City Detail

Background Information

City of Savage
County: Scott
Population: 32,000
GreenStep City category: B
Full-time equivalent city staff (approx.): 145
Participating township, county, school:

GreenStep Coordinator

Casey Casella
City Staff
952-882-2668
City web page relating to sustainability/GreenStep activities:
GreenStep City resolution: Click here to view the file.
GreenStep City status and date: STEP 2 ( )

City Assessment Files and City Performance Metrics

City councils pass a resolution to join the GreenStep program and are recognized at Step 1. Step 2 and Step 3 recognition levels reflect completed city actions, reported and rated below with stars (1 star = good, 2 stars = better, 3 stars = best). The Assessment File below summarizes completed city actions in a short Word file. Step 4 recognition is awarded to cities who report a minimum number of core metrics for the previous calendar year. These metrics aim to show the aggregate, quantitative results of taking multiple GreenStep actions. Step 5 cities show improvement in the Step 4 metrics. See yearly data for Steps 4&5. Additional city data can be found by reviewing information on B3 Benchmarking and Regional Indicators Initiative.

Assessment File

Best Practice Actions Underway and Completed

Completed actions are denoted by stars.

Total completed actions: 65
1 star actions: 37
2 star actions: 15
3 star actions: 8

Buildings and Lighting Buildings and Lighting

Efficient Existing Public Buildings {BP no.1}

2 star - Action 1:

Enter/update building information into the MN B3 Benchmarking database, and routinely enter monthly usage data for all city-owned buildings/infrastructure that consume energy/water.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2008
Implementation details:
Savage began reentering electricity, gas, and water consumption into the MN B3 Benchmarking website in summer of 2020 for city-owned buildings. The City had previously entered data from 2008-2014. Staff from the building services division enters the data regularly.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Once a new 2020 baseline year is established, we will monitor trends and use the data to prioritize building efficiency projects.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jay Scherer (City Staff) | jscherer@cityofsavage.com | 9528822652
1 star - Action 2:

Make no/low cost indoor lighting and operational changes in city-owned/school buildings to reduce energy costs.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2018
Implementation details:
The City continues to switch from standard fluorescent lights to more efficient LED. Examples of low cost projects include the Fire Department replaced apparatus bay and exterior lights with LED that reduced use at Station 1 in 2019, and Building Services replaced Savage Sports Dome lights with LED lights in 2020, City Hall interior LED lights, Marketplace liquor beer cooler LED lights, Library LED lights, Police Garage LED lights, Post Office LED lights, and the entire public works building and garage LED lights.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Investing in energy efficient projects accumulates annual savings on energy for the City. LED lights are more efficient and LED investment has rebate options. For example, in the Sports Dome LED project, the total project cost was $143,594.74. The City qualified for a Center for Energy and Environment (CEE) rebate of $84,694.16. This brought the project cost down to $58,900.57. Switching to LED lights is projected to save the City $29,651.76 per year. This means the total project cost of $58,900.57 is only a 2 year payback.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jay Scherer (City Staff) | jscherer@cityofsavage.com | 9528822652
3 star - Action 5:

Document that the new construction or major remodeling of a public building has met the SB 2030 energy standard or has met or qualified under a green building or energy framework.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2010
Implementation details:
The McColl Pond Environmental Learning Center (ELC) was designed through a naturally resourceful approach that kept sustainability at the forefront, but didn't sacrifice visual appeal or functionality. Powered by solar energy and geothermal systems for temperature regulations, the ELC offers comfort without adversely impacting the environment. Walls are made from wheat products, counter tops from recycled plastic, and cabinets from sunflower seeds. A vegetated rooftop collects and filters storm water. The ELC is LEED Certified gold.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jon Allen (City Staff) | jallen@cityofsavage.com | 9522243441
3 star - Action 6:

Improve the operations & maintenance of city-owned/school buildings and leased buildings by using a customized online energy efficiency tool, asset management tool, green building framework or green lease.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2020
Implementation details:
Upgraded the Building Automation System (BAS) at McColl Pond Environmental Learning Center - LEED Gold Certified. Installed new BAS at City Hall/Police Facility, and the Fire Station #1.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Jay Scherer (City Staff) | jscherer@cityofsavage.com | 9528822652
1 star - Action 7:

Install for one or more city-owned/school buildings one of the following efficiency measures:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2008
Implementation details:
City of Savage constructed the McColl Pond Environmental Learning Center (ELC). A closed loop geothermal system was designed and implemented during construction.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jon Allen (City Staff) | jallen@cityofsavage.com | 9522243441

Efficient Existing Private Buildings {BP no.2}

2 star - Action 5:

Conserve/protect drinking/groundwater resources by creating a water-wise landscaping ordinance/guidance, WaterSense purchasing program, or guidance on rainwater harvesting and home water softener use.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2020
Implementation details:
In 2020, Savage participated in a smart irrigation controller rebate for residents. Thanks to a grant awarded to the City of Savage by the Metropolitan Council and local matching funds, 50 Savage residents received a credit on their water bill for purchasing and installing an irrigation controller that reduces water usage. The credit covered 90% of the cost of the smart irrigation controller, up to $200. (For instance, if the irrigation controller costs $200, the credit would be $180).

