

Richfield’s Guiding Principles used in every transportation project emphasize multi-modal design as the community’s top priority – a concept also seen in internal planning practices which start with land use considerations and then, in order, pedestrian, transit, bicycle, and vehicle performance measures. This is seen in the recent 66th Street construction which now has:
• Safer roads with raised concrete medians
• New turn lanes in key areas
• New sidewalks and trails with a boulevard buffer
• New paths to use when bicycling
• Better stormwater management
• Improved accessibility for people with disabilities
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jack Broz (City staff) | jbroz@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619792

Mobility Options {BP no.12}

3 star - Action 1:

Increase walking, biking and transit use by one or more of the following means:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City of Richfield has been certified as a Bicycle Friendly Bronze community by the League of American Bicyclists. The City's Comprehensive Plan includes detailed maps of civic and commercial centers and transit corridors. The City's Bike Master Plan shows existing and planned bicycle facilities. The Twin Cities Bike Map shows numerous designated bike routes that criss-cross the City. MetroTransit provides printed and on-line route information. Hennepin County maps show bike routes and trails.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
League of American Bicyclists
For more information contact:
Jack Broz (City staff) | jbroz@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619792
1 star - Action 5:

Launch telework/flexwork efforts in city government, businesses or at a local health care provider.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City of Richfield has a Modified Work Schedule policy for certain employees and under approval of the City Manager, as well as a short-term telecommuting policy.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Jesse Swenson (City staff) | jswenson@richfieldmn.gov | 612-861-9704

Efficient City Fleets {BP no.13}

2 star - Action 1:

Efficiently use your existing fleet of city vehicles by encouraging trip bundling, video conferencing, carpooling, vehicle sharing and incentives/technology.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City has automatic vehicle locator (AVL) technology on 85% of the fleet. It is also used to track and economize salt application rates on trucks. The City has video conferencing equipment at City Hall and in the Public Works Facility. Common practice to carpool to meetings.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Chris Link (City staff) | clink@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619174
2 star - Action 2:

Right-size/down-size the city fleet with the most fuel-efficient vehicles that are of an optimal size and capacity for their intended functions.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Students from the U of M completed an inventory and energy audit of the City's fleets and equipment in 2011. Recommendations included the cost-effectiveness of the recommendation to convert certain vehicles to diesel/CNG fuel. 3 hybrid vehicles will be purchased for Police and 2 additional PHEVs (Mitsubishi Outlander Sport) will be purchased in 2019.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Chris Link (City staff) | clink@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619174
1 star - Action 3:

Phase-in operational changes, equipment changes including electric vehicles, and no-idling practices for city or local transit fleets.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City has AVL (automatic vehicle locator) technology on 85% of its fleet. AVL monitors idle time and records indicate idling is not a significant problem. City efforts include: a) Monthly monitoring and reporting for staff on fuel usage and costs. b) Training for more efficient driving, including anti-idling behavior/rules. c) Maintenance schedules that optimize vehicle life and fuel efficiency. d) Installed electric power feedpoint in employee parking area at City Hall. e) Currently using B-10 diesel fuel. g) Purchasing 2 electric vehicles in 2019.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Chris Link (City staff) | clink@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619174

Demand-Side Travel Planning {BP no.14}

1 star - Action 1:

Reduce or eliminate parking minimums: add parking maximums; develop district parking.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The development standards in the City's Zoning Code (Section 544.13, Subd. 7) detail parking maximums.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Melissa Poehlman (City staff) | MPoehlman@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619766
1 star - Action 2:

For cities with regular transit service, require or provide incentives for the siting of retail services at transit/density nodes.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The Comprehensive Plan identifies transit routes and calls for mixed use development (including medium-to-high-density residential) at the City's key commercial/transit nodes. The Zoning Code allows mixed use at the Penn Ave./66th St. commercial center and along the I-494 corridor (but not in the downtown area at Lyndale and 66th). The Code does not require housing projects at these locations to have a mixed use retail/office component.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Melissa Poehlman (City staff) | MPoehlman@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619766
2 star - Action 4:

