City Detail

Background Information

City of Hopkins
County: Hennepin
Population: 17481
GreenStep City category: A
Full-time equivalent city staff (approx.): 102
Participating township, county, school:

GreenStep Coordinator

Pam Hove
City Staff
952-548-6351
City web page relating to sustainability/GreenStep activities:
GreenStep City resolution: Click here to view the file.
GreenStep City status and date: STEP 3 ( )

City Assessment Files and City Performance Metrics

City councils pass a resolution to join the GreenStep program and are recognized at Step 1. Step 2 and Step 3 recognition levels reflect completed city actions, reported and rated below with stars (1 star = good, 2 stars = better, 3 stars = best). The Assessment File below summarizes completed city actions in a short Word file. Step 4 recognition is awarded to cities who report a minimum number of core metrics for the previous calendar year. These metrics aim to show the aggregate, quantitative results of taking multiple GreenStep actions. Step 5 cities show improvement in the Step 4 metrics. See yearly data for Steps 4&5. Additional city data can be found by reviewing information on B3 Benchmarking and Regional Indicators Initiative.

Assessment File

Best Practice Actions Underway and Completed

Completed actions are denoted by stars.

Total completed actions: 46
1 star actions: 21
2 star actions: 12
3 star actions: 10

Buildings and Lighting Buildings and Lighting

Efficient Existing Public Buildings {BP no.1}

3 star - Action 1:

Enter building information into the Minnesota B3 Benchmarking database and routinely enter monthly energy, water use data for all city-owned buildings.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Hopkins began entering data into the Minnesota B3 benchmarking database in 2009 and continually updates the Minnesota B3 database. The City then uses the information to assess energy efficiency in all city-owned buildings.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Chuck Autio (City staff) | Cautio@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6378
3 star - Action 2:

Make no/low cost indoor lighting and operational changes in city-owned/school buildings to reduce energy costs.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The city hall installed a new controller at about $5,000 in the parking ramp that controls the lights with a timer tided to our Geographical Location instead of a sever day clock that need to be adjusted several times a year.The city hall also has its AC upgrade in 07 at $110,000 shows up on the electrical usage for the next several years.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Chuck Autio (City staff) | Cautio@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6378
2 star - Action 3:

Invest in larger energy efficiency projects through performance contracting or other funding or through smaller retro-commissioning/retrofit projects in city-owned/school buildings.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Hopkins had two buildings fall into the bottom third of the B3 energy performance ranking: City Hall and the parking ramp. In November '10 City Hall received new boilers and the parking ramp is scheduled for new lighting by Spring '11. Both projects are eligible for rebates; the boiler room has been submitted for 3892.00. The reduced use of natural gas in 2009 was due to the decision to take the boilers off line during the summer months instead of running them year round. The fuel usage so far this year for the new boilers is running about 30-40% below last year's usage. The boiler savings are starting to show up only 3 months after replacing the old boiler. The City's estimated savings is around $8,000.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
City of Hopkins fuel costs before and after boiler upgrade (2009 cost/2010 cost) Sept-Oct: $937/$96. Oct-Nov: $1165/$759. Nov-Dec: $2667/$1786.
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Chuck Autio (City staff) | Cautio@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6378

Efficient Outdoor Lighting and Signals {BP no.4}

1 star - Action 1:

Require energy efficient, Dark-Sky compliant new or replacement outdoor lighting fixtures on city-owned/private buildings and facilities.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City recently installed Dark-Sky compliant outdoor lighting at Cottageville Park. There is no policy requiring outdoor lighting on City-owned buildings and facilities to be Dark-Sky compliant, but the City does require them as practice.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Steve Stadler (City staff) | sstadler@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6350
1 star - Action 4:

Coordinate traffic signals and/or optimize signal timing so as minimize car idling at intersections yet maintain safe and publicly acceptable vehicle speeds.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Hopkins has traffic signals on fully actualized systems wherever possible to minimize car idling at intersections, specifically on Excelsior Blvd and Hwy 7. The lights are either triggered by an overhead camera detecting a car's presence or from the pavement and a magnet loop. Traffic signals are only on timers if the traffic is considered too consistent. The benefit of this is minimized car idling to give off less CO2 emissions.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Steve Stadler (City staff) | sstadler@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6350
1 star - Action 5:

Use LED/solar-powered lighting for a flashing sign or in a street, parking lot or park project.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
In 2008 Hopkins installed solar-powered, flashing trail crossing signs in Burnes Park at the trail crossing and 2nd St NE. Solar-powered panels are also going up at the Depot Coffee House, to be completed fall 2011. The City will review its Zoning Ordinance and consider appropriate amendments to exempt active solar energy systems from lot coverage and setback provisions. The City will review its code and consider appropriate amendments to require swimming pools be heated using solar or some other form of renewable energy resource where possible. Within planned unit developments, the City will consider varying setback requirements in residential zoning districts as a means of protecting solar access.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Chuck Autio (City staff) | Cautio@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6378
1 star - Action 8:

Replace the city's existing traffic signals with LEDs.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Hopkins is currently working on replacing traffic signals with energy efficient LED lighting. The City is working this into the budget for a Mainstreet signal conversion in 2012; with Mainstreet done, the City would be at 90%.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Steve Stadler (City staff) | sstadler@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6350

Land Use Land Use

Comprehensive, Climate and Energy Plans {BP no.6}

1 star - Action 1:

Adopt a comprehensive plan or (for Category B & C cities) adopt a future land use plan that was adopted by the county or a regional entity.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Every ten years, all Twin Cities area communities are required by State law to update their comprehensive plans. Hopkins comprehensive plan was last updated in 2009 and will guide the City's land use regulations and policies for the next 10-20 years. The 2009 Comprehensive Plan addresses issues of land use, transportation, parks, and more in specific detail.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Kersten Elverum (City staff) | kelverum@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6340
1 star - Action 2:

Demonstrate that regulatory ordinances comply with the comprehensive plan including but not limited to having the zoning ordinance explicitly reference the comprehensive plan as the foundational document for decision making.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The Comprehensive Plan states the City's current policy position on a number of issues including land use, housing, transportation, parks and utilities. It describes how Hopkins is likely to change and helps guide recommendations made by Hopkins boards and commissions to the City Council. Additionally, it is used by property owners and developers when considering the future use of property.Best Practice #6, Action 1, has been accomplished by the adoption of the Comprehensive Plan in 2009.
The attached is the Hopkins Zoning Ordinance No.515-570 linking the Comprehensive Plan to the Zoning Code that has been passed effective 7-26-12 to fulfill Best Practice #6 Action 2,under "Land Use".

Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Kersten Elverum (City staff) | kelverum@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6340

Resilient City Growth {BP no.7}

1 star - Action 1:

Limit barriers to higher density housing by including in the city zoning ordinance and zoning map:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
A mixed-use zoning ordinance 2011-1031,is in place to provide a variety of residential housing types and densities to support a mix of uses.It integrates new mixed use development with its surroundings by encouraging connections for pedestrians and vehicles. R-1-A district has a minimum lot size of 6000 square feet, allowing a density per acre of 7.26 units, and also mixed use zoning district allows multifamily housing at a density of at least 15 units per acre.
All necessary information are placed in Section No.543 of the mixed-use zoning ordinance which can be found at www.hopkinsmn.com/weblink8/1/doc/78550/page1.aspx
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Kersten Elverum (City staff) | kelverum@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6340

Mixed Uses {BP no.8}

3 star - Action 5:

Have a downtown zoning district that allows residential and compatible commercial development.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The Hopkins downtown overlay district was adopted in order to meet the following goals: preserve the small-town, unique character of Mainstreet Hopkins; complement the existing historic architecture; enhance the pedestrian orientation of downtown Hopkins and encourage streetscape design that is inviting and on a human scale; and communicate the community's vision for the Mainstreet area. The boundaries for the overlay district are from the south side of 1st St. N to the north side of 1st St. S and the west side of 6th Ave to the east side of 13th Ave. Guidelines are intended to convey desirable elements. All guidelines are outlined in the downtown report which can be found at http://www.hopkinsmn.com/development/downtown.php. The attached report provides planning guidelines for mixed-use around the LRT.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Kersten Elverum (City staff) | kelverum@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6340
1 star - Action 7:

Create incentives for vertical mixed-use development in appropriate locations (downtown, commercial districts near colleges or universities, historic commercial districts).