A in-lawn irrigation system could be wasting water and money. Most sprinklers run on a timer, but they don’t take into account if the lawn “needs” watering. Irrigation systems can run too long or too often – leading to over-watering. This can be a drain on your water bill, a waste of water, and create shallow root systems that are bad for your lawn. Smart irrigation controllers – which can be purchased at most home improvement stores – act like a thermostat for your sprinkler system. They use local weather reports and forecasts to determine how much it has rained in recent days and how much it’s expected to rain in the near future. Using this information, the controller can then turn on and off automatically when it will be most effective for the lawn.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
The programs reached full capacity very quickly! As of April 2020, there have been over 50 rebates given out. We are hopeful additional grant funding will become available in the future.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jesse Carlson (City Staff) | jcarlson@cityofsavage.com | 9528822686

Efficient Outdoor Lighting and Signals {BP no.4}

3 star - Action 2:

Purchase LEDs for all future street lighting and traffic signals.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2016
Implementation details:
In 2020 the City is replacing the small amount of City owned street lights with LED (most street lights are County owned). This is not in a written policy, but rather something the Assistant Public Works Director connected with Choice Electric about four years ago.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Trent Jutting (City Staff) | tjutting@cityofsavage.com | 9522243404
3 star - Action 5:

Use LED/solar-powered lighting for a flashing sign or in a street, parking lot or park project.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2020
Implementation details:
The City has 24 LED/Solar-powered lights and signs. See attached map for locations.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Trent Jutting (City Staff) | tjutting@cityofsavage.com | 9522243404
2 star - Action 6:

Relamp/improve exterior building lighting for city-owned buildings/facilities with energy efficient, Dark-Sky compliant lighting.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2017
Implementation details:
The Building Services Division was request by City Administrator to install energy efficient outdoor lighting starting in 2017. To date there have been many upgrade projects, including:
2017: City Hall/Police parking lot
2018: Library and Post Office, ELC
2019: Depot
2020: Fire Stations 1 & 2
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Upgrades improve lumen output (light capabilities) and reduce annual operating costs. Total annual energy savings is approximately $14,400 per year.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jay Scherer (City Staff) | jscherer@cityofsavage.com | 9528822652

Land Use Land Use

Comprehensive, Climate and Energy Plans {BP no.6}

1 star - Action 1:

Adopt a comprehensive plan or (for Category B & C cities) adopt a future land use plan that was adopted by the county or a regional entity.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2017
Implementation details:
The City currently operates on the 2030 Comprehensive Plan. The City has been working on updating the 2040 Comprehensive Plan for the last three years. City Council conditionally approved the draft plan on February 3, 2020 and will adopt the final comprehensive plan following review and approval by the Metropolitan Council.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Bryan Tucker (City Staff) | btucker@cityofsavage.com | 9528822692
1 star - Action 2:

Demonstrate that regulatory ordinances comply with the comprehensive plan including but not limited to having the zoning ordinance explicitly reference the comprehensive plan as the foundational document for decision making.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2000
Implementation details:
City Code "accordance with it's adopted comprehensive plan." Ch. 151.02 section A.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Bryan Tucker (City Staff) | btucker@cityofsavage.com | 9528822692
1 star - Action 3:

Include requirements in comprehensive and/or other plans for intergovernmental coordination addressing regional land use and watershed / wellhead impacts, infrastructure, transportation, economic development and city/regional services.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2019
Implementation details:
Chapter 4 of the 2040 Comprehensive Plan details the City's plan for cooperation with other agencies.
Strategy: Recognition that the City is not alone in managing water resources within its boundaries. There are a number of other local, state, regional, and federal agencies that also have rules and regulations related to stormwater management. Through this strategy, the City has recognized these other agencies’ role in this endeavor and will cooperate and coordinate with these agencies as necessary. The WRMP is in conformance with but does not restate all other agency rules that are applicable to water quality and natural resource protection. Rules, policies, permits and guidelines associated with the following organizations also provide guidance in managing water resources:
 Black Dog Watershed Management Organization www.dakotacountyswcd.org/watersheds/blackdogwmo
 Prior Lake – Spring Lake Watershed District www.plslwd.org
 Lower Minnesota River Watershed District www.watersheddistrict.org
 Scott Watershed Management Organization www.co.scott.mn.us
 Minnesota Department of Health www.health.state.mn.us
 Minnesota Pollution Control Agency www.pca.state.mn.us
 Board of Water and Soil Resources www.bwsr.state.mn.us and the Wetland Conservation Act www.bwsr.state.mn.us/wetlands/wca/index.html
 Minnesota Department of Natural Resources www.dnr.state.mn.us
 US Army Corps of Engineers www.mvp.usace.army.mi
 Minnesota Department of Agriculture www.mda.state.mn.us
 Scott County Soil and Water Conservation District www.scottswcd.org

Additionally, the Natural Resources Operational Procedures lists various partners and contacts including State departments, County, watershed, university, tribal government, and volunteers in the community.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Bryan Tucker (City Staff) | btucker@cityofsavage.com | 9528822692

Mixed Uses {BP no.8}

1 star - Action 3:

Modify a planned unit development ordinance to emphasize mixed use development, to limit residential PUDs to areas adjacent to commercial development, and/or to add sustainability features.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2000
Implementation details:
The City of Savage has a mixed use district that would accommodate these provisions:
City Code Planned Unit Development, Section 152.420 (Purpose) and Section 152.429 (Mixed Use District)
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Bryan Tucker (City Staff) | btucker@cityofsavage.com | 9528822692
2 star - Action 5:

Have a downtown zoning district that allows residential and compatible commercial development.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2000
Implementation details:
The City of Savage is home to a unique and historic downtown in the northeast part of the City. The C-3 Downtown Development District is designed to accommodate both residential and commercial uses. Details of the C-3 district are in City Code 152.225-152.230. The Code specifically lists uses allowed in commercial districts (which the C-3 is designated as) in City Code 152.171 (uses allowed in Commercial Districts).
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Bryan Tucker (City Staff) | btucker@cityofsavage.com | 9528822692

Efficient Highway- and Auto-Oriented Development {BP no.9}

1 star - Action 1:

Establish design goals for at least one highway/auto-oriented corridor/cluster.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2019
Implementation details:
A series of improvements have been recommended for the east-west segment of Trunk Highway (TH) 13 as it passes through the City of Savage. Metropolitan Council has identified the TH 13 corridor as a focus area in the 2017 Principal Intersection Arterial Conversion Study. The TH 13 Corridor is also a high priority in the Scott County 2040 Transportation Plan and has been identified by the County as a priority corridor for utilizing Scott County Transportation Sales Tax revenues. A variety of planning and preliminary design studies have occurred over the last 20 years in the TH 13 corridor.