Adopt a travel demand management plan for city employees or incorporate into development regulations TDM or transit-oriented development standards or LEED for Neighborhood Development certification.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Section 544.11 Subd. 1 and 2 of the Zoning Code regarding traffic and parking studies states, “In review of a project or application, the City may require, at the developer's expense, submission of a traffic and/or parking analysis that is prepared by a traffic engineer. Such analysis shall assess the potential impact of a proposed project on roadways, intersections, and/or on-site parking and circulation. If a traffic study indicates that a proposed project or use will have significant impact on the existing service levels of roadways and intersections, the City may require a ‘traffic management plan’ to mitigate traffic impacts. Such plan may include travel demand management strategies, use of transit facilities, or other appropriate measures to reduce traffic congestion. Such plan may also necessitate improvements to road systems.” The city allows for parking reductions based on frequently operating transit nearby.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Melissa Poehlman (City staff) | MPoehlman@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619766

Environmental Management Environmental Management

Sustainable Purchasing {BP no.15}

2 star - Action 1:

Adopt a sustainable purchasing policy or administrative guidelines/practices directing that the city purchase at least:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The Richfield City Council adopted a sustainable purchasing policy on March 13, 2018.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Chris Regis (City staff) | cregis@richfieldmn.gov | 612-861-9723
1 star - Action 5:

Set minimum standards for the percentage of recycled-content material in asphalt and roadbed aggregate or other construction materials, and for compost and warm mix asphalt use.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
No official policy, but it is common practice. Contractor specs. The entire Met Sewer Project was paved using 100% recycled asphalt.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Logan Vlasaty (City Staff) | lvlasaty@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619789

Urban Forests and Soils {BP no.16}

3 star - Action 1:

Certify as a Tree City USA.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Richfield has been certified as a Tree City USA for 32 years (as of 2018).

The City has an annual tree budget of $18 per resident and publicizes financial and other benefits through the Tree City USA website.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Chris Link (City staff) | clink@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619174
2 star - Action 3:

Budget for and achieve resilient urban canopy/tree planting goals.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City has a minimum annual budget for replacement trees, which pays for approximately 250 1.5” BB (balled and burlapped).

The Parks and Trails chapter of the Comprehensive Plan does not include a tree canopy goal. The City's overall canopy is about 25%. The residential canopy is about 70%.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Chris Link (City staff) | clink@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619174
2 star - Action 4:

Maximize tree planting along your main downtown street or throughout the city.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Street trees are on both sides of all of streets (main & residential); about 90% of properties have at least 1 boulevard tree.

The City planted 700 trees on both sides of 76th St. reconstruction project. It is common practice on street projects to landscape with tree planting.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Chris Link (City staff) | clink@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619174
3 star - Action 6:

Build community capacity to protect existing trees by one or more of:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City’s Forestry Division of Public Works includes certified arborists and other tree professionals who provide tree inspections and diagnostics for public and private properties. 6 staff are MN Certified Tree Inspectors.  

The City has had an EAB comprehensive prep/response plan in place since 2009. Since then, forestry team members are actively treating boulevard ash trees with products to prevent the infestation of Emerald Ash Borer consistent with the City's EAB Management Plan.  City staff treated the 300+ oak trees at Augsburg Park to control the native pest, the two-lined chestnut borer. Tree variety has been diversified, especially because of climate change and pest/disease reasons.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Chris Link (City staff) | clink@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619174

Stormwater Management {BP no.17}

3 star - Action 3:

Adopt by ordinance one or more of the following stormwater infiltration/management strategies:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Section 429.05 of the City Code, Storm water Management for Land Altering Activities, requires that “Storm water runoff discharge rates may not exceed the existing conditions for the one-, ten-, and 100-year storm events. If the increase in imperviousness is 50 percent or greater, the discharge rate requirements must be based on pre-development conditions.... Water quality control facilities must remove 50 percent of the phosphorous on an annual average removal basis.” In addition to the reference to the City Code, four other plans, ordinances, and organizations are in place in the City to manage storm water: The Richfield Storm Water Pollution Prevention Program (SWPPP), two watershed district organizations and plans (Nine Mile Creek and Minnehaha Creek watershed districts), and the Richfield / Bloomington Water Management Organization.