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
(See Two Links Below)

Vertical-mixed use development is specifically outlined within the City's Comprehensive Plan. The Mixed Land Use category is intended to capture anticipated redevelopment initiatives associated with the proposed LRT stations. Each station area is likely to redevelop in a mixed-use type fashion. The plan calls for redevelopment such that there is small commercial on the main floor with residential on the upper floors.Below are the links that provides specific information about land use and development in the City of Hopkins. Pages 9-11 of the second link provides data of how vertical mixed use will be integrated into the Station Area plans.

http://www.hopkinsmn.com/transportation/pdf/station-area-planning-doc.pdf

http://www.hopkinsmn.com/transportation/pdf/station-area-report.pdf
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Kersten Elverum (City staff) | kelverum@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6340

Transportation Transportation

Living Streets {BP no.11}

1 star - Action 1:

Adopt a complete streets policy, or a living streets policy, which addresses landscaping and stormwater.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Council Report 2010-115
Resolution 2010-067
Complete Street Policy

Our practices have been modified to be in accordance with the policy. The city is completely built out and no new streets are anticipated.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Nate Stanley (City staff) | Nstanley@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6356
2 star - Action 3:

Modify a street in compliance with the city's complete streets policy.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Every year during street reconstruction projects, Hopkins documents the installation of trees, green stormwater infrastructure and any utility renovations. In 2010 the City narrowed Oak Glenn, Park Lane, Ridgewood Drive, 1st St. N and 2nd St. N east of 5th Ave. N. By narrowing the streets, the City has added more green space and sidewalk space for residents. The City also planted three disease resistant elms in Burnes Park. Lastly, Opus constructed a stormwater treatment pond and infiltration basins in 2009 which treats about 33 acres of land. The City is currently working on narrowing more streets to create more green space and they will also add sidewalks to these areas.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Nate Stanley (City staff) | Nstanley@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6356
3 star - Action 5:

Identify and remedy street-trail gaps between city streets and off-road trails/bike trails to better facilitate walking and biking.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
In 2009, we added sidewalk to Blake road from Excelsior Boulevard to Highway 7.This sidewalk connects significant residential property to the Southwest Regional Trail.I have attached the final plans which explains that it connects portions of the city to a regional trail which connects to many key destinations outside the city.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Nate Stanley (City staff) | Nstanley@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6356

Mobility Options {BP no.12}

1 star - Action 1:

Increase walking, biking and transit use by one or more of the following means:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Active Living is a way of life that integrates physical activity into daily routines, through activities such as biking, walking and/or taking transit. Hopkins continues to promote wellness activities among City employees, continues to participate in and support the county-wide Step-to-It-Challenge, and continues to support the initiatives of the Hennepin County Active Living program. Hopkins has various Active Living Campaigns in place such as the Step to It Challenge and the Hopkins Citizens Academy. Every year the City of Hopkins offers an opportunity to find out more about how your City works through the Citizens Academy. The Citizens Academy is a five-week course designed to give citizens an in-depth look into City departments and programs. Hopkins in Motion is another event that focuses on the walkability/livability of Hopkins and encourages participants to be active while having fun.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Kersten Elverum (City staff) | kelverum@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6340
2 star - Action 2:

Conduct an Active Living campaign such as a Safe Routes to School program.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of Hopkins is a member of Active Living Hennepin County. As a member of this initiative, the City of Hopkins has made some progress towards an active living campaign.We now hold active events under the umbrella of Hopkins In Motion.We installed raspberry-themed bike racks at our public buildings.We conducted a grocery store market study in an effort to keep healthy food options within walking distance of many of our residents.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Kersten Elverum (City staff) | kelverum@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6340
2 star - Action 3:

Prominently identify mobility options: transit; paratransit/Dial-A-Ride; ridesharing/cab services; rental cars; bikes; airports.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Transit Link is a dial-a-ride minibus or van service for the general public that must be reserved in advance. Transit Link service is curb-to-curb service with limited assistance. Transit Link Service is different from Metro Mobility service. It is available to the general public and is intended to serve areas where regular transit route service is not available. Fares are based on distance traveled, though groups who travel together are eligible for a discount. Transit Link is owned and operated by the Metropolitan Council. Attached are links that provide information and access to Transit Link.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Kersten Elverum (City staff) | kelverum@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6340
2 star - Action 4:

Promote carpooling or ridesharing among community members, city employees, businesses, high schools and institutions of higher education.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Hopkins currently has a park and ride lot at the Hopkins Transit Center located on Excelsior Blvd. This lot gives access to bus routes and car-pool services. The City also takes part in the Minnesota Rideshare carpooling program offered through Metro Transit.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Currently routes 12, 615, 664, 664, 668, and 670 run to and from downtown Minneapolis to Hopkins.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Kersten Elverum (City staff) | kelverum@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6340

Efficient City Fleets {BP no.13}

1 star - Action 3:

Phase-in operational changes, equipment changes including electric vehicles, and no-idling practices for city or local transit fleets.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Hopkins currently monitors the Police, Fire, and Public Works Departments' fuel usage and costs. There is monthly maintenance scheduled on all City vehicles.

There are two designated electric car permit stalls with electrical outlets located in the public downtown parking ramp.

In addition, bicycles are made available for city inspectors.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Chuck Autio (City staff) | Cautio@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6378
2 star - Action 4:

Phase in bike, e-bike, foot or horseback modes for police, inspectors and other city staff.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Hopkins currently has bike police patrols. There are also bikes available to City inspectors.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Attached is the gallons of fuel used by police & fire for the past three years. Comparing years the number of miles traveled are decreasing.
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Chuck Autio (City staff) | Cautio@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6378

Demand-Side Travel Planning {BP no.14}

1 star - Action 3:

For cities with regular transit service, require or provide incentives for the siting of higher density housing at transit/density nodes.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Currently, the City provides incentives in the form of tax increment financing and other State and County grants for the siting of higher density housing. Higher density housing will also develop around the LRT station, which will provide residents easy access to transit.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Kersten Elverum (City staff) | kelverum@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6340
1 star - Action 4:

Incorporate into development regulations a travel demand management plan or transit-oriented development standards or LEED for Neighborhood Development certification.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Travel demand management (TDM) aims to increase the number and proportion of people who share rides and who travel outside of rush hours. These techniques are expected of communities in the metropolitan area served by congested portions of the metropolitan highway system and of cities that have regional business concentration, both of which include Hopkins. Page 5 of the Transportation Comprehensive plan addresses TDM policies and actions the City is doing. A mixed-use zoning ordinance will be adopted some time in the summer of 2011. TDM will be greatly improved with the mixed-use zoning ordinance.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Kersten Elverum (City staff) | kelverum@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6340

Environmental Management Environmental Management

Sustainable Purchasing {BP no.15}

1 star - Action 1:

Adopt a sustainable purchasing policy or administrative guidelines/practices directing that the city purchase at least:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Hopkins currently follows Minnesota's state statutes on purchasing EnergyStar certified equipment as well as purchasing 30% post-consumer recycled paper. There is no specific policy in place but Hopkins is looking into it and should be in place within the next year.

Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Amy Domeier (City staff) | Adomeier@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6304
Pending - Action 3:

Establish a local purchasing preference and, working with a local business association, develop a list of locally-produced products and suppliers for common purchases.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Hopkins typically buys from local manufacturers whenever possible. A list of locally-produced products and suppliers for common purchases is currently being created. Again, no specific policy is in place but it is something the City is working on.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Amy Domeier (City staff) | Adomeier@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6304
Pending - Action 5:

Set minimum standards for the percentage of recycled-content material in asphalt and roadbed aggregate or other construction materials, and for compost and warm mix asphalt use.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Hopkins does not currently have minimum standards for the percentage of recycled-content material in at least 5 products. However, the City continually looks to advocate waste reduction activities and the use of recycled products within City offices. The City is looking into a specific policy.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Amy Domeier (City staff) | Adomeier@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6304
1 star - Action 6:

Require printing services to be purchased from companies certified by Minnesota Great Printers or by the Sustainable Green Printing Partnership.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The city of Hopkins currently purchases their letter head,envelopes,statements and other printing supplies from Quality Resource Group,Inc.which is a certified member of Minnesota Great Printers.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Amy Domeier (City staff) | Adomeier@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6304

Community Forests and Soils {BP no.16}

3 star - Action 1:

Certify as a Tree City USA.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
In 2009, Hopkins was named a Tree City USA for the 30th time. Hopkins meets the four standards to become a Tree City USA by having a tree board or department, a tree care ordinance, a comprehensive community forestry program, and an Arbor Day observance.
Hopkins have been certified as a Tree City USA for at least 10 years.We did not apply for Tree City status in 2011 so are not currently listed as such. Our 2012 forestry budget is $210,000 which is much greater than $4/resident.



Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Steve Stadler (City staff) | sstadler@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6350
1 star - Action 4:

Maximize tree planting along your main downtown street or throughout the city.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:

60% of Mainstreet planted on both sides but theyre not at 40 or less tree planting interval.
The City currently has 4 trees per block on each side of the street. This density is maximized as there are signs, refuse containers, lights, etc that must also share space along the sidewalks downtown.
Page 14 of the document from the provided link provides more detail.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Steve Stadler (City staff) | sstadler@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6350

Stormwater Management {BP no.17}

3 star - Action 2:

Complete the GreenStep Municipal Stormwater Management Assessment.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
All the water from rain and snow that fall in Hopkins and is not absorbed or evaporated runs into the City's storm sewer system. In 2010, Hopkins became one of only four cities in Minnesota to be awarded a Blue Star Award, given to communities that are taking a leadership role in protecting Minnesota's water resources and public health through excellence in stormwater management. The City of Hopkins scored a 123/160 in the following categories: planning and preservation, stormwater standards and practices, and stormwater pollution prevention. The City has adapted the Water Resource Management Plan to help meet regulatory requirements, and to plan for future alterations in the existing drainage system due to redevelopment activities.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Ismail Eddihi (City staff) | Ieddihi@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6373

Parks and Trails {BP no.18}

3 star - Action 3:

Achieve minimum levels of city green space and maximize the percent within a ten-minute walk of community members.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
A tool for analyzing the local park system is the application of a population ratio standard.This standard is expressed as the number of acres of park land per one thousand people and is used to provide a general guideline for the assessment of existing and future park needs. For the Hopkins Comprehensive Plan, a standard of 7 acres of municipal park land per 1000 people is used as a benchmark for planning purposes.90% or more of residents of the city of Hopkins are within 1/2 mile of a park or protected green space.Page 7-8 of the document from the provided link under Neighborhood park states that "as shown in the service area analysis, almost every home in Hopkins is located within 1/2 mile of an existing neighborhood park".
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Steve Stadler (City staff) | sstadler@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6350
1 star - Action 6:

Certify at least one golf course in the Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary Program.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The Meadowbrook Golf course has been a certified Audubon Cooperative Sanctuary for over 2 years.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Steve Stadler (City staff) | sstadler@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6350
1 star - Action 8:

Develop a program to involve community members in hands-on land restoration, invasive species management and stewardship projects.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City of Hopkins had volunteers clean up various parts of the city to commemorate Earth Day 2010. Numerous volunteers picked up several miles of trails and roadsides, cleaned parks, and planted trees. This event will be held annually around Earth Day.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Steve Stadler (City staff) | sstadler@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6350

Sustainable Consumption and Waste {BP no.22}

2 star - Action 1:

Improve city operations and procurement to prevent and reuse, recycle and compost waste from all public facilities (including libraries, parks, schools, municipal health care facilities), and minimize use of toxics and generation of hazardous waste.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City tracks waste from refuse, recycling and organics generated from the seven Hopkins facilities. The City completed a waste audit of these facilities in the fall of 2010 which is uploaded here.The City has a policy that all cafeteria ware be compostable.Products are purchased in bulk and distributed as requested.The City recently acquired a building that is to be demolished and redeveloped. Public Works staff harvested all usable material such as cabinets, counter tops, sinks, plumbing and electrical fixtures to be re purposed within the City facilities. Through the City’s web site many services can be ordered electronically. Residents can apply for building permits, request a new refuse cart and report pot holes.These are just a few examples of the many services available to be applied for or requested online. In addition residents may also pay their utility bills by signing up for monthly EFT. All payroll for the City is delivered electronically to employee accounts.



Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
(a)It was concluded that 69.15% of total material collected was recycled or organic.
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Pam Hove (City staff) | Phove@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6351
Not rated - Action 2:

Address concerns over consumer products and packaging through encouragement/implementation of one or more of:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The City's solid waste collection system encourages residents to reduce waste through our mandatory recycling ordinance, volume-based pricing structure, and added fees for extra refuse and bulk. Additionally the City regularly provides promotional materials and activities to educate residents on waste reduction, reuse, recycling and purchasing recycled products. Our current in-house purchasing policy advocates the purchase of products made with recycled content. There is also an organics recycling program in place.
In January of 2010 Hopkins was awarded a grant from Hennepin County to implement an organics collection program and to reenergize“traditional” single stream recycling practices in the city facilities.The overall goal was to reduce waste generated from all internal city operations combined through organic and “traditional” recycling methods by 50%.The collection took place in city lunchrooms, meeting rooms, at public events,etc.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
To measure the 1st year results of the program an audit was completed in November 2010.
The results revealed that 69.15% of the waste was diverted to either traditional or organic recycling.
A follow up audit was done in November of 2011.
The results showed 48% of the waste was diverted to either traditional or organic recycling.
The program was adopted into the solid waste program for city operations with the 50% diversion rate as the goal.City staff continues to explore ways to sustain and to increase the diversion rate.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Pam Hove (City staff) | Phove@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6351
2 star - Action 4:

Publicize, promote and use the varied businesses/services collecting and marketing used, repaired and rental consumer goods, especially electronics, in the city/county.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The Recyclopedia is a waste reduction guide published every few years by twelve cities, including Hopkins, in the west metro area and mailed to all postal customers in western Hennepin County.It is also featured on the Hopkins Web Site and is handed out at City events. It features an alphabetical index of common items and how to dispose of them locally without throwing them away.
There are also many local businesses that collect used and repaired goods such as clothing, books and toys. These stores include Shop Again, Something Safari, Nine, and Steve's Train City.
Hennepin County also has a choose to reuse program. http://hennepin.us/choosetoreuse
There is no way to track the impact on City businesses, since they do not report sales, etc to us.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Pam Hove (City staff) | Phove@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6351
1 star - Action 5:

Arrange for a residential and/or business/institutional source-separated organics collection/management program.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
In 2010 Hopkins was awarded a grant for Organic Outreach to businesses and civic organizations in the City of Hopkins. No businesses so far have implemented an organics collection program, but many of them expressed an interest in doing so in the future.
In the summer of 2012 Hopkins staff and Louise Miller, a Green Consultant, provided organic and traditional recycling at community events such as:
Raspberry Festival Family Days - 3 day (Hopkins Jaycees)
Music in the Park Concert Series - Thursdays 6 weeks (Hopkins Business & Civic Association)
Hopkins Farmers Market - July through October (Hopkins Farmers Market Coop)


Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
2,085 lbs of organics were collected at these events.
267 lbs of recyclables were collected at these events.
All organics collected through Hopkins programs are composted.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Pam Hove (City staff) | Phove@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6351
3 star - Action 6:

Improve recycling services and expand to multi-unit housing and commercial businesses.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Hopkins City Code 605.03, subd 2, a, b, states that all residential (single family through tri-plexes), multi family (four plexes and up) and commercial properties separate recyclables from refuse and have it collected in a manner designated by the City. Residential household recycling collection is provided by the City through a contract with a licensed recycling hauler. Residential household recycling is collected single stream every other week on the same day that refuse collection takes place.
Hopkins has also been ranked as one of the top five cities for pounds of recycling collected per
household by Hennepin County. Hopkins owns and operates its own residential refuse collection in addition to contracting for residential recycling collection.The City is divided into four routes with collection taking place Monday through Thursday.Refuse is collected weekly and recycling is collected every other week the same day as refuse collection.
Residential households do not have the option to opt out of City provided services.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
The participation rate for Hopkins’ residential recycling households in 2011 was 98.84%.
In 2011 Hopkins recycling rate was 36.4%.
Since 2002 the City’s refuse disposal tonnage has decreased 31.6%, which has saved our residents a considerable amount of tipping fees.
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Pam Hove (City staff) | Phove@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6351

Local Air Quality {BP no.23}

1 star - Action 2:

Regulate outdoor wood burning, using ordinance language, performance standards and bans as appropriate, for at least one of the following:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Recreational fires in Hopkins do not require a permit (except during a burning ban) if they meet the requirements set forth by the Department of Natural Resources, the State of Minnesota, and the City of Hopkins. The regulations are accessible from our website. The City does require a permit for recreational burning if it does not meet regulations.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Steve Stadler (City staff) | sstadler@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6350
1 star - Action 5:

Install, assist with and promote publicly available EV charging stations or public fueling stations for alternative fuel vehicles. 

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Hopkins has two designated electric car permit stalls with electrical outlets located in the public parking ramp. Currently one individual uses the charging station.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Chuck Autio (City staff) | Cautio@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6378

Resilient Economic & Community Development Resilient Economic and Community Development

Benchmarks and Community Engagement {BP no.24}

3 star - Action 1:

Use a city commission, or committee to lead, coordinate, and report to and engage community members on implementation of sustainability best practices.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
See two links below-

Hopkins currently records all green activity on the City's website. There is also a GreenStep Cities poster located in the lobby of City Hall. The Green Intern at the City of Hopkins is also working on a pilot report to summarize the City's progress.

http://www.hopkinsmn.com/green/index.php

http://www.hopkinsmn.com/council/pdf/going-green.pdf
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Kersten Elverum (City staff) | kelverum@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6340
2 star - Action 2:

Organize goals/outcome measures from all city plans and report to community members data that show progress toward meeting these goals.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Hopkins currently supplies this information every ten years in the Comprehensive Plan. All goals/outcomes from City plans are outlined within the report. This information is available on the City's website and also by clicking at the link which is provided.
A presentation of city of Hopkins goals for 2012 and accomplishments of 2011 is also attached.
The city Planning and Development department also provides an Annual Report on housing activity to the Metropolitan Council.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Kersten Elverum (City staff) | kelverum@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6340

Green Business Development {BP no.25}

3 star - Action 5:

Lower the environmental and health risk footprint of a brownfield remediation/redevelopment project beyond regulatory requirements; report brightfield projects.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The Housing and Redevelopment Authority is responsible for addressing housing and economic development issues for the City. Multiple sites such as Cargill/Excelsior Crossing, LA Fitness, Hopkins Business Center, Hopkins Honda, etc. were given clean up money for development. The Cargill/Excelsior Crossing redevelopment had an emphasis on creating structured parking to maximize green space and to orient traffic primarily to Excelsior Boulevard. The Excelsior Crossing project is LEED certified so this project not only received funding to clean up soil (creosote was a major pollutant found), but construction and design utilized many strategies to lower the building's footprint. The LA Fitness site utilized clean up grants to fund soil clean up and provide vapor barriers to prep the site before construction. In addition to these projects, redevelopment projects in downtown Hopkins or near a future LRT Station are guided for more density and less parking than other sites, which lowers there environmental footprint. At the provided link you will be able to find specific minutes from specific information about the various sites.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Kersten Elverum (City staff) | kelverum@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6340
2 star - Action 7:

Conduct or participate in a buy local campaign for community members and local businesses.