Specifically for Savage design goals, Chapter 2 (Land Use) of the 2040 Comprehensive Plan details design goals as part of the Truck Highway 13 Economic Development Study. The purpose of the TH 13 study was to develop a plan for corridor beautification and enhancement including short- and long-term aesthetic improvements and overall structural or land use changes. The study was intended to develop the means by which immediate image enhancements could be made in the context of longer-term land use changes.
Short term strategies from the study: Shorter-term strategies include screening and landscaping to minimize the most intrusive visual impacts on drivers. Another strategy is to create an identity for the corridor. Yet another is to develop financial incentives for screening and landscaping. This palette of opportunities will serve as the basis for corridor image enhancement.
Long term strategies from the study: Long-term structural land use change will necessarily be done by ordinance based on the City’s vision for the corridor as established by its comprehensive plan. Other long-term strategies include aesthetic changes including a streetscape appropriate for highway beautification. Redevelopment is yet another long-term strategy for areas where property values continue to decline in real dollars.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
MN Department of Transportation, Met Council, Scott County
For more information contact:
Bryan Tucker (City Staff) | btucker@cityofsavage.com | 9528822692

Design for Natural Resource Conservation {BP no.10}

1 star - Action 1:

Conduct a Natural Resource Inventory or Assessment (NRI or NRA); incorporate protection of priority natural systems or resources such as groundwater through the subdivision or development process.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2012
Implementation details:
Staff developed a Natural Resources Operations Procedures inventory and storymap of the City's natural features. Savage is filled with unique and beautiful natural areas. Staff follows the operations procedures to protect and preserve these wild areas.

Note: the Natural Operations Procedures is currently being updated by staff. The updated version will be uploaded soon.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Continuing educational procedures for assessments and management of natural areas.
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Jon Allen (City Staff) | jallen@cityofsavage.com | 9522243441
2 star - Action 3:

For cities within metropolitan areas, incorporate woodland best management practices addressing protection of wooded areas into zoning or development review.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 1996
Implementation details:
The City of Savage first adopted a Tree Preservation Ordinance in 1996. In the City Code, Chapter 102 details Urban Forest and Shade Tree Management.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Ordinance guides development resulting in preservation of high value trees.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jon Allen (City Staff) | jallen@cityofsavage.com | 9522243441
2 star - Action 5:

Preserve environmentally sensitive, community-valued land by placing a conservation easement on city lands, and by encouraging/funding private landowners to place land in conservation easements.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2010
Implementation details:
The City of Savage has a Conservation Easement recorded with grant aid at the McColl Pond Environmental Learning Center (ELC).
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Protects unique and rare resource ("Big Woods" remnant) adjacent to wetlands.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jon Allen (City Staff) | jallen@cityofsavage.com | 9522243441
1 star - Action 6:

Conserve natural, cultural, historic resources by adopting or amending city codes and ordinances to support sustainable sites, including roadsides, and environmentally protective land use development.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2019
Implementation details:
The City of Savage is home to many unique and historic resources. Details of theses features and strategies to protect them are outlined in the 2040 Comprehensive Plan Chapter 4 (Natural Resources). One to highlight is the Savage Fen Wetland Complex. The Savage Fen Wetland Complex is located in the City of Savage between the Minnesota River and the ancient River Warren bluffline and between TH 13 and Quentin Avenue. It is the largest calcareous fen in Minnesota, comprising of approximately 640 acres. This type of wetland is a rarity and contains some plant species found in few or no other locations. Its special characteristics are a product of the groundwater flowing through the upgradient aquifer and glacial till in this particular location.

Specific to City Code, Chapter 152 Sections 152.400 - 152.408 details the Environmental Overlay Districts. The purpose of this chapter is to protect environmentally sensitive areas within the City. There are currently three overlay districts:
1. Shoreland Overlay District
2. Wetland Overlay District
3. Bluffland Overlay District
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
MN Department of Natural Resources
For more information contact:
Bryan Tucker (City Staff) | btucker@cityofsavage.com | 9528822692

Transportation Transportation

Living & Complete Streets {BP no.11}

1 star - Action 1:

Adopt a complete streets policy, or a living streets policy, which addresses landscaping and stormwater.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: In Progress
Implementation details:
Comp 2040 plans mentions following complete streets policy. Pg. 42
Will be approved by Council in Aug (6 month Met Council review)
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Casey Casella (City Staff) | ccasella@cityofsavage.com | 952-882-2668
1 star - Action 4:

Identify, prioritize and remedy complete streets gaps and lack of connectivity/safety within your road network by, for example, adding a bike route/lane, truck route, sidewalk or mid-block alley.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2018
Implementation details:
2018 approved Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan.
Specific example: completed sidewalk connection on McColl Dr to Burnsville
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Casey Casella (City Staff) | ccasella@cityofsavage.com | 952-882-2668
1 star - Action 5:

Identify and remedy street-trail gaps between city streets and off-road trails/bike trails to better facilitate walking and biking.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2018
Implementation details:
Example: Completed trail connection from Providence subdivision to Community Park
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Casey Casella (City Staff) | ccasella@cityofsavage.com | 952-882-2668

Environmental Management Environmental Management

Sustainable Purchasing {BP no.15}

2 star - Action 1:

Adopt a sustainable purchasing policy or administrative guidelines/practices directing that the city purchase at least:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2020
Implementation details:
The City of Savage sets procedures for purchasing through a Purchasing Guidelines and Procedures Policy. Staff initiated an update to the policy in November of 2020 to include Purchasing Sustainability Requirements (page 9). This section requires EnergyStar certified equipment and appliances, and paper containing at least 30% post-consumer recycled content. The update to the policy was approved by City Council on 11/2/2020.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Casey Casella (City Staff) | ccasella@cityofsavage.com | 952-882-2668
1 star - Action 2:

Purchase energy used by city government - via the municipal utility, green tags, community solar garden, 3rd party - with a higher renewable percentage than required by Minnesota law.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2017
Implementation details:
The City has a Community Solar Services Agreement with SunShare (now Cypress Creek Renewables ) started in 2017 and valid for 25 years.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Brad Larson (City Staff) | blarson@cityofsavage.com | 9528822641
1 star - Action 4:

Require purchase of U.S. EPA WaterSense-certified products.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2020
Implementation details:
The City of Savage sets procedures for purchasing through a Purchasing Guidelines and Procedures Policy. Staff initiated an update to the policy in November of 2020 to include Purchasing Sustainability Requirements (page 9). This section requires U.S. EPA WaterSense-certified products. The update to the policy was approved by City Council on 11/2/2020.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Casey Casella (City Staff) | ccasella@cityofsavage.com | 952-882-2668
1 star - Action 7:

Lower the environmental footprint of meetings and events in the city.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2020
Implementation details:
The City Council and Resident Commissions at Savage operate on electronic packets, published through Dropbox or email. Council members have electronic devices to view the packet at meetings. In 2020 the City upgraded technology in the Council Chambers to allow hybrid in-person/virtual meetings to allow for some to participate virtually.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Casey Casella (City Staff) | ccasella@cityofsavage.com | 952-882-2668

Community Forests and Soils {BP no.16}

1 star - Action 1:

Certify as a Tree City USA.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 1993
Implementation details:
The City has been a Tree City USA for 27 years.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Creates awareness and value of urban trees within parks.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jon Allen (City Staff) | jallen@cityofsavage.com | 9522243441
3 star - Action 2:

Adopt best practices for urban tree planting/quality; require them in private developments and/or use them in at least one development project.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2004
Implementation details:
The City adopted an Urban Forest & Shade Tree Management Comprehensive Manual. The best practices are also codified in Savage City Code Ch. 102.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
The program promotes incentives for the preservation of trees.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jon Allen (City Staff) | jallen@cityofsavage.com | 9522243441
1 star - Action 4:

Maximize tree planting along your main downtown street or throughout the city.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2000
Implementation details:
Beginning in 2000, street reconstruction projects included boulevard and right of way tree planting. This included the Hamilton District downtown area.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
City improvement projects include provisions for right-of-way and yard tree planting. The helps maintain and/or improving the property and aesthetic value.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jon Allen (City Staff) | jallen@cityofsavage.com | 9522243441
2 star - Action 5:

Adopt a tree preservation or native landscaping ordinance.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2004
Implementation details:
The City adopted the urban forest and shade tree management ordinance in 2004, City Code Chapter 102.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
This is documented in the tree preservation plans that are submitted during the development review and approval process.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jon Allen (City Staff) | jallen@cityofsavage.com | 9522243441
3 star - Action 6:

Build community capacity to protect existing trees by one or more of:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 1993
Implementation details:
a. Public Works staff members are recertified annually as tree inspectors. Training provides recognition of hazardous trees and proper tree care procedures.
b. Volunteers assist with the annual Arbor Day program, educational activities, and tree planting.
c. The City adopted an Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) Management plan in 2013. The City also offers a EAB treatment program for residents.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Provides annual training for tree care, proper procedures, and knowledge of hazardous trees.

When grant funds for EAB management are available, cities with EAB plans rank highest and are most likely to be awarded funds. Also, Informs property owners of EAB status and management options.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jon Allen (City Staff) | jallen@cityofsavage.com | 9522243441

Stormwater Management {BP no.17}

1 star - Action 1:

Adopt and use Minnesota's Minimal Impact Design Standards (MIDS).

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2021
Implementation details:
The City uses the design guidelines and standards that are outlined in the Minimal Impact Design Standards (MIDs). The City will look at ways it can expand the use of MIDs in 2021 by doing the Stormwater Management Assessment. For areas that discharge to sensitive resources such as Eagle Creek and Savage Fen the City has the following standards.

Water Quality
For areas that create greater than 10,000 square feet of new impervious the water quality requirements are as follows:
• All projects shall have a net decrease in Total Phosphorus (TP) and Total Suspended Solids (TSS) to receiving waters from existing conditions. For new development projects, the decrease in TP and TSS shall be 60 percent and 80 percent, respectively from existing conditions.

Volume Control
For areas that create greater than 10,000 square feet of new impervious the volume requirements are as follows:
• New developments that create 10,000 square feet or more of new impervious surface on sites without restrictions, the post-construction stormwater runoff volume retained on-site shall be equivalent to 1.0 inch of runoff from impervious surfaces.
• Redevelopment projects on sites without restrictions that create 10,000 square feet or more of new and/or fully reconstructed impervious surfaces shall capture and retain on-site 1.1 inches of runoff from the new and/or fully reconstructed impervious surfaces.
• Linear projects on sites without restrictions that create 10,000 square feet or greater of new and/or fully reconstructed impervious surfaces shall capture and retain the larger of the following:
1. 0.55 inch of runoff from the new and fully reconstructed impervious surfaces.
2. 1.1 inches of runoff from the net increase in impervious area.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Number of projects constructed/reconstructed using MIDS standards.
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Jesse Carlson (City Staff) | jcarlson@cityofsavage.com | 9528822686
3 star - Action 3:

Adopt by ordinance one or more of the following stormwater infiltration/management strategies to reduce impervious surface:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2021
Implementation details:
For sites less than 1 acre this City requires that stormwater be retained on-site with a water quality volume of 1.1 inches of runoff from all new impervious surfaces and fully redeveloped impervious surfaces. This standard is currently in-place for areas that discharge to the Savage Fen a calcareous fen or Eagle Creek a designated trout stream.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Reduction in TSS and TP entering surface waters.
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Jesse Carlson (City Staff) | jcarlson@cityofsavage.com | 9528822686
3 star - Action 5:

Adopt and implement guidelines or design standards/incentives for at least one of the following stormwater infiltration/reuse practices:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2015
Implementation details:
For sites with 5,000 square feet of new impervious, but less that 1 acre of total project drainage area the infiltration standard is to provide a volume control that is equal to 0.5 inches of runoff from all new impervious surfaces.