In addition to the reference to the City Code, four other plans, ordinances, and organizations are in place in the City to manage stormwater: The Richfield Storm Water Pollution Prevention Program (SWPPP), two watershed district organizations and plans (Nine Mile Creek and Minnehaha Creek watershed districts), and the Richfield / Bloomington Water Management Organization.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Patrick Martin (City staff) | pmartin@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619797
3 star - Action 4:

Create a stormwater utility that uses variable fees to incentivize stormwater infiltration, minimize the volume of and pollutants in runoff, and educate property owners.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City's stormwater utility does charge variable fees that are designed to encourage the maximization of on-site treatment. The LEED-certified Best Buy Headquarters campus took advantage of the City's program.

On some redevelopments, the City offers incentives depending on what is being done on-site. This is determined on a case-by-case basis. For other developments, the City recommends that on-site BMP’s be installed, such as grit chambers or sump manholes, and then enters into a maintenance agreement where the City takes over the yearly maintenance and bills it back to the owner.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Patrick Martin (City staff) | pmartin@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619797

Parks and Trails {BP no.18}

3 star - Action 1:

Make improvements within your city's system of parks, offroad trails and open spaces.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City has completed the following important trail and park links: 1) The City completed the bike lane link along Bloomington Ave. 2) In collaboration with the Three Rivers Park District, the City added its first regional bike/pedestrian trail link-up with the Nine Mile Creek Trail and Inner City Trail. 3) On Portland Ave., the City a added bike lane between 66 and 76 St. 4) The City wants to connect Veterans Park to Taft Park by vacating a road and creating a greenway space.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Amy Markle (City staff) | amarkle@richfieldmn.gov | 612-861-9394
3 star - Action 2:

Plan and budget for a network of parks, green spaces, water features and trails for areas where new development is planned.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Before Minnesota law allowed park dedication requirements, the City had already developed and was maintaining its park system via funds from the 4 liquor stores the City owns (net profits of about $450,000 per year). The City does not have park dedication requirements. However, Section 500.07, Subd. 3 of the City’s subdivision regulation, dedication of park land, states: “In appropriate plats or subdivisions to be developed for residential uses, the Council may require that a portion of such land of sufficient size and character be set aside and dedicated to the public for public use as parks and playgrounds. The subdivider may, however, contribute an equivalent amount in cash as determined by the Council and all such payments received by the City shall be placed in a special fund and used only for the acquisition of land for parks and playgrounds.” Also, the Parks Master Plan states. "Redevelopment. As portions of the City redevelop, the City should ensure that new development have a provision for public/private open space. In particular the I-494 corridor study recommended a continuous green area along the I-494 edge with a new open space south of 77th Street and other public/private open spaces throughout the corridor."
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Amy Markle (City staff) | amarkle@richfieldmn.gov | 612-861-9394
3 star - Action 3:

Achieve minimum levels of city green space and maximize the percent within a ten-minute walk of community members.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
All residents are within ½ mile of a park or protected green space. 460 acres of municipal parkland/population of 32,489 (2012) equals 14 areas per 1,000 residents.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Amy Markle (City staff) | amarkle@richfieldmn.gov | 612-861-9394
2 star - Action 5:

Create park/city land management standards/practices that maximize at least one of the following:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The Parks Master Plan component of the City's Comprehensive Plan calls for natural resource preservation and environmental sustainability. Also, the City worked with graduate students from the U of M to develop an analysis of vegetation management and low maintenance standards for turf management in the City's parks.

The second study with the U of M looked at improving fishing and recreational opportunities at Taft Lake. With a grant from the Minnehaha Watershed District, Legion Lake and Taft Lake are working to reduce nitrates, flocculation and infiltration systems. Three watersheds: Minnehaha via pipes from Taft Lake to Nokomis. Improve as a fishery with help of DNR. Very deep and accessible.
Outcome measures/metrics:
"No mow" is practiced in several parks and turf strengthening efforts have decreased the need to use pesticides/fertilizers. This has helped park grass/turf become more drought and weed resistant.
Descriptive File:
University of Minnesota, DNR
For more information contact:
Amy Markle (City staff) | amarkle@richfieldmn.gov | 612-861-9394
2 star - Action 7:

Document that the operation and maintenance, or construction / remodeling, of at least one park building used an asset management tool, the SB 2030 energy standard, or a green building framework.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Public Works retrofitted ice arena with energy saving equipment w. Harris Mechanical. Savings and paid off 20-year loan for improvements.

The City installed rooftop solar panels on its Wood Lake Nature Center and a grey water system for City Hall.