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
Hopkins have a list of local businesses and we do promote them through the Think Hopkins marketing campaign. We have also created a printable guide to shopping and dining in Hopkins that is available for download from Think Hopkins website. The brochure compiles the list for everything from farmer's market produce to expensive wine, antiques to one-of-a-kind designer handbags... We have not implemented a buy local incentive program but we have sent a letter to the editor of the local paper identifying the benefits of shopping local.we are planning to focus on a buy local strategy through our Think Hopkins! campaign in 2013.
In addition,for over 25 years,the Hopkins Farmer's Market has offered a seasonal opportunity to Minnesota grown vegetables, fruits, herbs, meat, poultry, honey, flowers, annual plants, handmade soaps, crafts, jewelry, kettle corn, cookbooks, bakery items, and snacks. The farmers market runs Saturdays from mid-June through October. At the peak of the season there are 23 vendors that sell goods at the market.
More information on the Farmer's Market is on the City's website, www.hopkinsmn.com
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Kersten Elverum (City staff) | kelverum@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6340

Renewable Energy {BP no.26}

2 star - Action 6:

Report installed private sector-owned renewable energy/energy efficient generation capacity with at least one of the following attributes:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
The Depot Coffee House was one of the projects selected by the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources for the Solar Energy Legacy Grant. The Grant, worth $37,000, was awarded to the Depot through their partnership with Three Rivers Park District. With this grant the Depot has installed solar panels on the roof, which had lead to great educational opportunities and raised community awareness about alternative energy and sustainability.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
A Year in the Sun- Solar Report

*Annual electric went from- $6,400 to $4,200
*Power generated this year- 11,535 kWh
*Power generated since June 2011- 18,998 kWh
*Generation this YTD 2012 is equivalent to:

*The impact of 10 tons of CO2 Saved
*The impact of 1,119 Gallons of Gas Saved
*The impact of 249 trees planted
Descriptive File: view file
For more information contact:
Chuck Autio (City staff) | Cautio@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6378

Local Food {BP no.27}

2 star - Action 3:

Create, assist with and promote local food production/distribution within the city:

Date action report first entered:
Date of last report update:
Year action initially completed:
Implementation details:
For over 25 years,the Hopkins Farmer's Market has offered a seasonal opportunity to Minnesota grown vegetables, fruits, herbs, meat, poultry, honey, flowers, annual plants, handmade soaps, crafts, jewelry, kettle corn, cookbooks, bakery items, and snacks. The farmers market runs Saturdays from mid-June through October. At the peak of the season there are 23 vendors that sell goods at the market.
The City of Hopkins also provides a community garden site in Valley Park in the Westbrooke/Nine Mile Creek area where residents can lease a 20 ft by 20 ft garden plot.Residents can register for a plot at Hopkins City Hall. Due to the high demand for plots, there is a limit of two plots per household. The rate is $20 for one plot and $50 for two plots. One of the main reason of the popularity of the Community Garden Plots may relate to the fact that there is a source of water nearby that people try to get as close as possible.The Family Gardens is a place for people from a wide variety of backgrounds to come together, socialize, share gardening techniques, and admire each others bounty.
More information on the Farmer's Market and the Community Garden is on the City's website, www.hopkinsmn.com as well as Think Hopkins website www.thinkhopkins.com,articles in the Hopkins Highlights, the City's newsletter, articles in Connections, the City's e-newsletter, as well as weekly reminders.These marketing efforts also resulted in stories in the two local newspapers, the Sun Sailor and the Weekly News, as well as the local Patch.com website.
Outcome measures/metrics/money saved:
Descriptive File:
For more information contact:
Jane Ale (City staff) | Jale@hopkinsmn.com | 952-548-6302