For sites with 1 acre or greater of new and fully reconstructed impervious the infiltration standard is to provide volume control that is equal to 1.0 inches of runoff.

For linear projects, the water quality volume must be calculated as the larger of one 1.0 inches times the new impervious surface or 0.5 inches times the sum of the new and the fully reconstructed impervious surface, whichever is greater.

For areas within the High Value Resource Areas (HVRA) as defined by the Lower Minnesota River Watershed District (LMRWD) that create greater than 10,000 square feet of new impervious the volume requirements are as follows:
• New developments that create 10,000 square feet or more of new impervious surface on sites without restrictions, the post-construction stormwater runoff volume retained on-site shall be equivalent to 1.0 inch of runoff from impervious surfaces.
• Redevelopment projects on sites without restrictions that create 10,000 square feet or more of new and/or fully reconstructed impervious surfaces shall capture and retain on-site 1.1 inches of runoff from the new and/or fully reconstructed impervious surfaces.
• Linear projects on sites without restrictions that create 10,000 square feet or greater of new and/or fully reconstructed impervious surfaces shall capture and retain the larger of the following:
1. 0.55 inch of runoff from the new and fully reconstructed impervious surfaces.
2. 1.1 inches of runoff from the net increase in impervious area.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
These standards will result in a reduction of runoff volume, total phosphorus, and total suspended solids entering receiving waters.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jesse Carlson (City Staff) | jcarlson@cityofsavage.com | 9528822686
1 star - Action 6:

Reduce de-icing and dust suppressant salt use to prevent permanent surfacewater and groundwater pollution.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2019
Implementation details:
In 2019 the City purchased a new piece of equipment that is estimated to reduce salt use by 30 percent per lane mile. The new piece of equipment is a precision applicator that can better target the areas where being applied.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
The City anticipates that the use of this new equipment will reduce its salt usage by 30% per lane mile used. Preliminary results show the new piece of equipment is resulting in an overall reduction in salt being applied.
Descriptive File:
Funding assistance from the BWSR clean water fund, watershed-based implementation funding program.
For more information contact:
Jesse Carlson (City Staff) | jcarlson@cityofsavage.com | 9528822686

Parks and Trails {BP no.18}

Not rated - Action 1:

Make improvements within your city's system of parks, offroad trails and open spaces.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2018
Implementation details:
The City developed a pedestrian and bicycle master plan in 2018. The plan identified improvements that will over time make improvements within the City's parks, trails, water features, and during new development. The plan can be viewed on the City website.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
The purpose of the Savage Pedestrian and Bicycle Master Plan is to provide a framework for maintaining and expanding the sidewalk and trail system, taking advantage of the ongoing evolution of non-motorized transportation facilities and increased walking and biking trends nationwide. This plan provides direction for future implementation and maintenance work of the city’s sidewalk and trail system in the following areas.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Greg Boatman (City Staff) | gboatman@cityofsavage.com | 9522243423
2 star - Action 2:

Plan and budget for a network of parks, green spaces, water features and trails for areas where new development is planned.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2020
Implementation details:
The City has completed its 2040 Comprehensive plan. The 2040 Comprehensive plan is a master plan that identifies several key strategies that result in the City preserving parks, green spaces, water features, and trails. The City code then preserves these requirements to ensure that these areas will be set aside during new development. The following are key areas of the code that that should be considered as a part of this BMP:
- Chapter 151, Section 151.13, Park Dedication
- Chapter 152, Sections 152.320-152.322, Preservation Open Space District
- Chapter 152, Sections 152.400-152.408, Environmental Overlay Districts

Bicycle and Pedestrian Plan developed in 2018.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Planning for these areas as a part of new development will prevent the City from having to invest in improvements after-the-fact.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Bryan Tucker (City Staff) | btucker@cityofsavage.com | 9528822692
1 star - Action 4:

Adopt low-impact design standards in parks and trails that infiltrate or retain all 2 inch, 24-hour stormwater events on site.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2007
Implementation details:
The City looks to provide stormater management for new and existing park areas. Examples include Hollywood Park, Hidden Valley Park, and Environmental Learning Center (ELC). The City developed the ELC in 2007 and developed a stormwater plan that infiltrates a 10-year design storm through the use of a green roofs, pervious pavements, and rain gardens.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Reducing stormater runoff through volume management will decrease the demand on City stormwater infrastructure as well as improve water quality.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jon Allen (City Staff) | jallen@cityofsavage.com | 9522243441
2 star - Action 5:

Create park/city land management standards/practices that maximize at least one of the following:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2007
Implementation details:
The City of Savage has 29 areas that are managed using native vegetation. These areas are typically within parks and reduce the need to perform weekly mowing, etc. The McColl Pond Environmental Learning Center also includes the installation of a pollinator garden.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Areas that are converted to natural areas require less intensive management and resources from the City.
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Jon Allen (City Staff) | jallen@cityofsavage.com | 9522243441

Surface Water {BP no.19}

1 star - Action 1:

Consistently monitor surface water quality/clarity and report findings to community members.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2000
Implementation details:
The City began monitoring the water quality in McColl Pond in 2020 and the City has been monitoring 4 stormwater ponds throughout the City starting in 2019. The Credit River and Eagle Creek are currently monitored by the Metropolitan Council since the early 200s. The City will evaluate the water quality data to help guide future decisions regarding the management and protection of its water resources.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
The continuous monitoring at Eagle Creek and Credit River shows long-term water quality trends regarding stream flows and chlorides, which may make the City realize how changes in land use or land use practices might be impacting overall stream health, etc.
Descriptive File:
Metropolitan Council, Scott Soil and Water Conservation District
For more information contact:
Jesse Carlson (City Staff) | jcarlson@cityofsavage.com | 9528822686
1 star - Action 4:

Adopt a shoreland ordinance for all river and lake shoreland areas.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: Shoreland Regulation 2001, Flood Plain Overlay District 1974
Implementation details:
Shoreland Overlay District
The City adopted a shoreland overlay district in the early 2000s. The shoreland overlay districts includes information on percent allowable impervious, permissible uses, setbacks, lot sizes, and allowable accessory structures, etc.

Floodplain Overlay District
Savage has participated in the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) since 1974. On January 19, 2021, the City council adopted the new FEMA maps that were updated in 2011 with the final letter of determination being received by the City on August 12, 2020.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Shoreland Regulations
Adoption of shoreland regulations results in the protection of habitat, water quality, and the preservation of property values. It minimizes the resources a community might need to spend on shoreline restoration or water quality improvement projects.

Flood Plain Overlay District
Communities’ participation allows property owners to purchase flood insurance. Flood insurance is a requirement for properties where the principal structure is in a flood hazard area and there is a federally secured mortgage.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Bryan Tucker (City Staff) | btucker@cityofsavage.com | 9528822692

Efficient Water and Wastewater Systems {BP no.20}

1 star - Action 1:

Compare the energy use and financial performance of your facilities with other peer plants using standardized, free tools.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2008
Implementation details:
Our facilities are designed on an industry-standard but have unique treatment techniques for our raw water conditions. Power consumption is measured and observed on a daily and monthly basis depending on operating conditions, using MVEC's metering and our power consumption totalizer WTP2. Currently, we initiate seasonal prestart up electrical checks annually, and in depth analysis every other year to determine our electrical systems condition and efficiency. Our comparison then would be the cost per gallon of water produced.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
A reduction in power consumption vs. the gallons of water produced through these energy-saving systems.
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Michael Klimers (City Staff) | mklimers@cityofsavage.com | 952-224-3442
1 star - Action 2:

Plan and budget for motor maintenance and upgrades to assure the most energy efficient, durable and appropriate equipment is available when upgrades or break downs occur.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2008
Implementation details:
Preventative maintenance is standard procedure, including annual assessments and industrial preventative maintenance practices. Motors that are found to be defective are repaired or replaced through budgeted expenses.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Routine preventative maintenance prevents unpredicted expenses. The City is currently budgeting appropriate resources to keep up with the maintenance needs of its aging infrastructure. This is achieved by using standard industry analytical tools and technical electrical services, testing, and training.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Michael Klimers (City Staff) | mklimers@cityofsavage.com | 952-224-3442
1 star - Action 3:

Establish an on-going budget and program for decreasing inflow and infiltration into sewer lines and losses in drinking water systems.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2008
Implementation details:
Annually budgeted expense for sewer system I/I remediation issues to include televising of gravity sewer lines and manholes in project areas– repairs are initiated annually at these sites to minimize I/I issues. Our water distribution system is scheduled annually for a leak survey. Any deficiencies are corrected at that point.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Reduction in the gallons of clean water treated at the downstream wastewater treatment plant.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Michael Klimers (City Staff) | mklimers@cityofsavage.com | 952-224-3442
1 star - Action 4:

Optimize energy and chemical use at drinking water / wastewater facilities and decrease chloride in wastewater discharges.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2008
Implementation details:
The City uses SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) control panels system monitoring. The computer-based SCADA equipment provides information that makes it possible for utility personnel to more effectively monitor and maintain the sanitary (lift stations) and water distribution systems.

Water Treatment Plant Efficiency
The City of Savage standard operating procedure is to use state of the art equipment that is programmable logic controlled, scaled linearly to flow, and calibrated to an individual wells chemical makeup characteristics. This has resulted in immediate savings and chemical reduction to the City.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Michael Klimers (City Staff) | mklimers@cityofsavage.com | 952-224-3442

Septic Systems {BP no.21}

1 star - Action 3:

Clarify/establish one or more responsible management entities for the proper design, siting, installation, operation, monitoring and maintenance of septic systems.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 1971
Implementation details:
Over 8,700 homes in Scott County rely on a septic system for their on-site wastewater treatment. A septic system is a large and important investment. It is vital that homeowners understand how their system works, and that they do what they can to extend the life of their Septic System. The positive benefits of a properly functioning and long-lasting septic system are both financial and environmental.

All ISTS system installed in Scott County requires a permit/license through Scott County and compliance inspection. Inspection/enforcement of failing systems in Scott County are inspected by the County and not by the City of Savage.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
The number of compliant inspection systems.
Descriptive File:
Scott County
For more information contact:
Jesse Carlson (City Staff) | jcarlson@cityofsavage.com | 9528822686
1 star - Action 4:

Adopt a subsurface sewage treatment system ordinance based on the Association of Minnesota Counties' model ordinance.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 1971
Implementation details:
Over 8,700 homes in Scott County rely on a septic system for their on-site wastewater treatment. A septic system is a large and important investment. It is vital that homeowners understand how their system works, and that they do what they can to extend the life of their Septic System. The positive benefits of a properly functioning and long-lasting septic system are both financial and environmental.