The Wood Lake Nature Center includes an interactive display that offers a variety of educational screens about the benefits of solar energy and how the system operates. It also describes the power output of the system in terms of the electrical demands of everyday electrical appliances.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Amy Markle (City staff) | amarkle@richfieldmn.gov | 612-861-9394
2 star - Action 8:

Develop a program to involve community members in hands-on land restoration and stewardship projects.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Annual Earth Day/Arbor Day Celebration at Wood Lake Nature Center includes volunteer opportunities to remove buckthorn, restore native vegetation, plant trees, pick up trash and then make eco-crafts to recycle the trash, as well as working on converting failed prairie to a sugar bush. Around 20-35 people participate every year.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Karen Shragg (City staff) | kshragg@richfieldmn.gov | 612-861-9366

Surface Water {BP no.19}

1 star - Action 3:

Adopt and report on measurable, publicly announced surface water improvement targets for water bodies, including the percent of lake, river, wetland and ditch shoreline with at least a 50-foot vegetation buffer.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City provides ongoing education on water quality issues through the annual report for the Wood Lake Nature Center. In February of 2019, the City adopted a surface water management plan for all three watershed districts that Richfield encompasses, including Nine Mile Creek, Minnehaha Creek and the Richfield-Bloomington watershed. The latter has its own management organization (12/19/83) and management plan (July 2008) to preserve and use natural water storage and retention systems.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Patrick Martin (City staff) | pmartin@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619797
2 star - Action 6:

Implement an existing TMDL implementation plan.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Minnehaha and Richfield-Bloomington watershed districts have general chloride and phosphorus reductions plans and TMDLs. No bodies of water in Richfield are on the state's impaired waters list.

A small part of Richfield is part of the Nine Mile Creek Watershed District. The watershed district published a TMDL report in 2010 stating that cities must reduce salt application rates by 62%. The first step was staff training that was provided by the watershed district. From there the City made the following changes to reduce the amount of salt applied to streets:
• Calibration of salters
• Apply salt according to pavement temp
• Using alternative types of salt
Outcome measures/metrics:
After implementing a salt reduction program in 2010, city staff have been able to reduce salt application rates by more than 1/3, going from 1,500-1,600 tons used per season to around 1,000 tons.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Patrick Martin (City staff) | pmartin@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619797

Efficient Water and Wastewater Systems {BP no.20}

2 star - Action 2:

Plan and budget for motor maintenance and upgrades so as to assure the most energy efficient, durable and appropriate equipment is available when upgrades or break downs occur.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City of Richfield has 7 wells with motors that range from 125hp to 150hp. From 2005-2007, all 4 250hp high service motors were replaced with high efficiency motors, which are all on soft starts. From 2007-2010, the City replaced all 7 motors with high efficiency motors and installed a Variable Frequency Drive (VFD) at each location. In 2011, Xcel Energy used Richfield’s Motor Efficiency Program as a case study because we had a total energy savings of 375,570 kWh. It is common practice to replace motors with high-efficiency motors whenever replacements are needed.

Our SCADA system was replaced in 2012; we use the trending mechanism to track flows and amperage which allows us to see fluctuations and address them before they become issues.

In 2004, we completed a compressor study. From the study it was determined our 3 current (25hp) compressors were oversized and not efficient. We then worked with Xcel Energy on a customized replacement plan and we now have 3 15hp, high-efficiency compressors.

In 2009, we completed an energy assessment in conjunction with Xcel Energy. From the assessment we implemented the following: 1) Installed motions sensors throughout the water plant. 2) Replaced light bulbs with 28w, down from the 32w. 3) Replacing fixtures with LED ones.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
Xcel Energy
For more information contact:
Russ Lupkes (City staff) | rlupkes@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619175
3 star - Action 4:

Optimize energy and chemicals use at drinking water / wastewater facilities and decrease chloride in wastewater discharges.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
We have back-up generators and are already part of the Xcel Energy’s peak shaving program. We recycle all water used for backwashing and from the filter presses. This water gets pumped back to the head of the plant for re-treatment.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Russ Lupkes (City staff) | rlupkes@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619175
1 star - Action 7:

Create a demand-side pricing program to reduce demands on water and wastewater systems.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
A 3-tiered water conservation rate was adopted and implemented January 1, 2010. Other conservation measures such as sprinkling/irrigation restrictions are part of city code.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Russ Lupkes (City staff) | rlupkes@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619175