All ISTS system installed in Scott County requires a permit/license through Scott County. Inspection/enforcement of failing systems in Scott County are inspected by the County and not by the City of Savage.

This is enforced through the Scott County Ordinance No. 4.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
The number of compliant septic systems.
Descriptive File:
Scott County
For more information contact:
Jesse Carlson (City Staff) | jcarlson@cityofsavage.com | 9528822686
Not rated - Action 7:

Arrange for assistance to commercial, retail and industrial businesses with water use reduction, pollution prevention and pretreatment prior to discharge to septics.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2020
Implementation details:
No commercial, retail, and industrial businesses on septic systems in the City of Savage.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
No pollution will result as discharges from commercial, retail, and industrial businesses as no systems are currently on individual septic systems.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jesse Carlson (City Staff) | jcarlson@cityofsavage.com | 9528822686

Sustainable Consumption and Waste {BP no.22}

1 star - Action 2:

Address concerns over consumer products and packaging through encouragement/implementation of one or more of:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2020
Implementation details:
The City hosts Recycle day, an annual event promoting various ways residents can recycle materials. The City collects yard waste, appliances, electronics, and other miscellaneous items. Hosting these events promotes recycling and minimizes the amount of material that might get a place along City right-of-ways.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Amount of solid waste recycled annually.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jon Allen (City Staff) | jallen@cityofsavage.com | 9522243441
2 star - Action 5:

Arrange for a residential and/or business/institutional source-separated organics collection/management program.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2021
Implementation details:
The Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community has a free compost program for Scott County residents. Savage is in Scott County and its residents are eligible. This is a new, free program allowing them to drop off food waste for composting at the Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community’s Organics Recycling Facility. The program is supported by a $25,000 grant provided by Scott County.

Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
The program is new - more to come on measures!
Descriptive File:
Scott County, Shakopee Mdewakanton Sioux Community
For more information contact:
Casey Casella (City Staff) | ccasella@cityofsavage.com | 952-882-2668

Local Air Quality {BP no.23}

1 star - Action 2:

Regulate outdoor wood burning, using ordinance language, performance standards and bans as appropriate, for at least one of the following:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2013
Implementation details:
The City of Savage requires a recreational fire permit. This permit allows family and friends to enjoy small recreational fires while being considerate of neighbors and allows only burning clean dry wood. Burning grass, leaves, and paper/trash are illegal and a violation of the recreational fire permit. The permit requires you to be aware of wind direction to avoid smoke blowing into your neighbors’ windows, and make sure the fire is completely out before leaving.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
The City requires a recreational fire permit application that encourages a reduction in fires that contain non-healthy combustible materials, such as garbage, etc.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Andrew Slama (City Staff) | aslama@cityofsavage.com | 952-224-3470

Resilient Economic & Community Development Resilient Economic and Community Development

Benchmarks and Community Engagement {BP no.24}

1 star - Action 1:

Inclusive and Coordinated Decision-Making: Use a city commission or committee to lead, coordinate, report to and engage community members on the identification and equitable implementation of sustainability best practices.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2020
Implementation details:
Internal staff green team launched in October 2020.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Casey Casella (City Staff) | ccasella@cityofsavage.com | 952-882-2668
1 star - Action 2:

Communicating Progress on Goals: Organize goals/outcome measures from all city plans (social, environmental, economic) and report to community members data that show progress toward meeting these goals.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2015
Implementation details:
The City of Savage participates in the Office of the State Auditor Local Government Performance Measures Reports. Annually, the City submits our report to the OSA. The most recent copy of the performance measures is posted publically to the City's website on the Budget Page.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Casey Casella (City Staff) | ccasella@cityofsavage.com | 952-882-2668
1 star - Action 4:

Public Education for Action: Conduct or support a broad sustainability education and action campaign, building on existing city & community relationships, networks & events involving:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2020
Implementation details:
Pet waste is more than smelly and unsightly - it can be a serious public health and environmental concern. This not only contaminates our water systems, but it can cause harmful algae and aquatic weeds to grow, and affects our overall water quality. Savage Parks and Recreation Division launched a social media campaign to remind dog-owning residents to clean up after their dog whether they are walking at a public park or in their back yard. Savage residents were encouraged to take the #SavageScoopThePoop pledge and post a picture on social media of their dog(s) using #SavageScoopThePoop. The campaign was to help raise awareness and help reduce pet waste in Savage.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Emily Gunderson (City Staff) | egunderson@cityofsavage.com | 9528822655
2 star - Action 6:

Engaging the Next Generation: Engage wide representation of community youth and college students by creating opportunities to participate in city government (including commissions).

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2019
Implementation details:
The City of Savage accepts junior and senior high school students living in Savage, who are interested in learning more about local government and serving on one of four City Commissions. Students serve a one year term. Applicants are interviewed and appointed by the Savage City Council.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Casey Casella (City Staff) | ccasella@cityofsavage.com | 952-882-2668

Green Business Development {BP no.25}

1 star - Action 2:

Create or participate in a marketing/outreach program to connect businesses with assistance providers, including utilities, who provide personalized energy, waste or sustainability audits and assistance.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2020
Implementation details:
The City of Savage runs a Business Outreach Program to connect City staff to businesses. In 2021, staff plans to bring specific sustainability programs and information to the business meetings.

The City also provides a wealth of resources for how business can "Go Green" on the Business Resources page on the City website (Link below). There are resources on energy, recycling and water.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Casey Casella (City Staff) | ccasella@cityofsavage.com | 952-882-2668
2 star - Action 5:

Lower the environmental and health risk footprint of a brownfield remediation/redevelopment project beyond regulatory requirements; report brightfield projects.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2019
Implementation details:
7639 Highway 13 W was the site of an former gas station and bulk oil distribution site in Savage. Over the years, there had been prospects interested in the site, but the perceived and real costs associated with soil remediation had prohibited redevelopment. The City purchased the property in 2016 in order to address soil issues and prepare the site for redevelopment. After work began to correct soil conditions, additional unreported leaking underground storage tanks were found which were removed by the City. In total, the City invested over $1,000,000 to correct the contaminated soils and prepare the site for redevelopment. After the City’s efforts to address the environmental concerns the site was redeveloped to a blend of office, showroom and warehouse space that recently opened in 2019.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Brad Larson (City Staff) | blarson@cityofsavage.com | 9528822641
Not rated - Action 7:

Conduct or participate in a buy local campaign for community members and local businesses.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2015
Implementation details:
The City frequently promotes the local farmers market seasonally via social and print media and has done so since the farmers market began many years ago. The City is a strong partner of the Chamber of Commerce. The Chamber offices in City Hall and the City website links to the Chamber of Commerce website.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Emily Gunderson (City Staff) | egunderson@cityofsavage.com | 9528822655

Renewable Energy {BP no.26}

Not rated - Action 4:

Support a community solar garden or help community members participate in a community renewable energy project by:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2017
Implementation details:
The City has a Community Solar Services Agreement with SunShare (now Cypress Creek Renewables ) started in 2017 and valid for 25 years.

See action 15.2.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Brad Larson (City Staff) | blarson@cityofsavage.com | 9528822641
1 star - Action 5:

Install a public sector/municipally-owned renewable energy technology, such as solar electric (PV), wind, biomass, solar hot water/air, or micro-hydro.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2011
Implementation details:
The McColl Pond Environmental Learning and Event Center (ELC) is powered by solar energy and geothermal systems for temperature regulations. The geothermal system was installed in 2009 and the solar energy system installation was completed in 2011.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jon Allen (City Staff) | jallen@cityofsavage.com | 9522243441

Local Food {BP no.27}

1 star - Action 2:

Facilitate creation of home/community gardens, chicken & bee keeping, and incorporation of food growing areas/access in multifamily and residential developments.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2014
Implementation details:
The City of Savage allows keeping of chickens and bees in City Code Chapter 91 (Animal Control). Section 91.04 details keeping of farm animals, inlcuding chickens and bees, according to regulations in the City Code. This keeping of farm animals is a permitted accessory use in all resdiential districts, including single family and multi family.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Bryan Tucker (City Staff) | btucker@cityofsavage.com | 9528822692
2 star - Action 3:

Create, assist with and promote local food production/distribution within the city:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2012
Implementation details:
City of Savage supports a farmers market (St.Paul Farmers Market) held every Sunday June through October in the City public parking lot in downtown Savage.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Emily Gunderson (City Staff) | egunderson@cityofsavage.com | 9528822655

Climate Adaptation and Community Resilience {BP no.29}

2 star - Action 1:

Prepare to maintain public health and safety during extreme weather and climate-change-related events, while also taking a preventive approach to reduce risk for community members.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2021
Implementation details:
The City of Savage uses an Emergency Operations Plan developed for situations specifically like those produced by catastrophic weather events. The plan is updated by the City's Chief of Police in order to maintain it to standards set by the State of Minnesota and Scott County. Extreme weather events are among the most likely emergencies and specific precautions and policies are outlined to respond to such events. Responsibilities for every type of emergency event are assigned to city staff members. One item the City went above and beyond on was to develop a flip chart version of the preparedness plan for all employees to keep at their work stations. The purpose is to present the procedures in a quick, bullet format for use during an emergency.

The City of Savage partners with Scott County in emergency preparedness efforts. Scott County runs an Emergency Management and Homeland Security program which addresses anything from severe weather to terrorist acts. For residents, the County identified community shelters that can be used to provide heating or cooling or other areas of refuge to residents in time of need. The City's Emergency Manager attends regular meetings with other municipal and county officials. Through this partnership, Savage residents and businesses have access to the Code Red Weather Warning service which informs them via text or phone call about severe weather conditions including, but not limited to, tornadoes, hail, floods, blizzards, and extreme heat and cold.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Rodney Seurer (City Staff) | rseurer@cityofsavage.com | 952882-2608
1 star - Action 5:

Protect public buildings and natural/constructed infrastructure to reduce physical damage and sustain their function during extreme weather events.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2020
Implementation details:
The City of Savage at a minimum requires buildings to have a minimum of 1 foot of separation from the proposed 1 percent chance storm flood elevation and to have 1 foot of freeboard from a suitable emergency overflow. This level of protection will prevent buildings from being flooded during extreme weather events that might occur during snowmelt or due to excess rainfall.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jesse Carlson (City Staff) | jcarlson@cityofsavage.com | 9528822686
Not rated - Action 7:

Protect water supply and wastewater treatment facilities to reduce physical damage and sustain their function during extreme weather events.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed: 2020
Implementation details:
The City of Savage utilities division currently uses SCADA and WIN - 911 as our water and sewer operations oversight software. This is a industry standard package that was developed by Wonderware factory that allows industry standard development for our water and sewer system needs with our particular operations parameters. This includes all emergency stand by generators sites. Our operations can be monitored and adjusted remotely. This software package also has several layers of security and 2 point authentication for someone to make a change with proper authorization codes, these are unique to an individual. Our system is set up with several firewalls and requires our MIS department authenticates any outside communication as legitimate.

Our system as designed has building and security integrated in our present system with several additions for our water and lift station sites planned for 2021. As designed 10 staff members are immediately notified of any adverse condition. All necessary state or federally mandated reporting is completed in automation on a daily, weekly, monthly or yearly basis. We are a self contained system designed and built to industry standard periodically reviewed and updated as needed.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Michael Klimers (City Staff) | mklimers@cityofsavage.com | 952-224-3442