Sustainable Consumption and Waste {BP no.22}

1 star - Action 1:

Improve city operations and procurement to prevent and reuse, recycle and compost waste from all public facilities (including libraries, parks, schools, municipal health care facilities), and minimize use of toxics and generation of hazardous waste.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The Urban Wildland Half Marathon & 5K was founded in 2003 to save the partnership between Wood Lake Nature Center and the Richfield Public Schools to provide environmental education curriculum to the student. The race itself has become an opportunity to demonstrate environmentally-friendly practices to all 1,550 participants and the rest of the community present at the event. All materials are either recyclable, reusable, or compostable (cups, napkins), most of the food served at the event is organic, and every aspect of the race has been considered in an effort to leave a gentle footprint on the environment. Wood Lake Nature Center's common practice is to compost all paper towels and use compostable products only when reusable ones are not an option.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Karen Shragg (City staff) | kshragg@richfieldmn.gov | 612-861-9366
1 star - Action 2:

Address concerns over consumer products and packaging through encouragement/implementation of one or more of:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Target in Richfield provides in-store plastic bag/film/wrap and MP3, cellphone, and ink responsible recycling. Wood Lake Nature Center provides year-round battery recycling as well as various events which facilitate the collection and re-use or recycling of old shoes and clothes.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Karen Shragg (City staff) | kshragg@richfieldmn.gov | 612-861-9366
1 star - Action 5:

Arrange for a residential and/or business/institutional source-separated organics collection/management program.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Randy's Environmental Services offers "blue bag" organics recycling services to their residential and commercial customers in the City.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Amy Markle (City staff) | amarkle@richfieldmn.gov | 612-861-9394
1 star - Action 7:

Improve/organize residential trash, recycling and organics collection by private and/or public operations and offer significant volume-based pricing on residential garbage and/or incentives for recycling.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
In November of 2018, the City launched a two site drop-off organics recycling program for residents to participate in and reduce waste generation. Waste is brought to SET in Rosemount. Additionally, Randy's Environmental Services offers "blue bag" organics recycling services to their residential and commercial customers in the City.
Outcome measures/metrics:
As of Jan. 2nd, 2019, there were 560 households registered, exceeding the City's initial goal of 500 registrants overall. In the program's first 6 weeks, over 2.6 tons of organic materials were recycled and diverted from traditional waste streams.
Descriptive File:
Hennepin County

Local Air Quality {BP no.23}

1 star - Action 2:

Regulate outdoor wood burning, using ordinance language, performance standards and bans as appropriate, for at least one of the following:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
601.11 of code states "Air pollution controls and regulations pursuant to Minnesota Rules, Chapter 7005 (M.P.C.A.), are hereby adopted by reference." 921.05 of the city code states, "No person may cause, allow, or permit open burning within the City except as provided in this section." with a list of exceptions following.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Wayne Kewitsch (City staff) | wkewitsch@richfieldmn.gov | (612) 243-4500
2 star - Action 3:

Conduct one or more policy or education/behavior change campaigns on the topics below and document:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City Code at 840.13 states, "No person may use tobacco, tobacco products, tobacco-related devices, electronic delivery devices, or nicotine or lobelia delivery products, as these items are defined in section 1146 of this Code, on City-owned parks, conservation areas, open spaces, or recreational facilities, including without limitation: trails within parks used for walking and biking, picnic shelters, athletic fields, and play areas. This subsection does not apply to the use of tobacco, tobacco products, tobacco-related devices, electronic delivery devices, or nicotine or lobelia delivery products inside motor vehicles parked on the premises of City-owned parks, conservation areas, open spaces or recreational facilities."
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jennifer Anderson (City staff) | jenniferanderson@richfieldmn.gov | 612-861-9881

Resilient Economic & Community Development Resilient Economic and Community Development

Benchmarks and Community Engagement {BP no.24}

3 star - Action 1:

Use a city commission, or committee to lead, coordinate, and report to and engage community members on implementation of sustainability best practices.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The annual performance management report was presented to the City's Community Services Commission (GreenStep Cities citizen advisory group) on April 17, 2018, detailing progress on various best practices as well as sustainability and resiliency goals for the city. Feedback from the Commission helps advise the City Council and City staff on issues and topics relating to recreation, parks, public works, and sustainable efforts at their monthly meetings. The City also has a staff Green Team, which was originally created to pursue Richfield's solar efforts and subsequently has focused on GreenStep Cities progress as an advisory committee.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Amy Markle (City staff) | amarkle@richfieldmn.gov | 612-861-9394
2 star - Action 2:

Organize goals/outcome measures from all city plans and report to community members data that show progress toward meeting these goals.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City participates in the Regional Indicators Initiative, which includes annual citywide metrics (GHG emissions, energy consumption, and costs) regarding energy consumption, vehicle miles traveled, solid waste management, airport usage, potable water consumption, and sanitary sewer treatment.

The first section of the City's Capital Improvement Budget and Plan includes a listing of the goals and policies of the Richfield Comprehensive Plan. Later sections describes the consistency with these goals and policies for every project to be funded.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Amy Markle (City staff) | amarkle@richfieldmn.gov | 612-861-9394
1 star - Action 4:

Conduct or support a broad sustainability education and action campaign involving:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Students from the U of M prepared a comprehensive report, “A Sustainable Home Improvement Guide for the City of Richfield,” with over 100 pages of useful tips to help homeowners become more sustainable. As directed by City staff, the scope of the guide addressed actions that were most available, easily implemented, and most cost effective. The guide’s 4 sections include: Energy Efficiency, Sustainable Supplies and Products, Sustainable Landscaping, and Water Conservation.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Julie Urban (City staff) | jurban@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619777

Green Business Development {BP no.25}

1 star - Action 2:

Create or participate in a marketing/outreach program to connect businesses with assistance providers, including utilities, who provide personalized energy, waste or sustainability audits and assistance.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City of Richfield compiled a list of resources and programs that can help businesses strengthen their sustainability practices, especially in regards to energy efficiency and consumption. These programs include audits and consulting from industry experts, individualized action plans, financial assistance through grans or loans, staff training, and more. This information was shared on city social media as well as through the Richfield Chamber of Commerce's weekly newsletter to all local business members.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
Richfield Chamber of Commerce
For more information contact:
John Stark (City staff) | jstark@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619775
1 star - Action 4:

Strengthen value-added businesses utilizing local "waste" material.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Several businesses in Richfield reuse or recycle local material including: Organic Lawns by Lunseth which sources their compost locally from MN, WI, and IA, reusing turkey litter and corn gluten that would otherwise be thrown out; and Lakewinds Food Co-op, which has both front and back of store composting systems and donates unsold food daily to the VEAP food shelf. Additionally, Richfield has provided free wood chips to residents from trees removed or trimmed from city boulevards, and occasionally from private contractors as well. This program has existed every summer for over 20 years. The City also used 100% recycled asphalt in the Met sewer project and uses it in all patching work. It is contractor practice to use some amount of recycled asphalt in projects.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Chris Link (City staff) | clink@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619174
1 star - Action 7:

Conduct or participate in a buy local campaign for community members and local businesses.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The Richfield Chamber of Commerce runs an annual "buy local" campaign in December to promote local holiday shopping, highlighting 45 businesses in Richfield. Events such as the Urban Wildland Half Marathon & 5K specifically seek out local sponsors (http://www.urbanwildland.com/sponsors.htm) to create a beneficial relationship for all involved. The City also runs a weekly summer/fall Farmers Market and a biweekly Winter Market, which is promoted through City social media as a regular opportunity to "buy local".
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
Richfield Chamber of Commerce
For more information contact:
Karen Shragg (City staff) | kshragg@richfieldmn.gov | 612-861-9366

Renewable Energy {BP no.26}

1 star - Action 1:

Adopt wind energy and/or biomass ordinances that allow, enable, or encourage appropriate renewable energy installations.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Section 544.23 of the Zoning Code states, "No building shall be so tall that its shadow is cast across more than 50 percent of land used for a single-family or two-family building between the hours of 9:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. on any day of the year. The Council may make exceptions to this requirement if the applicant can prove to the Council's satisfaction that measures have been taken to mitigate this solar access requirement, which measures may include but are not limited to obtaining the consent of the affected property owner(s)."

Students from the U of M prepared a study of the City’s zoning code with a focus on providing recommendations based on the feasibility of four environmentally sustainable practices identified as high priority by city officials in Richfield: residential wind energy, solar panels, green roofs/roof gardens, and rain gardens.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Melissa Poehlman (City staff) | MPoehlman@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619766
1 star - Action 5:

Install a public sector/municipally-owned renewable energy technology, such as solar electric (PV), wind, biomass, solar hot water/air, or micro-hydro.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Throughout 2018, the City of Richfield pursued alternative energy opportunities available for improving municipal energy supply, culminating in the installation of several solar arrays at the end of the year. The contractor, iDeal Energies, installed 6 solar arrays (3 20 kw and 3 40 kw) on several public buildings, including liquor stores, Public Works, the pool, and ice arena. The city has the option to purchase the arrays after 14 years, during which the city will pay Green 2 Solar for electricity per a reduced rate on every Xcel bill. There is guaranteed savings or net zero on energy costs. Wood Lake Nature Center also has a 7 panel array, in operation for over 10 years, which produces 1 kw a year or 10% of the building's energy usage.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
iDeal Energies, Green 2 Solar, Xcel Energy Solar Rewards Program
For more information contact:
Chris Link (City staff) | clink@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619174
2 star - Action 6:

Report installed private sector-owned renewable energy/energy efficient generation capacity with at least one of the following attributes:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
10 households have on site solar panels/arrays installed on their homes, totaling 64 kW. 119 Xcel customers also subscribe to community solar gardens, totaling 688 kW.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
Xcel Energy
For more information contact:
Russ Lupkes (City staff) | rlupkes@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619175

Local Food {BP no.27}

2 star - Action 2:

Facilitate creation of home/community gardens, chicken & bee keeping, and incorporation of food growing areas/access in multifamily residential developments.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Section 512.03 (e) of the Zoning Code defines the following as a permitted use in all zoning districts: "Horticulture/community gardens as an accessory to an established institutional use (school, church, park), provided that plants and related materials are maintained in a clean and orderly manner and that waste is disposed of appropriately."

Section 905.37 and section 906 of the city code addresses maintenance of fowl/birds and beekeeping, respectively.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Melissa Poehlman (City staff) | MPoehlman@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619766
2 star - Action 3:

Create, assist with and promote local food production/distribution within the city:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City runs a weekly summer/fall Farmers Market and a biweekly Winter Market which promote over 25 local farmers and vendors to residents of Richfield and neighboring cities. The Richfield Farmers Market is a member of the MN Farmers Market Association and Minnesota Grown.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Bonnie Hanna-Powers (City staff) | BHannapowers@richfieldmn.gov | 612-861-9362
1 star - Action 4:

Measurably increase institutional buying, and sales through groceries and restaurants.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
The City's Farmers and Winter Market are licensed to be a wholesale food handler to aggregate available product from local farmers and sell to local institutions. Richfield is the only site undertaking this process in the Metro (there are 8 total in the state).
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Bonnie Hanna-Powers (City staff) | BHannapowers@richfieldmn.gov | 612-861-9362

Climate Adaptation and Community Resilience {BP no.29}

3 star - Action 1:

Prepare to maintain public health and safety during extreme weather and climate-change-related events, while also taking a preventive approach to reduce risk for community members.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Implementation details:
Each Spring the Richfield Department of Public Safety meets with a representative from the Hennepin County Emergency Management department. The meeting focuses on updates that have been made to our plan, reviewing the Hazard Mitigation Plan, and reviewing protocols and procedures for our Emergency Operations Center along with Technology that will assist us in a Natural or Man-made disaster. The representative from Hennepin County will check off that we have met the standards and criteria established by the county and our South Metro Emergency Managers group. Jay Henthorne, Richfield Police Chief and Public Safety Director, met with Hennepin County representatives on April 12, 2018.

As part of our emergency operations plan for the city we have several established shelters located throughout the city. These primarily consist of churches, schools, and some private businesses. These shelters have been used in exercises to practice sheltering of the public and training for our staff and our Community Emergency Response Team, (CERT). We have these Shelters set up to be sustainable for two weeks with supplies and availability for additional supplies until we can move people to more of long term housing.
Outcome measures/metrics:
Descriptive File:
Hennepin County Emergency Management Department
For more information contact:
Jay Henthorne (City staff) | jhenthorne@richfieldmn.gov | 6128619828